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Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 528918 Khan Academy
Relationship between Bond Price & Interest Rate
 
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This video will help you understand the relationship between interest rate and the value of a bond. This video will clear your logic for why is it negative for the bond market when interest rate rises. Why is there an inverse relationship Interest Rate & Bond Price. Please leave us a comment/suggestion on our video and do hit "LIKE" if you like the video. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL FOR FULL ACCESS TO ALL OUR VIDEOS ABOUT US: Ambition Learning Solutions is a preemptive training institute providing trainings to undergraduates, post graduates and working professionals on various international certification programs like Certified Financial Planner (CFP), Certified Credit Research Analyst (CCRA), Basics of Financial Markets, Macro Economic Indicators impacting the Financial Markets, Derivatives Market, Technical Analysis, Credit Research, Commercial Banking, Investment Banking, Financial Modeling, Advance Excel, Equity Research, Diploma in Banking and Finance (DBF), NSE's Certified Capital Market Professional (NCCMP) etc. We assist corporate by providing qualified human resources for their operation and expansion requirement. We train their existing staff to furnish them with the latest updates and techniques in their respective domains. Reach us at: Website: www.ambitionlearning.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ambitionlearning/ Email: [email protected] Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=67196015&trk=wvmp-profile
Why Bond Prices and Yields are Inversely Related
 
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Help us make better videos: http://www.informedtrades.com/donate Trade stocks and bonds with Scottrade, the broker Simit uses: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT (see our review: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT2) KEY POINTS 1. Bond prices and bond yields move in opposite directions. When bond prices go up, that means yields are going down; when bond prices go down, this means yields are going up. Mathematically, this is because yield is equal to: annual coupon payments/price paid for bond A decrease in price is thus a decrease in the denominator of the equation, which in turn results in a larger number. 2. Conceptually, the reason for why a decrease in bond price results in an increase bond yields can be understood through an example. a. Suppose a corporation issues a bond to a bondholder for $100, and with a promise of $5 in coupon payments per year. This bond thus has a yield of 5%. ($5/$100 = 5%) b. Suppose the same corporation then issues additional bonds, also for $100 but this time promising $6 in coupon payments for year -- and thus yielding 6%. No rational investor would choose the old bond; instead, they would all purchase the new bond, because it yielded more and was at the same price. As a result, if a holder of the old bonds needed to sell them, he/she would need to do so at a lower price. For instance, if holder of the old bonds was willing to sell it at $83.33, than any prospective buyer would get a bond that earned $5 in coupon payments on an $83.33 payment -- effectively an annual yield of 6% (5/83.33). The yield to maturity could be even higher, since the bond would give the bondholder $100 upon reaching maturity. 3. The longer the duration of the bonds, the more sensitivity there is to interest rate moves. For instance, if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 30 year bond (meaning there are 27 years left until maturity) the price of the bond would fall more than if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 5 year bond. This is because an interest in interest rates reduces the relative appeal of existing coupon payments, and the more coupon payments that are remaining, the more interest rate fluctuations will impact the price of the bond. 4. Lastly, a small note on jargon: when investors or commentators say, "bonds are up," (or down) they are referring to bond prices. "Bonds are up" thus means bond prices are up and yields are down; conversely, "bonds are down" means bond prices are down and yields are up.
Views: 62526 InformedTrades
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 46157 tutor2u
Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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How a bond works, how bond prices change inversely with interest rates, and how open market operations by the FED influence interest rates and the economy.
Views: 44164 TheWyvern66
Bond Price | Bond Yield | Interest Rate | Inflation | Oil Prices | FDI/FPI | Banks SLR | M K Yadav
 
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To download the Handouts, Please Join https://t.me/currentaffairsmkyadav The video Explains the relationship between Bond Price, Bond Yield, Interest Rate, SLR, Inflation, Oil Prices, FDI/FPI
Views: 3106 MK Yadav - theIAShub
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 79890 Investopedia
Bonds Effective Interest Method - Discount
 
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This video explains how to calculate a bond that sells at a discount. It shows the corresponding journal entries on the original sale and interest payments. It also shows how to prepare the amortization table and explains what the numbers represent.
Views: 26269 mattfisher64
What does Coupon Rate mean?
 
