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What are Environmental Ethics and Our Moral Responsibilities
 
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We humans exploit the nature considering ourselves to be the most superior beings. We think that the nature is made for us to use, rather than thinking that we are just a part of the nature like all other non-human entities. This is where the need to have environmental ethics arises. Environmental ethics is a branch of environmental philosophy that studies the ethical relationship between human beings and the environment. This field has given a new dimension to the conservation and protection of the environment. Watch this video to know all about environmental ethics, the issues related to it and our moral responsibility towards it. You can read more about environmental ethics here: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/what-is-environmental-ethics.html
Views: 26636 Buzzle
Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic
 
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What causes climate change (also known as global warming)? And what are the effects of climate change? Learn the human impact and consequences of climate change for the environment, and our lives. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Causes and Effects of Climate Change | National Geographic https://youtu.be/G4H1N_yXBiA National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 839053 National Geographic
The Pros and Cons of Organic Farming | Biology  for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhOrIUlrnPo) we looked at the key principles of organic farming - the use of more natural alternatives instead of chemical fertilisers, herbicides and pesticides or feed additives for livestock. This all sounds great, but there is more to the story. Organic farming isn’t all good. The yields are lower because more produce is damaged by pests, and carefully selected chemical pesticides cannot be used. With an ever-growing world population, we have limited land to feed everyone from. So should we therefore just focus on maximising yields? Or to get the same yields, more land would need to be farmed. Where would this surplus land come from - cutting down our remaining forests and rainforests? This would be far worse for the environment both in terms of climate change and biodiversity. A study in the UK found that a litre of organic milk requires 80% more land than conventional milk to produce. That’s a lot more land, and makes you wonder whether organic foods are a luxury the world just cannot afford to provide. Interestingly, it has been found that some organic farming methods require more water than non-organic alternatives; a huge problem as droughts become more regular and water more scarce. Organic is not necessarily better for the environment either. Organic dairy farms do actually produce more methane per cow than conventional farms because of the diet of the cattle: organic cows apparently burp twice as much as conventional cows!! As methane is a greenhouse gas, this does not bode well for global warming. You also need to consider the airmiles of your produce… in the UK most of the organic food is imported, so if there is a conventionally farmed alternative from a local source then it may be better for the environment to opt for that product. Scientists are still fiercely debating whether conventional or organic farming has a larger environmental footprint; so I am not expecting you to have a clear opinion either! It is actually a big misconception that organic farms cannot use any pesticides; they can because without them, the crop yields would be much too low for the farm to be sustained. Organic farmers can use both synthetic and natural kinds of pesticides, but some of the regular pesticide chemicals are banned on organic farms. As fewer chemicals are used, there is less risk of chemicals remaining on the food, which can only be a good thing for consumers. Scientists are still debating the pros and cons of organic farming in comparison to conventional farming, and there is plenty of information you can read online. The tricky part is that most articles are very biased so don’t be swayed by the first article you read. The principles of organic farming are obviously very good for the environment, but in reality yields matter. There is a balance to be found between looking after our soils and environment, and so employing organic strategies such as crop rotations, but having a limited amount of agricultural land and an ever-growing population. Many conventional farmers employ organic strategies to do their best for the soil structure and local biodiversity, but make use of chemicals in the lowest levels possible whilst still maintaining yields. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Air Pollution 101 | National Geographic
 
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What is air pollution? Learn how greenhouse gasses, smog, and toxic pollutants effect climate change, and human health. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Read more in "Air pollution, explained" https://on.natgeo.com/2uIJIBg Air Pollution 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/e6rglsLy1Ys National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 464772 National Geographic
What is Biodiversity & Its Importance? Environmental Science for Kids | Educational Videos by Mocomi
 
