Home
Search results “Analysis evaluation and conclusion”
Results, Discussion Conclusion chapters
 
17:55
This video presentation focuses on writing the results, Discussion and Conclusion chapters of a Masters or PhD thesis.
Views: 72602 cecile badenhorst
How to Write a Strong Conclusion
 
10:59
Step by step instruction for writing the conclusion paragraph of an analytical essay about a novel.
Views: 50801 Meg Mosier
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
09:26
Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 324338 David Taylor
Identifying Premises and Conclusions
 
05:35
http://www.criticalthinkeracademy Before you can analyze an argument you need to be sure that you've clearly identified the conclusion and the premises. This video discusses some of the challenges associated with this task.
Views: 124707 Kevin deLaplante
How To Perfect Evaluation In Economics
 
07:05
How To Perfect Evaluation In Economics - A video covering How To Perfect Evaluation In Economics How to write an amazing paragraph: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xW7gVhSx1jQ How to write a perfect judgement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dDPjUtYUnE Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 87790 EconplusDal
Analyzing the Conclusion of a Sample Argumentative Essay
 
06:58
http://www.criticalthinkeracademy.com This is a sample video from a video tutorial course titled "How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay". In this video we look at the conclusion of a sample student essay and discuss recommendations for improving it. Full table of contents: Introduction Part 1: Guidelines for Structuring an Argumentative Essay 1.1 A Minimal Five-Part Structure 1.2 Writing the Introduction 1.3 Writing the Conclusion Part 2: A Sample Essay with Some Problems (and Strategies for Fixing Them) 2.1 The Essay: "Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms?" 2.2 Analysis: The Introduction 2.3 Analysis: The Main Body: First Argument 2.4 Analysis: The Main Body: Second Argument 2.5 Analysis: The Main Body: Third Argument 2.6 Analysis: The Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations 2.7 Analysis: The Conclusion 2.8 The Essay: Improved Version 2.9 The Essay: Improved Version with Commentary
Views: 43043 Kevin deLaplante
Analyzing the argument - Part 1 of 2
 
05:32
Analyzing the argument is an important skill in everyday life, but it is particularly important in academic reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Learn the basics of how arguments are built so you can analyze them more easily. [CC] English subtitles. [CC] Subtítulos en español. [CC] Legendado em português. ______________________________ GUIDE "Critical Reading" (THIS PLAYLIST): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJhf0iVdOF5YQG0V9wlX9bhD Critical thinking and reading (introduction): https://youtu.be/iOGvwPmKOqQ Distinguishing fact from opinion: https://youtu.be/Gs9ZGW_1oMM Analyzing the argument (1/3)... https://youtu.be/pP8dWURrEF0 ______________________________ RELATED VIDEOS "Vocabulary" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJjhlBnZZkd0EuC5Wv3zYUJs "About Literacy" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJhsfgoIfpQ3mGAXiXh1Cxsm "Interpreting what we read" playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJgPenynBNKRS-_RDBK1CIyv ______________________________ FURTHER READING ABOUT THE ARGUMENT Introduction to Logic (by Beth Rosdatter, University of Kentucky): http://www.uky.edu/~rosdatte/phi120/cntablea.htm Introduction to Logic (by Kevin Klement, University of Massachussets-Amhearst): http://people.umass.edu/klement/100/logic.html Argument (in Help with Logic Coach; web site): http://academic.csuohio.edu/polen/LC9_Help/1/ ______________________________ FURTHER READING Summary of research on cell phones and cancer risk (cancer.gov article): http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/radiation/cell-phones-fact-sheet Review of evidence for the association between mobile phone use and risk of intracranial tumors (peer-reviewed article in the Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine): http://jnrbm.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12952-015-0043-7 Use of mobile phones and risk of brain tumours: update of Danish cohort study (British Medical Journal article in PDF): http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/343/bmj.d6387.full.pdf ______________________________ REFERENCES ProCon.org. (2016, January). Cell Phones ProCon.org Retrieved from http://cellphones.procon.org/ Lennart Hardell et al., "Meta-Analysis of Long-Term Mobile Phone Use and the Association With Brain Tumours," International Journal of Oncology, Mar. 2008 ______________________________ MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by Dokashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Sooner or Later" in Artificial Music by Aryll Fae
Views: 41330 Snap Language
Hypothesis testing and p-values | Inferential statistics | Probability and Statistics | Khan Academy
 
11:27
Hypothesis Testing and P-values Practice this yourself on Khan Academy right now: https://www.khanacademy.org/e/hypothesis-testing-with-simulations?utm_source=YTdescription&utm_medium=YTdescription&utm_campaign=YTdescription Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/math/probability/statistics-inferential/hypothesis-testing/v/one-tailed-and-two-tailed-tests?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=ProbabilityandStatistics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/math/probability/statistics-inferential/margin-of-error/v/margin-of-error-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=ProbabilityandStatistics Probability and statistics on Khan Academy: We dare you to go through a day in which you never consider or use probability. Did you check the weather forecast? Busted! Did you decide to go through the drive through lane vs walk in? Busted again! We are constantly creating hypotheses, making predictions, testing, and analyzing. Our lives are full of probabilities! Statistics is related to probability because much of the data we use when determining probable outcomes comes from our understanding of statistics. In these tutorials, we will cover a range of topics, some which include: independent events, dependent probability, combinatorics, hypothesis testing, descriptive statistics, random variables, probability distributions, regression, and inferential statistics. So buckle up and hop on for a wild ride. We bet you're going to be challenged AND love it! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to KhanAcademy’s Probability and Statistics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRXuOXLW3LcQLWvxbZiIZ0w?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to KhanAcademy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2131848 Khan Academy
Comparison / Contrast Essays
 
04:25
Watch Shaun's Smrt Live Class live for free on YouTube every Thursday at 17 00 GMT (17 00 GMT = https://goo.gl/cVKe0m). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats In this video, we will discuss the structure and organization of a comparison/contrast essay. Students will learn the different styles of comparing and contrasting, and after the video, will be able to organize and write a more effective essay. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Exercise: http://smrtvideolessons.com/2013/07/26/comparison-contrast-essays/ Learn English with Shaun at the Canadian College of English Language! http://www.canada-english.com
Views: 395567 Smrt English
GMAT Tuesday: Critical Reasoning - Evaluate the Argument
 
06:03
In this week's GMAT Tuesday, I’ll go over a specific Critical Reasoning question type: Evaluate the Argument. I’ll go over a sample practice question and give you 4 general steps you should always follow when tackling this kind of question. We hope this helps you conquer those tricky Critical Reasoning questions and saves you some time on test day. Enjoy! Blog post with practice question from the video: http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-critical-reasoning-evaluate-the-conclusion/ Magoosh GMAT Prep: http://gmat.magoosh.com
Views: 15322 MagooshGMAT
Understanding the p-value - Statistics Help
 
04:43
With Spanish subtitles. This video explains how to use the p-value to draw conclusions from statistical output. It includes the story of Helen, making sure that the choconutties she sells have sufficient peanuts. You might like to read my blog: http://learnandteachstatistics.wordpress.com
Views: 793539 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
Chi-square test in SPSS + interpretation
 
05:03
How to run a chi-square test and interpret the output in SPSS (v20). ASK SPSS Tutorial Series
Views: 898423 BrunelASK
How to Write an Introduction to an Argumentative Essay
 
07:13
https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 286882 Kevin deLaplante
How to Argue - Philosophical Reasoning: Crash Course Philosophy #2
 
09:43
Before we dive into the big questions of philosophy, you need to know how to argue properly. We’ll start with an overview of philosophical reasoning and breakdown of how deductive arguments work (and sometimes don’t work). -- Images and video via VideoBlocks or Wikimedia Commons, licensed under Creative Commons by 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Crash Course Philosophy is sponsored by Squarespace. http://www.squarespace.com/crashcourse -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 2281137 CrashCourse
Science 10: Properties of Compounds Analysis Conclusion and Evaluation
 
03:19
More details to help with the Lab Report for the Properties of Compounds Lab.
Views: 6 CoderreScience
AP Biology Practice 5 - Analyze Data and Evaluate Evidence
 
06:49
In this video Paul Andersen explains how scientists analyze data and evaluate evidence. He starts with a description of data and how it must be properly displayed. He then describes types of data in each of the four big ideas. He finally discusses a number of practice questions related to data analysis. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License All images are either Public Domain or Creative Commons Attribution Licenses: Amada44. Laboratory Glassware, [object HTMLTableCellElement]. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Beaker.svg. Diegofukuhara. Foto Galão 5L Catel R, March 7, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Galao.jpg. "File:Carbon-dioxide-3D-vdW.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 1, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Carbon-dioxide-3D-vdW.svg. "File:Charles David Keeling 2001.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 1, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Charles_David_Keeling_2001.jpg. "File:Geologic Clock with Events and Periods.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 16, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Geologic_Clock_with_events_and_periods.svg. "File:Island of Hawai'i - Landsat Mosaic.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 1, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Island_of_Hawai%27i_-_Landsat_mosaic.jpg. "File:Mauna Loa Carbon Dioxide-en.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 1, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mauna_Loa_Carbon_Dioxide-en.svg. "File:Russet Potato .jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 16, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Russet_potato_.jpg. "File:Russet Potato .jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 16, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Russet_potato_.jpg. "File:Signal Transduction Pathways.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 16, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Signal_transduction_pathways.svg. Praguepower. English: The Predator Prey Model, January 23, 2012. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Predator_prey.jpg. Ruellan, Gabriela F. English: Stevia Rebaudiana, Cultivated Plant., October 17, 2010. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Stevia_rebaudiana_(potted_plant).jpg. The Perpetual Ocean, n.d. http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/perpetual-ocean.html. User:Srhat, Mcstrother derivative work of Comp_inhib svg by. English: A Theoretical Mechanism for Inhibition by an Allosteric Inhibitor That Binds Equally Well to the Enzyme and Enzyme Substrate Complex and so Does Not Affect the Km of the Enzyme., 09:19 (UTC). Allosteric_comp_inhib_1.svg. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Non-competitive_inhibition.svg.
Views: 37451 Bozeman Science
Truth Table to determine if an argument is valid
 
07:07
An example of using a truth table to analyze an argument with 3 statements and 3 premises.
Views: 165941 Angiewvc
How to write a conclusion
 
04:13
How to write a conclusion paragraph for an essay. Breaking it down into simple parts and providing examples. Be sure to check out the companion video: How to Write an Introduction! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EycoDPjVoQY
Views: 497376 MrTSallee
Business strategy - SWOT analysis
 
03:08
On Udemy: https://www.udemy.com/user/365careers/ On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/365careers On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers This lesson on Business strategy introduces the idea behind doing SWOT analyses. Watch more at https://www.udemy.com/mba-in-a-box-business-lessons-from-a-ceo . This video is part of a series of short lessons about Business Strategy. The complete module can be found on Udemy, as a core part of the MBA in a Box course by CEO Valentina Bogdanova and 365 Careers. The course provides a complete Business Education: Business Strategy, Management, Marketing, Accounting, Decision Making & Negotiation in just under 10 hours. -------------------------------------------------- Strategy module table of contents: MBA in a Box: Introduction 1. What does the course cover? Section: 2 Strategy: An Introduction 2. The role of Strategy and what makes a Strategy successful 3. The difference between Corporate and Business Strategy 4. The importance of the Mission, Vision, Goals, and Values statements Section: 3 Strategy: The industry lifecycle model 5. The four stages of the industry lifecycle model - An introduction 6. The strategic importance of the industry lifecycle model 7. The Introduction stage - A new industry is born 8. The Growth stage - An industry in its expansion phase 9. The Maturity stage - An industry at its peak 10. The Decline stage - An obsolete industry Section: 4 Strategy: Porter's Five Forces model - The competitive dynamics in an industry 11. Michael Porter's Five Forces model 12. The threat of new entrants 13. The threat of substitute products 14. The intensity of current competition 15. The bargaining power of suppliers 16. The bargaining power of clients 17. Porter's Five Forces framework applied in practice Section: 5 Strategy: Game Theory - Studying the interaction between multiple parties 18. An introduction to Game Theory 19. Zero-sum games - approaching situations with a win-lose perspective 20. Non-zero-sum games - considering both cooperation and confrontation 21. Tobacco companies - a real-life example of Game Theory application Section: 6 Strategy: Focusing on the inside of a business 22. Focusing on the inside of a business - An Introduction 23. A company's lifecycle model - what should be done at different stages Section: 7 Strategy: Acquiring a competitive advantage 24. The quest for a competitive advantage - An Introduction 25. The importance of building a sustainable competitive advantage 26. The role of resources and capabilities 27. Acquiring an actual competitive advantage Section: 8 Strategy: The three main competitive strategies 28. The three main competitive strategies 29. Cost leadership - sell cheap 30. Differentiation - be different 31. Niche (Focus) strategy - find your niche market 32. The danger of hybrid strategies Section: 9 Strategy: Corporate growth strategies 33. The types of growth opportunities companies pursue 34. Organic growth - building a solid foundation 35. Inorganic growth - leveraging M&A transactions 36. Horizontal integration 37. Vertical integration Section: 10 Strategy: The SWOT analysis framework 38. An introduction to SWOT analysis 39. SWOT analysis in practice - Starbucks -------------------------------- Strategy analysis has two main branches – analysis of a firm’s external environment and analysis of a firm’s internal environment. SWOT is a famous framework that allows us to combine the two types of analysis. SWOT is sometimes referred to as internal-external analysis. The acronym SWOT stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats. The first two, Strengths and Weaknesses, are related to a firm’s internal environment, while the last two, Opportunities and Threats, consider its external environment. Internal strengths and external opportunities are vertically paired as helpful elements, while internal weaknesses and external threats are paired as harmful elements. if we perform a company analysis, under strengths, we would expect to see its core competences, the areas where the business excels and has a competitive advantage over competitors. Weaknesses are areas that need improvement. Such vulnerabilities place a company at a disadvantage when competing against other firms. Opportunities can be seen as favorable factors existing in a company’s external environment, in the industry where it operates, and have the potential to improve its current results and competitive positioning. Threats arise in a company’s external environment and might harm its current business.
Views: 82677 365 Careers
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
09:51
https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 829666 Kevin deLaplante
SPSS for questionnaire analysis:  Correlation analysis
 
20:01
Basic introduction to correlation - how to interpret correlation coefficient, and how to chose the right type of correlation measure for your situation. 0:00 Introduction to bivariate correlation 2:20 Why does SPSS provide more than one measure for correlation? 3:26 Example 1: Pearson correlation 7:54 Example 2: Spearman (rhp), Kendall's tau-b 15:26 Example 3: correlation matrix I could make this video real quick and just show you Pearson's correlation coefficient, which is commonly taught in a introductory stats course. However, the Pearson's correlation IS NOT always applicable as it depends on whether your data satisfies certain conditions. So to do correlation analysis, it's better I bring together all the types of measures of correlation given in SPSS in one presentation. Watch correlation and regression: https://youtu.be/tDxeR6JT6nM ------------------------- Correlation of 2 rodinal variables, non monotonic This question has been asked a few times, so I will make a video on it. But to answer your question, monotonic means in one direction. I suggest you plot the 2 variables and you'll see whether or not there is a monotonic relationship there. If there is a little non-monotonic relationship then Spearman is still fine. Remember we are measuring the TENDENCY for the 2 variables to move up-up/down-down/up-down together. If you have strong non-monotonic shape in the plot ie. a curve then you could abandon correlation and do a chi-square test of association - this is the "correlation" for qualitative variables. And since your 2 variables are ordinal, they are qualitative. Good luck
Views: 512710 Phil Chan
Chi-squared Test
 
11:53
Paul Andersen shows you how to calculate the ch-squared value to test your null hypothesis. He explains the importance of the critical value and defines the degrees of freedom. He also leaves you with a problem related to the animal behavior lab. This analysis is required in the AP Biology classroom. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 1406218 Bozeman Science
The Iceman Interview - Analysis of Kuklinski
 
10:06
Richard Leonard "The Iceman" Kuklinski (April 11, 1935 -- March 5, 2006) was an American mass murderer who was convicted for three murders. Kuklinski was given the nickname "Iceman" for his method of freezing a victim to confuse the time of death. The 6'5" (196 cm), 300 pound (135 kg) Kuklinski lived with his wife and children in the suburb of Dumont, New Jersey prior to his arrest. His family was apparently unaware of Kuklinski's double life and crimes. A New Jersey Police task force was formed after Kuklinski was suspected of two murders. A year-long undercover investigation led to his arrest. Kuklinski claimed to be a contract killer for Newark's DeCavalcante crime family and New York City's Five Families of the American Mafia. After his murder convictions, Kuklinski took part in a number of interviews during which he claimed to have murdered from over 100[3] to 250 men (his recollections varied) between 1948 and 1986. Three documentaries, two biographies and a feature film have been produced on Kuklinski based on his interviews and the results of the task force that brought Kuklinski to justice. His claims have not been substantiated and crime family members dispute his role in any contract killings. In this video, Kuklinski asks the psychologist about himself, "What do you think about me? Anything good, bad or indifferent?" The psychologist analyzes Kuklinski and comes up with multiple thoughts as to why Kuklinski was a successful contract killer.
Views: 945548 Mike M.
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
06:51
The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 726130 Kent Löfgren
Scientific method experiments, analysis and conclusions - Building knowledge
 
04:37
Building knowledge - Scientific method experiments, analysis and conclusions How does science build knowledge? Science uses the scientific method, learn more about the scientific method, method and experiments, analysis and conclusions. Enjoy Series Knowledge Boundaries Be bold and Carry on Channel I have believed ▶Don't click here: https://goo.gl/kjzpz8 ▶Most Recent Video: https://goo.gl/8dhvrz ▶Most Popular Upload: https://goo.gl/dC8rys ▶Knowledge Boundaries: https://goo.gl/F7btQJ ▶Marketing: https://goo.gl/h1okLH ▶Am I manipulated: https://goo.gl/2ZU8DC #IhaveBelieved #BeboldandCarryOn #knowledge #buildingknowledge #scientificmethod #method #experiments #analysis #conclusions #facts #hypothesis #fact #observations #observation #questions #question #hypotheses #experiment #analyses #conclusion #steps #process #thescientificmethod ▶Subscribe: https://goo.gl/kjzpz8 Follow us: ▶Google+ https://goo.gl/m8S5Si ▶Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Ihavebelieved/ ▶Twitter: https://twitter.com/ihave_believed ▶Blog: https://ihavebelieved.wordpress.com/
Views: 1364 I have Believed
Explanation of Regression Analysis Results
 
06:14
A brief explanation of the output of regression analysis. For more information visit www.calgarybusinessblog.com
Views: 465958 Matt Kermode
CER - Claim Evidence Reasoning
 
07:25
In this video Paul Andersen explains how the CER framework can be used to give explanations in a science classroom. In order to make a complete explanation a Claim must be supported by Evidence and Reasoning connecting the evidence to the claim. McNeil and Krajcik book on CER - https://www.amazon.com/Supporting-Students-Constructing-Explanations-Science/dp/0137043457 The Argumentation Toolkit (McNeil) - http://www.argumentationtoolkit.org/ Learn more here: https://www.edutopia.org/blog/science-inquiry-claim-evidence-reasoning-eric-brunsell Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Joseph Priestley, the discoverer of oxygen. (Frame only). (n.d.). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Joseph_Priestley,_the_discoverer_of_oxygen._(Frame_only)_Wellcome_L0068365.jpg Schweiss, user:Markus. (2005). English: Boling water in colour. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kochendes_wasser02.jpg
Views: 132203 Bozeman Science
Science 10: Properties of Compounds Analysis and Conclusion
 
04:08
Tips and Hints for completing the Analysis, conclusion and evaluation sections of the Properties of Compounds Lab.
Views: 16 CoderreScience
Book Analysis Part 4/6 Conclusion: Summarise Your Arguments and Prove Your Thesis.
 
05:01
A continuation of the analysis of the "The Doll House" essay where a third argument is discussed as well as presenting how to wrap up an essay anc conclude by proving that the chosen thesis statement is correct. A follow up of A Book Analysis part 3/6.
Views: 1912 RetorikKurser
How to Read a Research Paper
 
08:44
Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 205598 Siraj Raval
Writing-up Qualitative Research
 
26:39
Looks at a range of issues that need thinking about when writing up qualitative research. These include: getting started, free-writing, organization – chronological, thematic etc. – focus, drop files, getting feedback, details, tightening up, style, conclusions and editing. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Becker, H. S. (1986). Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish your Thesis, Book or Article. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. Elbow, P. (1981) Writing with Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process. New York: Oxford University Press Wolcott, H. F. (2009) Writing up qualitative research (3rd ed.). Newbury Park, Calif. ; London: Sage.
Views: 43463 Graham R Gibbs
Academic Writing Tips : How to Write a Literary Analysis Paper
 
03:03
Writing a literary analysis paper involves finding a topic that is personally interesting, finding primary sources of other analysts and coming to a compelling conclusion. Write a literary analysis paper with tips from a produced playwright in this free video on writing. Expert: Laura Turner Bio: Laura Turner received her B.A. in English from the University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., graduating magna cum laude with honors. Her plays have been seen and heard from Alaska to Tennessee. Filmmaker: Todd Green
Views: 81667 eHow
A level Business Revision - Chains of Analysis
 
16:31
This tutorial examines the key exam skill of analysis, explaining what exam markers are looking for in student's exam answers. A level Business revision from TakingTheBiz.
Views: 17945 TakingTheBiz
Write an A+ essay about ART in 4 STEPS!
 
04:30
#khanacademytalentsearch Ellie Pinzarrone shares four steps for creatives to consider when writing a visual analysis. Created by Ellie Pinz Studio http://www.elliepinz.com https://www.etsy.com/shop/ElliePinz Four tips specifically for creative minds to help you get an A+ when you are writing about art I never sit down and write a perfect essay intro, content, and conclusion. For me writing about art is more like putting together a puzzle! That is the mindset you should have when you approach your writing project! The painting we'll be using for this exercise is Vermeer's "A Lady Writing" c. 1665. courtesy of the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC Step 1: Make a mini Mind Map. Make a mini drawing of the painting to help you see the shapes more clearly! Around the drawing make little descriptive notes, include your general observations (what you SEE not THINK) describe using elements of art: line, color, light, shape, figures, space, surface plane, and texture Step 2: The Nutshell: Based on your observations if you had to describe it in a nutshell what would you say? What does the work remind you of? Step 3: What has the artist achieved in this painting? Evaluate the work based on visual evidence Step 4: Organize in paragraph format! Description, analysis, and evaluation! Start and end with a POW!
Views: 39536 Ellie Pinzarrone
The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion Retrospective
 
04:57:58
A retrospective look at The Elder Scrolls IV. Timestamps for each topic: Introductions - 00:02:46 Levelling and Scaling - 00:21:15 Introductions con't - 00:58:59 Culture - 01:01:21 NPC's - 01:13:39 Interactivity - 01:50:24 Visual Presentation - 02:05:31 Audio Presentation - 02:16:38 Technical Issues - 02:27:10 Version Differences - 02:37:42 Mechanics and Combat - 02:48:25 Accessibility and World building - 03:04:43 Writing - 03:36:36 Factions - 03:50:41 Main Quest - 04:32:42 DLC/Expansions - 04:43:28 Conclusion - 04:54:04
Views: 809820 WillLovesVideoGames
How To Write An Article Review (Definition, Types, Formatting)
 
06:57
In this video, James from EssayPro explains how to write an article review from start to finish. In the beginning, James states an article review is a critical, constructive evaluation of literature in a particular field through summary, classification, analysis, and comparison. If it is a scientific review article that uses database searches to portray the research. The article review is broken down into 5 core parts: Summarization, classification, analysis, critiques, and comparison. These core parts require one to use theories, ideas, and research, relevant to the subject area of the article. Afterward, James mentions that there are different types of article reviews. First of all, there is the journal article review which will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of an article. Next, there is the research article review which differs from a journal article review by the way that it evaluates the research methods used and holds that information in retrospect to analysis and critique. Lastly, there is the scientific article review which involves anything in the realm of science. Often, scientific articles include more information on the background that you can use to analyze the article in a more comprehensive way. Afterwards, James explains the importance of properly formatting an article review. The steps involved in this process are: 1. Pre-title page: here, you will want to list the type of the article that you are reviewing, the title of the article, all the authors who contributed to the article, authors affiliations (position, department, institute, city, state, country, email ID) 2. Optional corresponding author details: name, address, phone number, email, and fax number. 3. Running head: This is only in APA format. It is the title of your paper shortened to less than 40 characters. 4. Summary page: This can be optional, depending on what your instructor assigns. The summary should be a maximum of 800 words long. Use simple and non-technical language. Do not repeat text verbatim or give references in this section. 5. Title page: which will contain your title (obviously) 6. An Introduction 7. The Body: Include headings and subheadings 8. A Works Cited/or References page 9. Possibly followed by Tables and Figure legends (if instructed by the professor) After finishing your rough draft, make sure to do these last 3 steps: 1. Summarize the Article Make a summary of the article by revisiting what the author has written about. Note relevant facts and findings of the article. Include the author's conclusions in this section. 2. Critique the Article Present the strengths and weaknesses that you have found in the article. In addition, highlight the knowledge that the author has contributed in the field. Also, write about the gaps and contradictions in the article. Take a standpoint of either supporting or not with the author's assertions but support your arguments with facts and relevant theories that are pertinent to the area of knowledge. Rubrics and templates can also be used to evaluate and grade the person reviewing the article. 3. Crafting a Conclusion In this section, revisit the key points of your piece, your findings of the article, and your critique. Also write about the accuracy, validity, and relevance of the results of the article review. Give the way forward for future research in the field of study. Lastly, re-read your piece a day after you finished writing it. This will help you spot grammar mistakes and see any flaws in the organization so you aren’t having to make tons of revisions due to small errors.
Views: 5505 EssayPro
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Introduction
 
04:13
http://kevindelaplante.com/essay-writing-course :: How do you write a good argumentative essay? Introduction to the videos on this topic. This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: http://kevindelaplante.com/essay-writing-course Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: http://kevindelaplante.com/essay-writing-course SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 120596 Kevin deLaplante
Present, Explain, and Evaluate - Writing a Short Philosophy Paper
 
11:40
This briefly outlines a method for writing a short 3-5 page philosophy paper that presents, explains, and evaluates a single argument. After outlining the method, we walk through an example from an actual student paper.
Views: 31029 Andrew Cullison
CPN 101: Writing the Analysis/Evaluation Essay
 
00:42
Video version of my "Approaches to Writing the Analysis/Evaluation Essay" lecture for my Academic Writing II on Computer course at the State University of New York College at Cortland.
Views: 7280 Ed McCorduck
Analysis of a Sample Argumentative Essay: The Main Body
 
11:10
http://www.criticalthinkeracademy.com This video summarizes the overall logic of the argument presented in the main body of our sample essay, and presents some recommendations for rewriting.
Views: 33211 Kevin deLaplante
Standard Deviation - Explained and Visualized
 
03:43
Video transcript: "Have we discovered a new particle in physics? Is a manufacturing process out of control? What percentage of men are taller than Lebron James? How about taller than Yao Ming? All of these questions can be answered using the concept of standard deviation. For any set of data, the mean and standard deviation can be calculated. For example, five people may have the following amounts of money in their wallets: 21, 50, 62, 85, and 90. The mean is $61.60 and the standard deviation is $28.01. How much does the data vary from the average? Standard deviation is a measure of spread, that is, how spread out a set of data is. A low standard deviation tells us that the data is closely clustered around the mean (or average), while a high standard deviation indicates that the data is dispersed over a wider range of values. It is used when the distribution of data is approximately normal, resembling a bell curve. Standard deviation is commonly used to understand whether a specific data point is “standard” and expected or unusual and unexpected. Standard deviation is represented by the lowercase greek letter sigma. A data point’s distance from the mean can be measured by the number of standard deviations that it is above or below the mean. A data point that is beyond a certain number of standard deviations from the mean represents an outcome that is significantly above or below the average. This can be used to determine whether a result is statistically significant or part of expected variation, such as whether a bottle with an extra ounce of soda is to be expected or warrants further investigation into the production line. The 68-95-99.7 rule tells us that about 68% of the data fall within one standard deviation of the mean. About 95% of data fall within two standard deviations of the mean. And about 99.7% of data fall within 3 standard deviations of the mean. The average height of an American adult male is 5’10, with a standard deviation of 3 inches. Using the 68-95-99.7 rule, this means that 68% of American men are 5’10 plus or minus 3 inches, 95% of American men are 5’10 plus or minus 6 inches, and 99.7% of American men are 5’10 plus or minus 9 inches. So, this means only about .3% of American men deviate more than 9 inches from the average, with .15% taller than 6’7 and .15% shorter than 5’1. This reasoning suggests that Lebron James is 1 in 2500 and Yao Ming is 1 in 450 million. In particle physics, scientists have what are called 5-sigma results, results that are five standard deviations above or below the mean. A result that varies this much can signify a discovery as it has only a 1 in 3.5 million chance that it is due to random fluctuation. In summary, standard deviation is a measure of spread. Along with the mean, the standard deviation allows us to determine whether a value is statistically significant or part of expected variation."
Views: 914832 Jeremy Jones
Writing the Results Section for Research Papers
 
10:08
The Results section of a scientific research paper represents the core findings of a study derived from the methods applied to gather and analyze information. It presents these findings in a logical sequence without bias or interpretation from the author, setting up the reader for later interpretation and evaluation in the Discussion section. This video explains what the purpose of the Results section is, what it includes, and how to structure and compose your study's findings in a research paper. Wordvice YouTube videos: "How to Write a Research Paper Introduction" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTC-5P1VFFU) "Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcuL_IaRtXc) "How to Write an Abstract for a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMEnRBss6V4) "How to Write a Research Paper Title" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl1q-I3bE0c) Wordvice Resources Page "Useful Phrases for Academic Writing" (https://wordvice.com/useful-phrases-for-writing-academic-papers/) "Common Transition Terms in Academic Paper" (https://wordvice.com/common-transition-terms-used-in-academic-papers/) "Active and Passive Voice in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/video-should-i-use-active-or-passive-voice-in-a-research-paper/) "100+ Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing" (https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/) "Tips for Paraphrasing in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/a-guide-to-paraphrasing-in-research-papers-apa-ama/) External Resources University of Minnesota. "Guidelines for Writing a Literature Review." (http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html) The UNC Writing Center. "Literature Reviews." (https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/literature-reviews/) Wordvice offers editing services in several languages and countries: ENGLISH: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Interpreting Output for Multiple Regression in SPSS
 
08:41
This video demonstrates how to interpret multiple regression output in SPSS. This example includes two predictor variables and one outcome variable. Unstandardized and standardized coefficients are reviewed.
Views: 142217 Dr. Todd Grande
How to write a thesis statement for an analytical essay
 
11:24
The qualities and examples of strong thesis statements to be used in an analytical essay about a novel.
Views: 113951 Meg Mosier
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
17:12
"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 564497 David Taylor