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The coupon rate is the annual interest rate paid on a bond. It is represented as a percentage of the bond's face value. This video provides a brief explanation of what coupon rate means, and provides a visual example of how it is typically used and calculated. Learn more at: http://marketbusinessnews.com/financial-glossary/coupon-rate/
Views: 6020 MBN Video Dictionary
Bond Price and Bond Yields - Simplified | Money and Banking Part 3.1 | Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
Views: 27446 NEO IAS
Is It a Bad Idea to Buy Bonds When Interest Rates Are Going Up?
 
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http://IncredibleRetirement.com 800-393-1017 Here’s something I bet you didn't know. The U.S. stock market, the size of the U.S. stock market is about $30 trillion. If you added up the value of all publicly traded stocks in the U.S., the market value of all those companies would come up to around $30 trillion, but what about bonds? Bonds are hardly ever mentioned or talked about in the financial media, but I bet you might be surprised to discover that the U.S. bond market is actually much bigger than the stock market. The U.S. bond market is estimated to be $40 trillion or more. That's right, the bond market is actually larger than the stock market and yet the financial media has almost all their attention and therefore our attention on the stock market. So what about bonds? Should you be buying bonds when interest rates are going up? You may have heard that when interest rates go up, bond values go down, which is true. Think of a seesaw or a teeter totter, the end that goes up is interest rates and the end that goes down is the underlying value of the bond. Bonds by the way are nothing more than a loan to a company or government or government agency. Typically bonds pay their interest twice a year, every six months, and when the loan comes due, they have a maturity date which could range anywhere from 90 days to 30 years, when you get your money back. If you look at long term returns of investments, let's say 15 year timeframe or longer, then it's no secret stocks have outperformed bonds by a large, large margin; so if stocks do better than bonds over the long term why not just have all of your money in stocks? Well the problem is while stocks tend to deliver nice, long term returns, but the short term oh, that could be a whole other story. Stocks on the short term can be extremely volatile. Just look what happened in the financial crisis of 2008. The S&P 500, the 500 largest publically traded companies in America, lost about 38% in value. So $100,000 in the S&P 500 at the end of 2008 was now worth $62,000. Ouch! That's a lot of short term volatility which tends to make you and I uncomfortable, to say the least. So how do we dampen or minimize that volatility? Imagine you have a sailboat and you have entered it into a race. One way to make your sailboat go faster is to make it lighter. But the lighter the sailboat, the more likely it is to capsize with a gust of wind. To prevent that you add weight or ballast to the sailboat. That slows the speed of the boat down but it reduces the odds of the boat capsizing and sinking. This is how you should think of bonds in your overall investment strategy. They are going to slow down the overall growth of your investment accounts but they are there to keep you from capsizing, to keep you from sinking during short-term periods of market volatility. So the answer to the question should you buy bonds, even when interest rates are going up, as a long term investor, the answer is a qualified yes, and here's what I mean by that. If you buy individual bonds and hold the bond until it matures or is called away early by the issuer then you'll receive the interest and get all your money back when the bond matures. The value of the bond can and will fluctuate while you own it, but it doesn't affect you if you hold it to maturity because then you get all your money back. This is why it's important to own individual bonds, especially in a rising interest rate environment, you don't lose money if you hold the bond until maturity. Why not just use a bond mutual fund? The problem with a bond mutual fund is it doesn't have a maturity date. People are constantly adding or withholding money from the mutual fund itself and typically at the wrong time. In a rising interest rate market, a lot of people in bond mutual funds take some or all of their money out of the mutual fund which forces the mutual fund manager to sell bonds even if they didn't want to. They have to generate the money to pay back the investors and that could drive the value or the price of bonds down even further. Ideally, you want to use individual bonds so you know for sure you get your money back when the bond matures. If you have a small account, and I would say a small account would be $200,000 or less, then you may not have enough money to properly diversify into individual bonds and you may have to still use bond mutual funds and if that's the case in a rising interest rate market you want to focus on short term bond funds or floating rate bond funds. Buying individual bonds as part of your investment strategy will help you move one step closer to experiencing your version of an incredible retirement doing what you want, when you want.
Views: 1076 Brian Fricke
Bonds & Yields - part 3 (Hindi), Inflation vs Interest rates, बॉन्ड्स और यील्ड - 3
 