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https://mocomi.com/ presents: What is Biodiversity & Its Importance? What is biodiversity and why is it important? Biodiversity is the variety of plants and animals living on Earth, carefully playing an important part in maintaining the balance of nature. The diversity of species is not distributed throughout planet because life depends on many factors including geography. There are thousands upon thousands of plant and animal species on earth. They are all continuously evolving and adapting to the environment around them. Biodiversity is the variety of animals and plants found on this planet including the geographic locations they are found in. This concept is what makes our planet different from others in our solar system and being able experience all these variations first hand is what makes the earth so marvelous. Think of the earth as a perfectly tuned machine with sprockets, springs, and oil (plants, animals and climates) all working to maintain the balance of nature. The diversity of species is not evenly distributed throughout the planet because life depends on factors such as temperature, altitude, precipitation, soil, the presence of other species and geography, since tropical regions support more life than polar regions. Biodiversity is important to sustaining life on earth because it prevents any one species from throwing the balance of nature out of order. For example, snakes are not a welcome presence in our lives. We fear them and kill them because of it. One of the many things that snakes feed on is rats and if we were to kill of all the snakes, we would end up having a terrible rat problem. Therefore humans should to everything in their power to conserve the natural variation of snakes to ensure it doesn’t get an unnatural rat problem. For Example – Tropical regions support more life than polar regions. Watch this video on how we have to preserve this diversity to sustain life on Earth. To learn more about biodiversity, go to: https://mocomi.com/biodiversity/ For more fun learning environment related videos and interactive articles, visit: https://mocomi.com/learn/environment/ Follow Mocomi Kids - Top educational website for kids, on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/mocomikids/ on Twitter https://twitter.com/MocomiKids on Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/mocomikids/ on Google+ https://plus.google.com/+mocomikids/ on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/mocomi-kids
Views: 289273 MocomiKids
OUR ENVIRONMENT-Part 1
 
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http://www.realenglish-online.com/ A short video with vocabulary related to the Environment. From Fce level and up.
Views: 561 REAL ENGLISH Online
Dr. Mercola and Scott Carney on Environmental Conditioning (Full Interview)
 
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In this interview video, natural health expert and Mercola.com founder Dr. Joseph Mercola and Scott Carney, author of "What Doesn't Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength" discuss how environmental conditioning can help boost mitochondrial function and metabolic efficiency. To read health articles, visit Mercola.com. Subscribe for the latest health news: https://articles.mercola.com/subscribe.aspx Visit our website: https://www.mercola.com Listen to our podcasts: https://www.mercola.com/downloads/podcast.htm Find us on Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/doctor.health MeWe: https://mewe.com/p-front/dr.josephmercola Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drmercola Twitter: https://twitter.com/mercola
Views: 12212 Mercola
Climate Change Explained
 
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A straightforward explanation of Climate Change: the heat from human emissions is roughly equal to exploding 400,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs every day. Historically, every time carbon dioxide levels increase in Earth's atmosphere, the average surface temperature increases, ice melts, and the seas rise. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ The New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/28/science/what-is-climate-change.html Music: Dragon and Toast by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100251 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ More info: Follow Paris Climate Summit progress: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/climate/2015-paris-climate-talks/indian-activists-say-climate-solutions-must-consider-indias-need-to-grow Megacities face 20 feet of Sea Rise: http://www.climatecentral.org/news/nations-megacities-face-20-feet-of-sea-level-rise-19217 ITER (thermonuclear experimental reactor): https://www.wikiwand.com/en/ITER Like our page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Join us on Google+ https://plus.google.com/100134925804523235350/posts Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo
Views: 823944 The Daily Conversation
Seeing through the complexity. On Earth's ecosystem | Barbara Pietrzak | TEDxUniversityofWarsaw
 
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Our brains evolved at the time when mankind’s ecological footprint was marginal. Now with humans freely shaping the surface of the Earth the understanding of the global impact of our behaviour is needed. The complexity of ecological interactions is immense and ecologists use most advanced computational tools to uncover and understand their functioning. And while they do, it is enough for us to turn to the very basics of the economy of nature to guide our everyday choices. Barbara Pietrzak, a scientist working at the Faculty of Biology at the University of Warsaw, describes how changing our diet may save the world’s ecosystem and why lowering meat consumption is the single best way to address the challenging ecological concerns. Barbara is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Biology. She works on the broadly understood animal response to threat, as well as ecology and evolution of their behavior and life history, including longevity. She teaches classes at the Faculty of Biology and Artes Liberales on ecology of individuals and ecosystems, global environmental changes and civilization threats. A member of the Spokesmen of Science and Science for Nature associations. She publishes articles, conducts lectures, participates in radio programs and embraces shorter and bolder forms of science popularization such as scientific stand-ups (finalist of FameLab contest). This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 572 TEDx Talks
Science - Environment - Pollution - Hindi
 
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Hello, BodhaGuru Learning proudly presents an animated video in Hindi for children, which explains what pollution is. It also explains about different pollutants and how they are damaging the environment. It discusses about global dangers raised by the pollution like acid rain, global warming. It starts with nice short animated story -- Pradushanmaan, which shows the damages caused by a pollution monster, watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZeSc8gDXmVU About us: We are a social enterprise working on a mission to make school learning interesting, relevant and affordable to every child on this planet. You can watch our FREE online videos at http://www.BodhaGuru.com/watch and download our practice application/games - just visit http://www.BodhaGuru.com/play If you like our videos, subscribe to our channel http://www.youtube.com/user/BodhaGuruLearning. Feel free to connect with us at http://www.facebook.com/BodhaGuru OR http://twitter.com/BodhaGuru Have fun, while you learn. Thanks for watching -- Team BodhaGuru
Views: 220798 Bodhaguru
What is Sustainability? | Mocomi Kids
 
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https://mocomi.com/ presents: What is Sustainability? An informative video on Sustainability, For humans, sustainability is the potential for long-term maintenance of well being, which has ecological, economic, political and cultural dimensions. Here are a few ways in which your actions can contribute to sustainability. Lifestyle - Your lifestyle is your choice and you can change it. For example, when you go to the grocery store, make sure you always carry a cloth bag. This way the shopkeeper does not have to give you many plastic bags. Fixing - If your watch, or a toy, or a camera is broken or not working, try getting it fixed before you buy yourself a new one. Recycle - Try and be conscious about the things around you. When you consume something, see if you can re-use it later. Learn more about how we can contribute to sustainability. To learn more about sustainability, read: https://mocomi.com/sustainability/ For more fun learning videos and interactive articles related to the environment and its issues, visit: https://mocomi.com/learn/environment/ Follow Mocomi Kids - Top educational website for kids, on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/mocomikids/ on Twitter https://twitter.com/MocomiKids on Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/mocomikids/ on Google+ https://plus.google.com/+mocomikids/ on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/mocomi-kids
Views: 313810 MocomiKids
Developmental biology part 1 : introduction and grey crescent formation
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Embryogenesis is the step in the life cycle after fertilisation -- the development of the embryo, starting from the zygote (fertilised egg). Organisms can differ drastically in how the embryo develops, especially when they belong to different phyla. For example, embryonal development in placental mammals starts with cleavage of the zygote into eight uncommited cells, which then form a ball (morula). The outer cells become the trophectoderm or trophoblast, which will form in combination with maternal uterine endometrial tissue the placenta, needed for fetal nurturing via maternal blood, while inner cells become the inner cell mass that will form all fetal organs (the bridge between these two parts eventually forms the umbilical cord). In contrast, the fruit fly zygote first forms a sausage-shaped syncytium, which is still one cell but with many cell nuclei.[18] Patterning is important for determining which cells develop into which organs. This is mediated by signaling between adjacent cells by proteins on their surfaces, and by gradients of signaling secreted molecules.[19] An example is retinoic acid, which forms a gradient in the head to tail direction in animals. Retinoic acid enters cells and activates Hox genes in a concentration-dependent manner -- Hox genes differ in how much retinoic acid they require for activation and will thus show differential rostral expression boundaries, in a colinear fashion with their genomic order. As Hox genes code for transcription factors, this causes different activated combinations of both Hox and other genes in discrete anteroposterior transverse segments of the neural tube (neuromeres) and related patterns in surrounding tissues, such as branchial arches, lateral mesoderm, neural crest, skin and endoderm, in the head to tail direction.This is important for e.g. the segmentation of the spine in vertebrates. Embryonic development does not always proceed correctly, and errors can result in birth defects or miscarriage. Often the reason is genetic (mutation or chromosome abnormality), but there can be environmental influence (like teratogens) or stochastic events. Abnormal development caused by mutation is also of evolutionary interest as it provides a mechanism for changes in body plan (see evolutionary developmental biology). Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 181996 Shomu's Biology
जैव विविधता/BIODIVERSITY
 
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पर्यावरण/Environment https://youtu.be/zoGCI2koEqM ECOLOGY/ECOSYSTEM https://youtu.be/LBL_BSR70IE
Views: 136984 EDU TERIA
How Do Animals Change the Environment? - Things We Don't Know
 
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There is a fascinating connection between living things and the world around us, and as conditions change, organisms change too which can lead to some quite unexpected consequences. If our own species can have such an impact on the environment, how do other animals change it? Visit http://www.thingswedontknow.com/ Join our Discord server: https://discord.gg/3KgpG8J Music by TeknoAxe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RptNjOX7ZGs Subscribe to explore the wonderful life around you! Social Media: ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BenGThomas42 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bengthomas42/ ►Instagram: http://bit.ly/1PIEagv ►Google+: http://bit.ly/1ObHejE Sources: http://www.thingswedontknow.com/articles/keystone+species#.WvQYaWjTWf1 https://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2013/may/16/climate-change-scienceofclimatechange http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/8/2/024024 https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/trophic-cascades-across-diverse-plant-ecosystems-80060347 https://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/keystone-species-15786127 http://d2ouvy59p0dg6k.cloudfront.net/downloads/climatechange16ppfinallo.pdf https://academic.oup.com/aob/article/104/6/1017/184229 https://www.hindawi.com/journals/isrn/2013/187415/
Views: 7465 Ben G Thomas
Changing environmental conditions causes physical and molecular changes in tomatoes
 
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Video summarises D’Esposito et al. "Unraveling the complexity of transcriptomic, metabolomic and quality environmental response of tomato fruit." BMC Plant Biology (2017). Read the original article: https://bmcplantbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12870-017-1008-4
Views: 1858 BMC
Dr. James Greenwood, Editor in Chief of Journal of Environmental Science and Renewable Resources
 
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Dr. James R. Rick Greenwood is working as a Adjunct Professor in UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and Participating Faculty, UCLA Institute for the Environment and Sustainability, University of California, Los Angeles. Journal of Environmental Science and Renewable Resources is an international online open access peer reviewed journal publishes manuscripts focused on latest advancements in environmental sciences and renewable energy technologies. This journal covers environmental biology, pollution, environmental disasters, environmental impacts associated with producing power from renewable sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, and hydropower.
Destruction of the Environment as a Consequence of Overpopulation (Urdu)
 
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Unfortunately, we're getting close to the planet's maximum sustainable population. What are the effects of overpopulation on the environment? This video is based on an article by Billy Eduard Albert Meier entitled "Destruction of the Environment as a Consequence of Overpopulation" and is intended to bring awareness to the increasing problems humanity is and will be facing if we do not take decisive steps to limit our population growth. Special thanks to FIGU-Landesgruppe Canada: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKATEWk-oQE ------------------- A joint Urdu dubbing project of Mashal Books and the Eqbal Ahmad Centre for Public Education with generous support from Nasser Ahmad. ------------------- Urdu Translation: Nayyar Afaq Voice Over: Maria Rubab Technical help: Media 6 ------------------- Please visit our websites and social media pages for more videos, articles, books and other useful material. http://eacpe.org http://twitter.com/eacpe_pk http://www.Facebook.com/EACPE.Official http://mashalbooks.org http://twitter.com/MashalBooks http://www.facebook.com/mashalbookslahore #Overpopulation #Environment #Education #SocialIssues
Population Genetics: Genetic, Environmental & Societal Factors – Medical Genetics | Lecturio
 
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This video “Population Genetics: Genetic, Environmental & Societal Factors” is part of the Lecturio course “Medical Genetics” ► WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/populationgenetics ► LEARN ABOUT: - Genetic factors - Environmental factors - Societal factors - Gentopic and allelic frequencies ► THE PROF: Dr. Georgina Cornwall has taught a broad array of Biology courses at different U.S. universities, currently at the Colorado Mountain College in Aspen. Dr. Cornwall is an active promoter of hybrid teaching formats like online and interactive courses. