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Search results “Articles 10 and 11 of the european convention on human rights”
Human Rights Act 1998 (European Convention on Human Rights)
 
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The Human Rights Act 1998 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament which received Royal Assent on November 9, 1998, and came into force on October 1, 2000. Its aim is to incorporate into UK law the rights contained in the European Convention on Human Rights. The Act makes available in UK courts a remedy for breach of a Convention right, without the need to go to European Court of Human Rights, in Strasbourg. In particular, the Act makes it illegal for any public body to act in a way which is incompatible with the Convention. It also requires UK judges take account of decisions of the Strasbourg court, and to interpret legislation, as far as possible, in a way which is compatible with the Convention. However, if it is not possible to interpret an Act of Parliament so as to make it compatible with the Convention, the judges are not allowed to override it.. This declaration does not affect the validity of the Act of Parliament: in that way, the Human Rights Act seeks to maintain the principle of Parliamentary Sovereignty. The Convention on Human Rights contains twelve fundamental rights and sovereignties. A further five are added by the first and sixth practices. Some moralities are 'unqualified rights' which means they are absolute. There is no need for the Court to consider whether the action of the body making the decision was reasonable. It only has to look at whether a Convention Right was violated. Some of the truths are qualified rights and these only apply so long as there is no conflict with some other, equally weighty, rights or interests. Some concord moralities are 'unqualified rights' which means they are utter. There is no need for the Court to ruminate whether the action of the body making the verdict was reasonable. It only has to look at whether a Concord Right was debased and they are as follows Article 1 - Abolition of the death penalty, Article 2 - Right to life, Article 3 - Prohibition of torture, Article 4 - Prohibition of slavery, Article 5 - Right to liberty, Article 6 - Right to a fair trial, Article 7 - No punishment without law, Article 12 - Right to marry, Article 14 - Prohibition of discrimination. Some of the rights are qualified rights and these only relate so long as there is no clash with some other, likewise important, truths or interests. Article 8 - Right to respect for private and family life, Article 9 - Freedom of thought, conscience and Religion, Article 10 - Freedom of expression, Article 11 - Freedom of assembly and association, Article 1 - Protection of property, Article 2 Death penalty in time of war. The Human Rights Act 1998 (henceforth referred to as ‘the Act’) is a highly significant piece of legislation which entered into force on 2nd October 2000. It combines into UK law the various rights and freedoms contained within the European Convention on Human Rights and secures a wide range of civil rights and freedoms of the individual against interference by the State. The result of this is that an individual is now able to seek legal redress in a court in England or Wales.. Yet under the Act, any UK citizen is now able to enforce their rights in the domestic courts of England and Wales. A limitation occurs where UK law conflicts with the Convention; in such circumstances, the individual will be obliged to make the application to Strasbourg, as was required prior to the passing of the Act. The Act applies to public authorities, along with those bodies carrying out public functions, and provides that they must act in a manner which is compatible with the Convention . If an individual feels that this Convention right has been breached by such a public authority, he may be entitled to challenge this by the process of judicial review.
Article 10. Human rights
 
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Charity worker moved on by Police
Views: 96 Jennifer West
(ENG) ECHR - COURTalks-disCOURs, Admissibility of an application (English version)
 
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This video offers a fifteen-minute talk by a lawyer from the Registry of the European Court of Human Rights (http://www.echr.coe.int) and was recorded in the Court’s main hearing room. It explains the admissibility criteria that each application must fulfill in order to be examined further by the Court and is principally aimed at legal professionals and civil society organisations. The video was produced by the Court in cooperation with, and with the support of, the Council of Europe’s Programme “Human Rights Education for Legal Professionals” (HELP; http://www.coe.int/help). Entire talk: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/COURTalks_Inad_Talk_ENG.pdf Relevant ECHR Case-Law of the video: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/COURTalks_Inad_CaseLaw_ENG.pdf Guide on the Admissibility Criteria: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Admissibility_guide_ENG.pdf Table of content: 1. Application form and Rule 47 of the Rules of Court - 0:44 2. Exhaustion of domestic remedies and six-month time-limit (Article 35 § 1 of the Convention) - 02:18 3. Abuse of the right of application (Article 35 § 3 of the Convention) - 04:37 4. Application already submitted to the Court or another international body (Article 35 § 2 of the Convention) - 05:30 5. Victim status (Article 34 of the Convention) - 05:58 6. State liability (Ratione personae)( Article 35 § 3 of the Convention) - 07:29 7. Territorial jurisdiction (Ratione loci) (Article 35 § 3 of the Convention) - 08:41 8. Temporal jurisdiction (Ratione temporis) (Article 35 § 3 of the Convention) - 09:17 9. Subject-matter of the case (Ratione materiae) (Article 35 § 3 of the Convention) - 10:18 10. No significant disadvantage (Article 35 § 3 (b) of the Convention) - 11:22 11. Manifestly ill-founded (Article 35 § 3 de la Convention) - 12:50 12. Final remarks - 14:27 © Council of Europe/European Court of Human Rights Disclaimer: The contents of this video do not bind the Court. Music: Lino Rise - Channel Intro Belgium; Royalty Free / Creative Commons Licence ECHR: http://www.echr.coe.int HUDOC database: http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/
European Convention on Human Rights | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: European Convention on Human Rights 00:01:13 1 History 00:05:27 2 Drafting 00:05:59 3 Convention articles 00:07:08 3.1 Article 1 – respecting rights 00:07:54 3.2 Article 2 – life 00:10:03 3.3 Article 3 – torture 00:11:36 3.4 Article 4 – servitude 00:12:09 3.5 Article 5 – liberty and security 00:13:20 3.6 Article 6 – fair trial 00:15:21 3.7 Article 7 – retroactivity 00:16:22 3.8 Article 8 – privacy 00:18:07 3.9 Article 9 – conscience and religion 00:19:38 3.10 Article 10 – expression 00:21:14 3.11 Article 11 – association 00:21:48 3.12 Article 12 – marriage 00:23:20 3.13 Article 13 – effective remedy 00:23:48 3.14 Article 14 – discrimination 00:25:19 3.15 Article 15 – derogations 00:27:54 3.16 Article 16 – aliens 00:28:16 3.17 Article 17 – abuse of rights 00:28:48 3.18 Article 18 – permitted restrictions 00:29:30 4 Convention protocols 00:30:04 4.1 Protocol 1 00:30:24 4.1.1 Article 1 – property 00:30:55 4.1.2 Article 2 – education 00:32:02 4.1.3 Article 3 – elections 00:32:25 4.2 Protocol 4 – civil imprisonment, free movement, expulsion 00:33:40 4.3 Protocol 6 – restriction of death penalty 00:34:06 4.4 Protocol 7 – crime and family 00:35:03 4.5 Protocol 12 – discrimination 00:36:52 4.6 Protocol 13 – complete abolition of death penalty 00:37:20 4.7 Procedural and institutional protocols 00:37:59 4.7.1 Protocol 11 00:38:41 4.7.2 Protocol 14 00:40:44 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) (formally the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms) is an international treaty to protect human rights and political freedoms in Europe. Drafted in 1950 by the then newly formed Council of Europe, the convention entered into force on 3 September 1953. All Council of Europe member states are party to the Convention and new members are expected to ratify the convention at the earliest opportunity.The Convention established the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). Any person who feels his or her rights have been violated under the Convention by a state party can take a case to the Court. Judgments finding violations are binding on the States concerned and they are obliged to execute them. The Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe monitors the execution of judgements, particularly to ensure payment of the amounts awarded by the Court to the applicants in compensation for the damage they have sustained. The compensations imposed under ECHR can be large; in 2014 Russia was ordered to pay in excess of $2 billion in damages to former shareholders of Yukos.The Convention has several protocols, which amend the convention framework.
Views: 36 wikipedia tts
Article 10- Human Rights
 
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A student made video on Human Rights. Made by students from 10b/ct1.
30 days till #OYW2018, 30 Human Rights - Article 11 in Action
 
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What does Article 11 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights look like in action? Meet Kenny Imafidon...
Views: 136 One Young World
The African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights (ACHPR)
 
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The African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights (also known as the Banjul Charter) is an international human rights instrument that is intended to promote and protect human rights and basic freedoms in the African continent. It emerged under the aegis of the Organisation of African Unity (since replaced by the African Union) which, at its 1979 Assembly of Heads of State and Government, adopted a resolution calling for the creation of a committee of experts to draft a continent-wide human rights instrument, similar to those that already existed in Europe (European Convention on Human Rights) and the Americas (American Convention on Human Rights). This committee was duly set up, and it produced a draft that was unanimously approved at the OAU's 18th Assembly held in June 1981, in Nairobi, Kenya. Pursuant to its Article 63 (whereby it was to "come into force three months after the reception by the Secretary General of the instruments of ratification or adherence of a simple majority" of the OAU's member states, the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights came into effect on 21 October 1986– in honour of which 21 October was declared "African Human Rights Day". The African Charter on Human and People's Rights includes preamble, 3 parts, 4 chapters, and 63 articles.The Charter followed the footsteps of the European and Inter-American systems by creating a regional human rights system for Africa. The Charter shares many features with other regional instruments, but also has notable unique characteristics concerning the norms it recognizes and also its supervisory mechanism. The Charter recognizes most of what are regarded universally accepted civil and political rights. The civil and political rights recognised in the Charter include the right to freedom from discrimination (Article 2 and 18(3)), equality (Article 3), life and personal integrity (Article 4), dignity (Article 5), freedom from slavery (Article 5), freedom from cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment (Article 5), rights to due process concerning arrest and detention (Article 6), the right to a fair trial (Article 7 and 25), freedom of religion (Article 8), freedom of information and expression (Article 9), freedom of association (Article 10), freedom to assembly (Article 11), freedom of movement (Article 12), freedom to political participation (Article 13), and the right to property (Article 14). The Charter also recognises certain economic, social and cultural rights, and overall the Charter is considered to place considerable emphasis on these rights. The Charter recognises right to work (Article 15), the right to health (Article 16), and the right to education (Article 17). Through a decision by the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights, SERAC v Nigeria (2001), the Charter is also understood to include a right to housing and a right to food as “implicit” in the Charter, particularly in light of its provisions on the right to life (Art. 4), right to health (Art. 16) and to development (Art. 22). In addition to recognising the individual rights mentioned above the Charter also recognises collective or group rights, or peoples' rights and third-generation human rights. As such the Charter recognises group rights to a degree not matched by the European or Inter-American regional human rights instruments. The Charter awards the family protection by the state (Article 18), while "peoples" have the right to equality (Article 19), the right to self-determination (Article 20), to freely dispose of their wealth and natural resources (Article 21), the right to development (Article 22), the right to peace and security (Article 23) and "a generally satisfactory environment" (Article 24). The Charter not only awards rights to individuals and peoples, but also includes duties incumbent upon them. These duties are contained in Article 29 and are as follows: The duty to preserve the harmonious development of the family, To serve the national community by placing both physical and intellectual abilities at its service, Not to compromise the security of the State, To preserve and strengthen social and national solidarity, To preserve and strengthen national independence and the territorial integrity of one's country and to contribute to its defence, To work to the best of one's abilities and competence and to pay taxes in the interest of society, To preserve and strengthen positive African cultural values and in general to contribute to the promotion of the moral well-being of society, To contribute to the best of one's abilities to the promotion and achievement of African unity.
Votes for Prisoners? Democracy and the European Convention on Human Rights
 
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Decisions of the European Court of Human Rights holding that the UK's blanket ban on voting by convicted prisoners violates Article 3 of Protocol 1 to the European Convention on Human Rights have caused controversy in the UK. Professor David Feldman discusses the judgements of the European Court, and considers the principles behind allowing prisoners to vote. Professor Feldman is Rouse Ball Professor of English Law, Honorary Bencher of Lincoln's Inn, and Fellow of the British Academy. He has acted as advisor to a number of Government Joint Select Committees, and was Judge of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina 2002-10. For more information about Professor Feldman, please refer to his profile at http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/people/academic/dj-feldman/723 Law in Focus is a collection of short videos featuring academics from the University of Cambridge Faculty of Law, addressing legal issues in current affairs and the news. These issues are examples of the many which challenge researchers and students studying undergraduate and postgraduate law at the Faculty. Russian subtitles supplied courtesy of Anton Burkov.
Views: 10216 Cambridge University
Article 10- Human Rights
 
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A student made video on Human Rights. Made by students from 10b/ct1.
(ENG) ECHR - COURTalks-disCOURs Asylum (English version)
 
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This video offers a twenty-five-minute talk by a lawyer from the Registry of the European Court of Human Rights (http://www.echr.coe.int) and was recorded in the Court’s main hearing room. It provides an overview of the Court’s jurisprudence in matters related to asylum. It is principally aimed at legal professionals and civil society organisations. The video was produced by the Court in cooperation with, and with the support of, the Council of Europe’s Programme “Human Rights Education for Legal Professionals” (HELP; http://www.coe.int/help). Entire talk: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/COURTalks_Asyl_Talk_ENG.pdf Handbook on European law relating to asylum, borders and immigration: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Handbook_asylum_ENG.pdf Table of content: 1. Key notions on asylum and the ECHR - 0:18 2. Barriers to removal of asylum seekers - 02:35 3. Assessment of the risk - 06:30 4. Diplomatic assurances and internal relocation - 09:33 5. Vulnerable groups - 11:08 6. Conditions of reception of asylum seekers - 13:08 7. Detention of asylum seekers - 15:22 8. Asylum procedure and effective remedies - 17:43 9. Interim measures under Rule 39 - 21:29 10. Collective expulsions - 22:25 11. Final remarks on asylum and the ECHR - 23:17 © Council of Europe/European Court of Human Rights Disclaimer: The contents of this video do not bind the Court. Music: Lino Rise - Channel Intro Belgium; Royalty Free / Creative Commons Licence ECHR: http://www.echr.coe.int HUDOC database: http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/
Article 10-human rights 2018/19
 
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Looking at the UDHR article 10; a right to a public trial.
The Universal Declaration  of Human Rights - Article 10
 
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Took me 6 hours to do everything, this is for my geography/history class Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/liquidx
Views: 44 jgddjghjfdgdfg
Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 10
 
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We all have the right to a fair and public trial. Know your rights. www.rrrt.org
Views: 540 PacificRRRT
Law Class Assignment: Human Rights Article 4 Slavery
 
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Made with Sony Vegas 14.
Views: 64 Jayden LaPointe
European Convention on Human Rights
 
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The European Convention on Human Rights was authored by Winston Churchill, and enshrined in law the fundamental British civil liberties that we all take for granted. Could the German people have stopped Hitler if he hadn't taken away their liberties? These are important questions we must face again, as the gradual erosion of civil liberties take place today. Civil Liberties in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_liberties_in_the_United_Kingdom David Davis' resignation in protest of the erosion of fundamental rights: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzpodjxmHlI&feature=related This film is an excerpt from the feature length documentary "Taking Liberties - since 1997" Written and Directed by Chris Atkins Animation by Nexus Productions Narration by Ashley Jensen
Views: 8950 iamliberty2
Article 11
 
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RRRT UDHR PSA
Views: 414 RRRTpacific
Human rights and Europe: a discussion - Rights Enshrined (#5)
 
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For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Free learning from The Open University: http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/exploring-the-boundaries-international-law/content-section-0 --- DESCRIPTION How are human rights enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights and what is the role of the European Court of Human Rights in protecting them? Rosemary McKillen, Open University lecturer in law, is joined by fellow lecturers Jessica Giles and Hugh McFall to discuss these issues and the relationship between the UK and the ECHR. This relationship is explored further in the Rights Enshrined case study videos which accompany this podcast. (Part 1 of 5) Playlist link - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWBMeuSagGw&index=1&list=PLhQpDGfX5e7CqLvh8N7zSyKEq-gmso6xp Transcript – http://media-podcast.open.ac.uk/feeds/3103_rightsenshrined/transcript/35618_ou_rightsenshrined_discussion_v1.pdf --- Learn more about International Law http://www.open.edu/openlearn/people-politics-law/exploring-the-boundaries-international-law/content-section-0 Study Exploring Legal Meaning http://www.open.ac.uk/postgraduate/modules/w820
Patrick Stewart sketch: what has the ECHR ever done for us?
 
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After Theresa May says Britain should leave the European convention on human rights, Patrick Stewart, Adrian Scarborough and Sarah Solemani expose the problems in the Conservative plan for a UK bill of rights. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://is.gd/subscribeguardian This satirical take on the classic Monty Python sketch asks ‘what has the European Convention on Human Rights ever done for us?’ Apart from the right to a fair trial, freedom from slavery, freedom from torture ... Guardian website ► http://is.gd/guardianhome Suggested videos: Exploitation, exploitation, exploitation ► http://bit.ly/ExpExpExp Owen Jones meets Shami Chakrabarti ► http://bit.ly/OwenShami Guardian playlists: Comment is Free ► http://is.gd/cifplaylist Guardian Docs ► http://is.gd/guardiandocs Guardian Features ► https://goo.gl/JThOzd Guardian Animations & Explanations ►http://is.gd/explainers Guardian Investigations ► http://is.gd/guardianinvestigations The Global Migration Crisis ► http://is.gd/RefugeeCrisis Anywhere but Westminster ► https://goo.gl/rgH1ri Casetteboy remix the news ► http://ow.ly/TUqey More Guardian videos: We Walk Together ► http://bit.ly/WeWalkTogetherFilm Everyday racism - Akala ► http://bit.ly/akalacif Pretty Radical ► http://is.gd/PrettyRadical1 Capitalism is failing - Paul Mason ► http://is.gd/MasonCif My life as a female bodybuilder ► https://goo.gl/4U4jHt After Banksy: the parkour guide to Gaza ► http://ow.ly/TUpgj If I Die On Mars ► http://is.gd/IfIDieOnMars Revenge Porn: Chrissy Chambers and her search for justice ► http://ow.ly/TUoOs Mos Def force fed in Gitmo procedure ► http://is.gd/mosdef Edward Snowden interview ► http://is.gd/snowdeninterview2014 Bangladeshi Sex Workers take steroids ► http://is.gd/sexworkers Other Guardian channels on YouTube: Guardian Football ► http://is.gd/guardianfootball Guardian Music ► http://is.gd/guardianYTmusic Guardian Australia ► http://is.gd/guardianaustralia Guardian Tech ► http://is.gd/guardiantech Guardian Culture ► http://is.gd/guardianculture Guardian Wires ► http://is.gd/guardianwires Guardian Food ► http://is.gd/guardianfood
Views: 1096787 The Guardian
Human Rights Video #5: Freedom From Torture
 
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Human Right #5 = No Torture. (HD) Nobody has any right to hurt us or torture us. Watch the Human Rights campaign of 30 videos, based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and sponsored by the Church of Scientology. Order the free documentary DVD: http://www.scientology.org/how-we-help/human-rights/voice-for-human-rights.html An introduction to the global human rights program, used by United For Human Rights and Youth For Human Rights organizations to educate youth and cultures worldwide of their inalienable rights. Watch all 30 Human Rights commercials by Scientology: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKlUS0rCvls&list=PL7DC75B22549B4F2E SUBSCRIBE! http://bit.ly/SubscribeToOurChannel to be the first to watch new Scientology videos! Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 5: No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Freedom From Torture: 0:01 When I was walking home from school, they asked me for my money. 0:06 I said no. 0:08 And all my friends ran home, 0:11 'cause they were scared that he might punch them too. 0:14 I was screaming, but he just wouldn't stop. 0:20 He always said he would hit me. I just didn't think he actually would. 0:24 I don't know what I did, but they just kept on kicking me. 0:29 They tied me up and dragged me outside. 0:32 They stripped me of my dignity. 0:35 She said... 0:37 she was going to teach me a lesson. 0:41 He said I wasn't listening. 0:44 I didn't think he'd get so mad. To broadly raise awareness of the 30 inalienable rights as proclaimed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Church of Scientology sponsored the production of a corresponding series of Public Service Announcements illuminating these rights. Each is intended to provide young people with an appreciation of a fundamental tenet within every free society, so that the generation of tomorrow need not repeat the errors of its predecessors. Visit Scientology.org to watch 400+ videos, answer the question 'What is Scientology?,' learn about Spiritual Technology, read the FAQ's, locate a church near you and get the latest Scientology news: http://bit.ly/WhatIsScientologyYT2
Views: 19568 Scientology
Trade Union Rights and the Right to Strike in light of ECtHR Jurisprudence
 
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e-Presentation by John Hendy QC John Hendy QC discusses recent cases of the European Court of Human Rights dealing with Article 11 of the European Convention on the freedom of assembly and association. ---- For the premium version please go to: https://www.era.int/?126065&en
Views: 85 European Law
Constitution made easy 10 (citizenship)(PART-II)(Article 5-11
 
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Definition of article -5 and it's possible questions
How tall can the European Convention on Human Rights grow? - Baroness Hale
 
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The pervasive scope of the European Convention of Human Rights has been demonstrated by the furore over the voting rights of prisoners. Is the ECHR a vital cornerstone necessary to protect individual liberties against an encroaching state and the rule of the mob, should it be replaced with a British Bill of Rights or does all Human Rights legislation create more problems than it solves? This lecture will look at whether the ECHR can continue in its current form and how it might be developed in response to discussion about parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the on the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/beanstalk-or-living-instrument-how-tall-can-the-european-convention-on-human Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. http://www.gresham.ac.uk
Views: 13926 Gresham College
Human Rights, Article 10 Of the Constitution.
 
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The Universal Declaration of Human Rights 10 December, Human Rights, Article 10 of The Constitution...
Views: 71 Law Firm
Fracking supporters Humberside Police assault pedestrians walking near Rathlin Energy site
 
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11th May 2019 - Sgt 1574 and Inspector 1108 - Humberside corrupt police force assaults pedestrians walking near Rathlin Energy Acid Fracking and Radioactive waste disposal site in East Riding of Yorkshire. The Corporate facilitation through force appears to be standard policy for Humberside Police who refuse to allow any protest action at the site in contravention of Article 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights. Apparently assaulting you is protecting your Article 2 human rights according to this deranged Sergeant.
Views: 591 Steve Spy
Article 10
 
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RRRT UDHR PSA
Views: 232 RRRTpacific
fundamental rights article 11 to 15 of constitution of pakistan 1973 in urdu and hindi
 
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Whatsapp # +923046671675 Email address [email protected] [email protected] Website www.lawschoolofficial.blogspot.com Facebook www.facebook.com/lawschoolofficial https://plus.google.com/109575231597284486665 www.pinterest.com/lawschoolofficial/ https://www.instagram.com/lawschoolofficial/ fundamental rights article 11 to 15 of constitution of pakistan 1973 in urdu and hindi Fundamental Rights 11 Slavery, forced labour, etc. prohibited (1) Slavery is non-existent and forbidden and no law shall permit or facilitate its introduction into Pakistan in any form. (2) All forms of forced labour and traffic in human beings are prohibited. (3) No child below the age of fourteen years shall be engaged in any factory or mine or any other hazardous employment. (4) Nothing in this Article shall be deemed to affect compulsory service:- (a) by any person undergoing punishment for an offence against any law; or (b) Required by any law for public purpose provided that no compulsory service shall be of a cruel nature or incompatible with human dignity. 12 Protection against retrospective punishment (1) No law shall authorize the punishment of a person:- (a) for an act or omission that was not punishable by law at the time of the act or omission; or (b) for an offence by a penalty greater than, or of a kind different from, the penalty prescribed by law for that offence at the time the offence was committed. (2) Nothing in clause (1) or in Article 270 shall apply to any law making acts of abrogation or subversion of a Constitution in force in Pakistan at any time since the twenty-third day of March, one thousand nine hundred and fifty-six, an offence. 13 Protection against double punishment and self incrimination. No person:- (a) shall be prosecuted or punished for the same offence more than once; or (b) shall, when accused of an offence, be compelled to be a witness against himself. 14 Inviolability of dignity of man, etc. (1) The dignity of man and, subject to law, the privacy of home, shall be inviolable. (2) No person shall be subjected to torture for the purpose of extracting evidence. 15 Freedom of movement, etc. Every citizen shall have the right to remain in, and, subject to any reasonable restriction imposed by law in the public interest, enter and move freely throughout Pakistan and to reside and settle in any part thereof. I am the student of Law and this is my channel which is all about Law. Purpose of this channel is to help out all law students. Law subjects are not easy subjects especially for new comers. I tried my best to describe all things in easy way and hoping that all videos books are very easy and understood not only for law students but also for a common man. These video books will include all law subjects of Pakistan and India as like Pakistan penal code 1860 Indian penal code 1860 Tort Equity Contract Act Criminal procedure code Civil procedure code Evidence Sources of Law jurisprudence Constitutional Law Constitution of different countries and many other subjects Language of video Books is English, Urdu and Hindi
Views: 4541 Law school
Human Rights Article 6
 
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Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article Video
Views: 826 mankindrightsgroup
Article 10 Sess 6
 
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Views: 13 Roland Hearn
UDHR Universal Declaration Of Human Rights Article 10
 
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UDHR Universal Declaration Of Human Rights Article 10
Views: 177 steven alves
Human Right Article 10
 
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Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization founded in 2001 by Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, an educator born and raised in apartheid South Africa, where she witnessed firsthand the devastating effects of discrimination and the lack of basic human rights. The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. YHRI has now grown into a global movement, including hundreds of groups, clubs and chapters around the world. Our human rights videos and curricula fill the schoolrooms and halls of learning with the simple messages of what our human rights are. We realize the importance of collaborating with like-minded individuals and groups to expand our horizons and learn from them their hard-earned lessons, and so expand and reach youth on all continents. For further information about Youth for Human Rights International, contact: 1920 Hillhurst Ave. #416 Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA Phone: USA +1 (323) 663-5799 Or visit our website: http://www.youthforhumanrights.org/
Cheshire Police attempt to abuse of Section 35 Anti Social Behaviour Act in Upton Cheshire
 
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16th January 2016 - Cheshire Police attempt to abuse the Anti Social Behaviour Act in an attempt to stop peaceful protest, a breach of Articles 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights. They also fail to read their own paperwork that states that this section cannot be used to exclude someone from the area that they live in. This video demonstrates that they have no power to serve the section on you if you simply ignore them and walk away.
Views: 11535 Steve Spy
Human Rights - Lecture 4 - International Convention on Civil and Political Rights, 1966
 
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Nitin Gaurav Srivastava and more top educators are teaching live on Unacademy Plus. Subscribe today https://unacademy.com/plus Overview of Important articles under the Covenant For more lessons and courses from Nitin Gaurav Srivastava: https://unacademy.com/user/nitin.gaurav/courses Download the Unacademy Learning App here: Android: https://goo.gl/02OhYI iOS: https://goo.gl/efbytP Do Subscribe and be a part of the community for more such lessons here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL2tFT6UES5v53rbt45BH_Q?sub_confirmation=1
Article 9  UN Human Rights
 
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This digital story was created as part of the Whittier College Denmark Study Abroad course in collaboration with Metropolitan University College in Copenhagen.
ECHR rules in Perincek Armenian 'genocide' case
 
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STRASBOURG, FRANCE - OCTOBER 15: Dogu Perincek, chairman of the Turkish Patriotic Party is seen in the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France on October 15, 2015. The European Court of Human Rights has said a Turkish politician who denied Armenian ‘genocide’ allegations had his right to freedom of expression breached. The case, referred last year to the ECHR, concerns Dogu Perincek who had been found guilty of racial discrimination in Switzerland for describing the Armenian deaths as an "international lie". On Thursday, the ECHR decided by a majority that there had been a violation of Article 10 (freedom of expression) of the European Convention on Human Rights. -
Views: 347 VideoNews
Article 10 Sess 7
 
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Views: 9 Roland Hearn
Article 8  Public interest did not require the removal on ground of right to respect for family life
 
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1. Article 8 - Public interest did not require the removal on ground of right to respect for family life in Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights 2. Eviction of Tenant - New consultation to make it harder to evict tenant for Short-notice eviction or no-fault evection 3. Carer visa - recent Case law - adult primary carer of her EU citizen parent 4. Tribunal sends immigration adviser for OISC investigation - 100 abusive judicial review applications 5. Couples face 'insulting' checks in sham marriage crackdown
Views: 1675 LawWithN Rahman
Brian Haw - I'm going to Court on Monday
 
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www.crazat!ons.tv Brian Haw began a protest against the sanctions on Iraq in Parliament Square, London on June 2nd, 2001. more than 8 years later, he is still there. Although there are many laws that cover violent protests, there was no way for the Government to stop this peaceful protest. The Serious Organised Crime and Police Act was passed in April, 2005, in an effort to stop Brian, but his protest started before this law - so he is exempt. In fact, everyone is. The European Convention on Human Rights states: Article 10 - Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. Article 11 - Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly. Article 17 - No Government can interfere with these Rights. Visit Brian Haw's Websites for more information: brianhaw.blogspot.com www.parliament-square.org.uk On Monday 1st September 2008, Brian Haw was in The City of Westminster Magistrates' Court, before Judge Michael Snow, to face trumped-up charges that could send him to jail for 2 years! This short film is the story of what happened that day - It contains material that was recorded inside the Courtroom - contrary to a government Statute - however, this material was lawfully recorded in the Public Interest, under the long-established principle of Journalistic Privilege. Love, Peace, Justice, for All "Brian Haw - I'm going to Court on Monday" a film by Ne!l Kerslake for www.crazations.tv music: "The Truth wil set you Free (Court Edit)" written and performed by Alasdair, of the clan MacMillan
Views: 8342 crazations
Cheshire police refuse to confirm their oath of office
 
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9th October 2015 - Cheshire police choose to give priority to a motor vehicle on a "cow path", allowed under Council planning permission for agricultural use. The seismic testing being attempted does not come under "agricultural" definitions, so the use of the cow path breaches planning permission. Cheshire police fail to recognise they have sworn an oath to protect the human right of the people including articles 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights.
Views: 1516 Steve Spy
Medical Law 1 - Human Rights Act 1998
 
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Medical Ethics lecture on Human Rights Act 1998 *UK LAW* - Essential for PLAB Covers: 1. What is the human rights act? 2. Why does the human rights act apply to doctors? 3. Absolute vs Limited Rights 4. Article 2 – Right to Life 5. Article 3 – Prohibition of Torture, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment 6. Article 8 – Right to Respect for Private and Family Life 7. Article 9 – Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion 8. Article 12 – Right to Mary and Found a Family 9. Article 14 – Right to Protect from Discrimination Medical Lectures and OSCE Videos produced by GMC registered/Certified Doctors. JHP Medical website provides access to online questions, videos and lecture notes. Lectures cover definitions, aetiology, symptoms, clinical features, management, prognosis and complications of a wide variety of medical topics. Also covered are medical statistics, ethics and law. Authors: 1. Dr. A. Hart-Pinto MBChB (Hons) BSc (Hons) 2. Dr. Najeebah Jaunbocus MBChB MRCGP Lectures are recommended for the following audience: Medical students, nursing students, physician assistants, nursing consultants, nursing staff, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, paramedics, first responders, EMT. Lectures cover high yield topics for the following: Medical Finals, Nursing examinations, USMLE, MRCS, MRCP, MRCGP, MCAT, Medical School Interviews, MCAT, PLAB, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, MCCEE, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP.
Views: 807 JHP Medical UK
The ECHR & the rights of EU citizens in the UK
 
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Roundtable discussion at the British Academy, organised by the Brunel University London-based think tank 'Britain in Europe' (www.BRinEurope.com) and the 'Knowing our Rights' research project (@KnowingOurRts), on Human Rights after Brexit' The first part of the debate - available to watch in this video - examines issues related to the rights of EU citizens in the UK after Brexit, with a focus on the role of Articles 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights for the protection of such rights. The video features key contributions from Anniveresary Chair in Law at QMU, Prof Sionaidh Douglas-Scott, and the deputy legal adviser at the Joint Committee on Human Rights, Alexander Horne. The debate is chaired by the acclaimed legal commentator, Joshua Rozenberg QC, who offers reflection on the topics debated. Other contributors in this part of the roundtable include Sir Geoffrey Nice QC (Britain in Europe), Mary Honeyball MEP, Prof Tim Wilson (Northumbria University), Dr Merris Amos (QMU), Anthony Inglese CB (Brunel University London) and Dr Dimitrios Kagiaros (University of Edinburgh). The event starts with Dr Dimitrios Giannoulopoulos (Brunel University London & Director, Britain in Europe) setting the scene for the debate, and giving an overview of the 'Knowing our Rights' project. To help you through the debate: Around 10 minutes in, Joshua Rozenberg offers first thoughts on the potential effect of Brexit on the European Convention on Human Rights. 11 min 50: discussion of the report of the Joint Committee of Human Rights (JCHR), on the human rights implications of Brexit. Alex Horne gives the background to the JCHR report. 15 min: the view of the JCHR on the effect of Art 8 ECHR, and the impracticality of any course of action that would lead to denying EU citizens their rights. 19 min: Prof Douglas-Scott discusses EU residence rights, pointing out that government officials have not been forthcoming with information about this and so we have considerable uncertainty. 21 min 50: Application of Art 8 ECHR in cases where EU residents might be deported would depend on the extent to which EU residents had been sufficiently embedded within UK life. The more embedded people are, the stronger their Art 8 claim would be. But the Government could argue there are limitations. The less embedded EU citizens are, the easier it might be for Government to establish these limitations. 25 min: Mary Honeyball MEP argues immigration was a key driver in the Referendum, and so real vigilence is required on EU citizens' rights. 27 min: discussion of clauses introduced at the House of Lords to protect EU citizens' rights. Alex Horne reflects on developments with these clauses in the House of Commons and the House of Lords. 33 min: Dr Dimitrios Kagiaros draws the analogy with the Supreme Court ruling on minimun income and foreign spouses, predicting that a similar rule might apply to EU citizens' rights. 34 min: Art 14 ECHR can also come into play. Significant issues relating to discrimination, concerning, e.g., the cut off point selected, after which the rights of EU nationals would not be protected. 36 min: Alex Horne explains that the JCHR took issue with the impracticality of not recognising EU citizens' rights, and the risk that the Court system would collapse. 38 min: Prof Tim Wilson reinforces the point about the risk that Courts would be overwhelmed, making reference to evidence presented to the House of Lords Constitutional Committee, by the President of the Tribunals and immigration lawyers, showing that the immigration system is a mess. Trying to deal with 3 million people that have rights under the ECHR would bring the Courts' system to a complete stop. The Government might have to accept an amendment to escape from its own rhetoric. 39 min: Joshua Rozenberg follows up on Prof Wilson, noting that perhaps the whole issue of EU residents' rights is a red herring. 41 min 50: Mary Honeyball says that that there are not going to be deportations. The Government has adopted this strange negotiating position simply to maintain the status quo. Politically it is not possible to push EU citizens out of the country. End of Part I on EU residents' rights.
Views: 930 Britain in Europe
Human Right Article 6
 
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Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) is a nonprofit organization founded in 2001 by Dr. Mary Shuttleworth, an educator born and raised in apartheid South Africa, where she witnessed firsthand the devastating effects of discrimination and the lack of basic human rights. The purpose of YHRI is to teach youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspire them to become advocates for tolerance and peace. YHRI has now grown into a global movement, including hundreds of groups, clubs and chapters around the world. Our human rights videos and curricula fill the schoolrooms and halls of learning with the simple messages of what our human rights are. We realize the importance of collaborating with like-minded individuals and groups to expand our horizons and learn from them their hard-earned lessons, and so expand and reach youth on all continents. For further information about Youth for Human Rights International, contact: 1920 Hillhurst Ave. #416 Los Angeles, CA 90027, USA Phone: USA +1 (323) 663-5799 Or visit our website: http://www.youthforhumanrights.org/
What is FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION? What does FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION mean?
 
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What is FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION? What does FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION mean? FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION meaning - FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION definition - FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Freedom of association encompasses both an individual's right to join or leave groups voluntarily, and the right of the group to take collective action to pursue the interests of its members. Freedom of Association, The Essentials of Human Rights describes the right as coming together with other individuals to collectively express, promote, pursue and/or defend common interests. Freedom of Association is both an individual right and a collective right, guaranteed by all modern and democratic legal systems, including the United States Bill of Rights, article 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and international law, including articles 20 and 23 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work by the International Labour Organization also ensures these rights. Freedom of association is manifested through the right to join a trade union, to engage in free speech or to participate in debating societies, political parties, or any other club or association, including religious denominations and organizations, fraternities, and sport clubs. It is closely linked with freedom of assembly, particularly under the U.S. Bill of Rights. Freedom of assembly is typically associated with political contexts. However, (e.g. the U.S. Constitution, human rights instruments, etc.) the right to freedom of association may include the right to freedom of assembly. The courts and delegated officers of local jurisdictions may, however, impose restrictions on any of the rights of a convicted criminal as a condition of a legal stipulation. Rights to freedom of association and freedom of assembly are waived under certain circumstances, such as a guilty plea or conviction, restraining orders and probationer's search and seizure procedures.
Views: 530 The Audiopedia
We Are All Born Free & Equal
 
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We Are All Born Free & Equal The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European convention on human rights (ECHR), was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. All Council of Europe member states are party to the Convention and new members are expected to ratify the convention at the earliest opportunity. The Convention established the European Court of Human Rights. Any person who feels their rights have been violated under the Convention by a state party can take a case to the Court; the decisions of the Court are legally binding, and the Court has the power to award damages. The establishment of a Court to protect individuals from human rights violations is an innovative feature for an international convention on human rights, as it gives the individual an active role on the international arena (traditionally, only states are considered actors in international law). The European Convention is still the only international human rights agreement providing such a high degree of individual protection. State parties can also take cases against other state parties to the Court, although this power is rarely used. The Convention has several protocols. For example, Protocol 6 prohibits the death penalty except in time of war. The protocols accepted vary from State Party to State Party, though it is understood that state parties should be party to as many protocols as possible. Prior to the entry into force of Protocol 11, individuals did not have direct access to the Court; they had to apply to the European Commission of Human Rights, which if it found the case to be well-founded would launch a case in the Court on the individual's behalf. Furthermore, when ratifying the Convention, States could opt not to accept the specific clause providing individual access to the Commission, thus limiting the possibility of jurisdictional protection for individuals. Protocol 11 abolished the Commission, enlarged the Court (assigning to it functions and powers which were previously held by the Commission), and allowed individuals to take cases directly to it. By ratifying Protocol 11, all state parties accepted the jurisdiction of the Court to rule over cases brought against them by individuals.
Views: 5556 ant20007
Activist Armour - A Brief Layman's Guide to your Rights & the Law
 
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As promised here is a run down of the pieces of Legislation, Case Law, Constitutional Law and other information I use to protect myself against attempts at intimidation, harassment and threats from the authorities. Remember, I'm not a legal expert, so please don't consider this video as official legal advice. I am just an individual who had educated myself on the relevant information. Thus, just like with all my stuff I urge you not to take this on faith, but to use it as inspiration to do your own research. Every activist and in fact every individual in society needs to educate themselves on the relevant laws and their application to protect themselves against those in uniform who try to abuse their power. I hope you enjoy it. :) And in case you miss any of the links, here they all are in order of their mention: Article 10 Human Rights Act 1998 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/42/schedule/1/part/I/chapter/9 Public Order Act 1986 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1986/64 Lawful Megaphone Use Ruling http://www.5rb.com/docs/Huntingdon%20Life%20Science-v-SHAC%20QB%2015%20Mar%202007.pdf Metropolitan Police Photography Advice http://www.met.police.uk/about/photography.htm Article 3 Human Rights Act 1998 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/42/schedule/1/part/I/chapter/2 Article 5 Human Rights Act 1998 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/42/schedule/1/part/I/chapter/4 Article 11 Human Rights Act 1998 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/42/schedule/1/part/I/chapter/10 Public Order Legislation Gude http://library.npia.police.uk/docs/npia/National-public-order-Legislation-Guide-v4-2011.pdf Section 44 Terrorism Act 2000 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/11/section/44 Article 8 Human Rights Act 1998 (European Convention of Human Rights) http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1998/42/schedule/1/part/I/chapter/7 Environmental Protection Act 1990 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990/43/contents Part 3 Environmental Protection Act 1990 http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990/43/part/III Bill of Rights 1689 http://www.constitution.org/eng/eng_bor.htm
Views: 2885 Adam Antium
ECHR rules in Perincek Armenian 'genocide' case
 
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STRASBOURG, FRANCE - OCTOBER 15: Dogu Perincek, chairman of the Turkish Patriotic Party speaks to the press following case in the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France on October 15, 2015. The European Court of Human Rights has said a Turkish politician who denied Armenian ‘genocide’ allegations had his right to freedom of expression breached. The case, referred last year to the ECHR, concerns Dogu Perincek who had been found guilty of racial discrimination in Switzerland for describing the Armenian deaths as an "international lie". On Thursday, the ECHR decided by a majority that there had been a violation of Article 10 (freedom of expression) of the European Convention on Human Rights. -
Views: 521 VideoNews
A History of America's Freedom of Assembly: 40 Protests and Demonstrations (2003)
 
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Freedom of assembly, sometimes used interchangeably with the freedom of association, is the individual right or ability of people to come together and collectively express, promote, pursue, and defend their ideas.[1] The right to freedom of association is recognized as a human right, a political right and a civil liberty. The terms freedom of assembly and freedom of association may be used to distinguish between the freedom to assemble in public places and the freedom to join an association. Freedom of assembly is often used in the context of the right to protest, while freedom of association is used in the context of labor rights and in the Constitution of the United States is interpreted to mean both the freedom to assemble and the freedom to join an association. The United States Constitution explicitly provides for 'the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances' in the First Amendment. The freedom of assembly is written about in the following human rights instruments: Universal Declaration of Human Rights – Article 20 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights – Article 21 European Convention on Human Rights – Article 11 American Convention on Human Rights – Article 15 Examples of the national and regional constitutions recognizing the freedom of assembly are: Bangladesh – Articles 37 and 38 of the Constitution of Bangladesh guarantee the freedom of association and assembly.[3] Brazil – Article 5 Canada – S. 2 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms which forms part of the Constitution Act, 1982 France – Article 431-1 of the Nouveau Code Pènal Germany – Article 8 GG (Grundgesetz, Basic Law) Hong Kong Basic Law Section 27 Hungary – Article VIII (1) of the Fundamental Law India – Fundamental Rights in India Italy – Article 17 of the Constitution[4] Japan – Article 21 Macau Basic Law Article 27 Constitution of the Philippines Article III, Section 4 Republic of Ireland – Guaranteed by Article 40.6.1 of the Constitution of Ireland South Africa Bill of Rights – Article 17 Spain – Article 21 of the Spanish Constitution of 1978 Turkey – Articles 33 and 34 of the Constitution of Turkey guarantee the freedom of association and assembly. Taiwan (Republic of China) – Article 14 guarantees freedom of assembly and association. United States – First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States Malaysia – Article 10 of the Constitution of Malaysia New Zealand – section 16 New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 Russia – Articles 30 and 31 of the Constitution of Russia guarantee the freedom of association and peaceful assembly. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_assembly
Views: 116 Way Back
For Theo
 
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http://michellemalkin.com/2006/02/04/dont-forget-buy-danish/ Freedom of speech is being able to speak freely without censorship. The right to freedom of speech is guaranteed under international law through numerous human-rights instruments, notably under Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, although implementation remains lacking in many countries. The synonymous term freedom of expression is sometimes preferred, since the right is not confined to verbal speech but is understood to protect any act of seeking, receiving and imparting information or ideas, regardless of the medium used. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_speech Buy Danish go to: http://michellemalkin.com/2006/02/04/dont-forget-buy-danish/ Original song: For Theo Performed by:SUSPENDEDKUFFAR
Views: 707 SUSPENDEDKUFFAR