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This video explains the relationship between inflation and interest rates along with bond prices and rates. This video explains inflation and its effect on interest earned by investors. यह विडियो महंगाई दर और इंटरेस्ट रेट के बीच के सम्बन्ध को समझाता है, की किस प्रकार से महंगाई दर के बढ़ने और घटने का असर इंटरेस्ट रेट आदि पर पड़ता है.
Views: 8873 Rajiv Dharmadhikari
PART 2--BOND PRICES VS INTEREST RATES
 
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THIS IS SHORT VIDEO OF ECONOMICS DICTIONARY IN HINDI
Views: 1644 Ideal Coaching
What Happens to My Bonds When Interest Rates Rise?
 
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With interest rate hikes and indications that there will be further increases this year, we've been receiving questions about the impact of rising interest rates on a bond portfolio. In this video, Pure Financial's Director of Research, Brian Perry, CFP®, CFA® answers the question, "what will happen to my bond portfolio when interest rates rise?" If you would like to schedule a free assessment with one of our CFP® professionals, click here: https://purefinancial.com/lp/free-assessment/ Make sure to subscribe to our channel for more helpful tips and stay tuned for the next episode of “Your Money, Your Wealth.” http://bit.ly/2FDSfK2 Channels & show times: http://yourmoneyyourwealth.com https://purefinancial.com IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: • Investment Advisory and Financial Planning Services are offered through Pure Financial Advisors, Inc. A Registered Investment Advisor. • Pure Financial Advisors Inc. does not offer tax or legal advice. Consult with their tax advisor or attorney regarding specific situations. • Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance. • Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. • All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. • Intended for educational purposes only and are not intended as individualized advice or a guarantee that you will achieve a desired result. Before implementing any strategies discussed you should consult your tax and financial advisors.
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 245538 Khan Academy
Interest rates rise when bond prices fall
 
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Interest rates go up and the price of the bonds go down. A quick illustration to help you understand that concept.
Views: 1799 That Bond Guy
How Do Interest Rates Affect Bonds?
 
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The traditional view of bonds as safe places to stash money you’ll soon need to access doesn’t square with the current rising-interest-rate environment. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a retail investor in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a low-risk asset class in which to stash some of it, and that bonds are among the best options of that type. But -- with deepest thanks and apologies to Jane Austen -- universally acknowledged truths sometimes turn out to be false, under certain circumstances. Case in point, from deep in this month's Motley Fool Answers mailbag comes a query from a listener who was disturbed to read an article in The New York Times asserting that corporate debt is experiencing a valuation bubble, and that bond funds have become a riskier place to invest than most people recognize. Is this true, he asks, and if so, what should an investor do in response? To answer, special guest Buck Hartzell, director of Investor Learning and Operations at The Motley Fool, joins hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp in this segment. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 353 The Motley Fool
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 292863 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Relationship Between Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rates.
Views: 10952 Practical Money Skills
Why Bond Prices Go Down When Interest Rates Go Up
 
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The Ole Captain does what most economists and finance professors can't do, and explains the inverse relationship between bond prices and interest rates to NORMAL PEOPLE. Visit Cappy's other sites for rants, rage, and Super Awesome Economic Genius! http://captaincapitalism.blogspot.com http://aaron-clarey.podomatic.com http://www.assholeconsulting.com
Views: 4297 AaronClarey
3 Minutes! Bond Valuation Explained and How to Value a Bond
 
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OMG wow! Clicked here http://mbabullshit.com I'm shocked how easy, bond valuation video.. What is a Bond? Basically, a bond is a certificate which proves that a company borrowed money from you and now owes you money. Owning a bond is a way to earn interest payments instead of putting your money in a bank. Therefore, if a bond can give you high interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, a bond value should be high. On the other hand, if a bond will give you small coupon payments compared to bank interest, the bond value should be low. A bond can be bought either from the original company which issues the bond, or from people who already bought the bond from the corporation, but who want to sell the bond before it expires because they don’t want to wait too long before they get back their original investment So to find the theoretical value of a bond, we need to think about the bond’s interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, the bond’s face value, and the length of time before maturity when you get back the full face value of the bond. Sears Bond photo credit: Tom Spree via Wikipedia Creative Commons
Views: 88032 MBAbullshitDotCom
Khan Academy - Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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Khan Academy on Bond Prices and Interest Rates
Views: 150617 Jonathan Horn
Bond Pricing on the Term Structure of Interest Rates with Expected Inflation Rate Changes
 
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Consider the following spot interest rates for maturities of one, two, three, and four years. Year | Rate 1 | 4% 2 | 5% 3 | 6% 4 | 7% What is the price of a four year, 4 percent coupon bond with a face value of $100? Assume the bond pays an annual coupon. What are our expectations of the yield for a one year bond that starts in one, two, and three years, i.e., what are the forward rates? Suppose the inflation expectations are a constant 2 percent, what are the expected real interest rates for each one year period in the future? Suppose that immediately after purchasing the bond that market expectations of the inflation rate decrease to a constant one percent. What are our new nominal forward rates? Assume expectations of real interest rates have not changed. In one year, what do we expect the new term structure of interest rates to be? In one year, what do we expect the price of the bond to be based on the new term structure of interest rates? What do we expect the holding period return to be if you sell it immediately after receiving the first year’s coupon? Note: There is a typo in calculating the holding period return. The correct formula is (92.22 - 90.17 + 4)/90.17 = 6.7% Note: A pdf of the solution is available from here: https://goo.gl/MeMDkv
Finance: What is the inverse relationship between interest rates and bond values?
 
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When interest rates go up, the principal value of bonds goes...down. If you've ever been on a see-saw, you know what we're talking about here.
Views: 165 Shmoop
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 35503 TheFinCoach
Bonds, Interest Rates, and the Impact of Inflation
 
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This educational video discusses the basics of bonds. People interested in investing should speak with their financial advisor. The video was produced by Mark Matos, a financial advisor in Naples FL. Blog: http://www.globalwealthconsultants.com/Blog.aspx Follow me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mark.matos Google+: https://plus.google.com/+MarkMatos1 Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markamatos Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarkAMatos Music by Chris Zabriskie
Views: 5063 The Rebel Outpost
Here’s How Rising Interest Rates Will Affect the Stock, Bond and Housing Markets
 
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The Federal Reserve is looking to hike short-term interest rates for the first time since June 2006. Uncertainty surrounding the timing of higher rates contributed to the unprecedented market jitters seen in stocks over the past few weeks. ‘A rate hike will be good for savers,’ said Brian Rehling, co-head of global fixed income strategy at Wells Fargo (WFC) Investment Institute. ‘Although the benefit is going to be quite small because the Fed’s going to go very slow here.’ Experts expect the Fed’s to initially hike short-term interest rates by just 25 basis points. ‘Investors should hold modest amounts of cash alternatives to meet near-term liquidity needs and emergency expenses,’ he added. TheStreet’s Scott Gamm reports from New York. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
Relationship between Bond Price n Interest Rate   YouTube
 
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This video explains the relationship between the bond price and interest rates
Interest Rates on Discount Bonds
 
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I show how the bond price and the interest rate are inversely related.
Views: 8819 Mike Fladlien
Why Do Bond Prices Fall When Interest Rates Increase?
 
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How changing interest rates impact fixed income funds and ETFs and what to do about it.
English: Bond Mathematics: Interest Rates and Price (Inverse Relationship and Sensitivity)
 
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India's Bond markets are largely unknown to the retail investor. This is because they are mostly dominated by institutions like banks, mutual funds and insurance companies. However it must be known that within mutual funds, a large part of the industry AUM is in liquid funds, which invest in money market instruments which are essentially very short term debt papers. In this video we try to understand how bond markets move due to changes in interest rates and what mistakes investors should not be making while taking investing decisions in bonds. To know more about our online trainings, call Shailesh: 8600043130. Please write your comments and feedback so that we can incorporate that in our future videos. Thank you for watching
Bonds: Spot Rates vs. Yield to Maturity
 
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What's the difference between a spot rate and a bond's yield-to-maturity? In this video you'll learn how to find the price of the bond using spot rates, as well as how to find the yield-to-maturity of a bond once we know it's price. Simply put, spot rates are used to discount cash flows happening at a particular point in time, back to time 0. A bond's yield-to-maturity is the overall return that the investor will make by purchasing the bond - think of it as a weighted average!
Views: 5391 Arnold Tutoring
Bond Prices, Interest Rate & Yield Changes
 
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When interest rates go up, bond prices go down. Understanding the relationship between bond prices, interest rate changes and the bond's current yield is important for investors.
Views: 4525 InvestingForMe
Fiscal Policy: Introduction to Bond Markets and Interest Rate Determination
 
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One of the least understood topics among introductory Econ students is how bond markets work. This video lesson introduces the bond market, and explains how the demand for a government's debt is an important determination of the borrowing costs faced by that government. We will answer some important questions about bond markets, such as, "What's the relationship between bond prices and bond yields?" and "How could budget deficits and debt affect interest rates?" In the next video we'll examine circumstances under which large budget deficits and national debt may NOT drive up a government's borrowing costs. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 12654 Jason Welker
Interest rates, bond prices, and your portfolio- Vanguard
 
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Vanguard chief economist Joe Davis suggests focusing on your asset allocation and taking market conditions out of the equation when managing your portfolio. Learn more at http://www.vanguard.com © 2013 The Vanguard Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Views: 13550 Vanguard
Valuation 101: How Interest Rates Impact Bonds
 
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And how do fundamentals like inflation and interest rates factor into the investment value equation? In investing, as in so many other arenas, the questions with the most complex answers tend to start with one word — “why.” In this month's Motley Fool Answers mailbag comes a particularly good “why question" from a listener who’s curious about why we gauge the values of companies and assets with the metrics we do, and why different industries and businesses seem to be held to such different standards. To answer, special guest Buck Hartzell, director of Investor Learning and Operations at The Motley Fool, joins hosts Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp. In this segment, he talks about the relative merits of different industries, and the inescapable relationships between inflation rates, interest rates, and risk and reward in investing. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe to The Motley Fool's YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheMotleyFool Or, follow our Google+ page: https://plus.google.com/+MotleyFool/posts Inside The Motley Fool: Check out our Culture Blog! http://culture.fool.com Join our Facebook community: https://www.facebook.com/themotleyfool Follow The Motley Fool on Twitter: https://twitter.com/themotleyfool
Views: 345 The Motley Fool
The Effect of Interest Rates on The Treasury Yield
 
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Let us help you become the smartest investor in the room. Sign up by clicking the link below and get our 100% free E-book now: http://www.fearlesswealth.com/a-better-choice-yt/ Don't Miss Weekly Updates from RC! Click Here to Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpeNTBaLA3xmrKSl7f0tWTA ===================================== It is Independence Day this week and I wanted to talk about how a lot of what independence is about is thinking for yourself, point out things you know that are not right. Sometimes this means you have to be on your own or at least with a small group that is going up against something large. And if you’ve been following me, you know that I’m a firm believe that the long only Big Box approach worked great in the 80’s and 90’s, but just hasn’t been working since 1999. Below you will find seven charts of different treasury yields. Each chart goes back to 1982. In each chart there will be a red dot – where the stock market peaked in 2000 and 2007. And a green dot – where the stock market bottomed after those two recessions. You’ll notice some interesting similarities in all of the 7 treasury yields charts. Also the Fed has less and less control over treasury yields the further and further out you go. So in our examples below the Fed has the most control over the 3 month yield and the least over the 30 year yield. The first chart below is of the 3 month treasury yield. You can see when the peak in yields happens in the early 1980s. Remember that The Feds are the ones that control this yield. The red dots are when the stock market peaked in 2000 and 2007. Notice how much yields fell during those times. In the 2000 Dot Com recession yields full from around 6% to eventually 1%. Similarly in the 2008 recession yields fell from about 5% all the way to 0%. In both recessions the yields fell 5%. So what do you think will happen to this yield when we have our next recession? If we have a recession right now and the Fed drops the yield 5% we’d have a -4% yield on the 3 month treasury. The next chart below is the 6 month treasury yield. You probably notice right away that the two charts look very similar. During each recession shown on the chart the yields drop about 5%. The biggest difference between the two charts are when rates started rising. You can see that the 6 month treasury yield began rising about two years before the 3 month yield. This is because the Fed has less of a reach on the 6 month yield. The point of showing you these charts is that the yield has a lot higher to go before we get into the next recession. It also can show you how absurd the behavior of the Fed has been considering the flatness of the line. This next price chart is of the 1 year treasury yield. Again you can see that the yield peaked right around the same time that the stock market peaked. But right after the stock market bottomed in 2002 the 1 year yield still continued to fall right after. You can see the similarities between the three charts. After each recession the yields dropped about 5%. Notice how steep this yield increases when the stock market goes up. Something that people forget is that yields historically move in the direction that stocks do. The next chart is the 2 year treasury. Again very similar. When the Dot Com recession happened the yield fell 6% and then during the 2008 Global Financial Crisis 5%. As you move further out on the yield curve the Fed has less control over it. This is interesting because after the yield bottomed in 2011, it has been steadily increasing on its own. The Fed didn’t start raising interest rates until December 2015. But the two year treasury which is controlled more by the public and the market, started moving up way before the Fed started moving their interest rates up.
Views: 1343 Fearless Wealth
Bonds | YTM | INTEREST RATES | COUPON | YIELD | HINDI
 
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This video will help in understanding various topics like Bonds, Interest rates, YTM, Coupon Rate, Maturity, Yields, Relation of Interest rates with Bond Price
Views: 211 GeekDonkey
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 361995 Khan Academy
How rising interest rates may impact bonds
 
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Pacer ETFs President Sean O’Hara discusses how rising interest rates are impacting bonds and where investors should allocate their capital.
Views: 1281 Fox Business
Investopedia Video: The Basics Of Bond Duration
 
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Duration tells investors the length of time, in years, that it will take a bond's cash flows to repay the investor the price he or she paid for the bond. A bond's duration also tells investors how much a bond's price might change when interest rates change i.e. how much risk they face from interest rate changes.
Views: 97293 Investopedia
Bond pricing interest rate changes
 
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A look at what happens to bond prices when interest rates change.
Views: 2629 BonaResponds
Chapter 5 - Bond, Bond Valuation & Interest Rates - Lecture 1
 
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Financial Managgement - Chapter 5
Views: 291 Neetu Chopra
Negative Interest Rates & Negative Bond Yields
 
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This video provides a market-based rationale for the occurrence of negative interest rates and bond yields. The discussion focuses on the underlying economic dynamics and technical aspects of fixed income investing to identify the specific drivers of negative rates. The presentation gives somewhat different explanations for negative money market rates versus negative yields on intermediate to long-term bonds. The former having to do with the composition of the money supply, and latter defensive moves by bond portfolio managers. InsidersGuideToFinance.com facebook.com/insidersguidetofinance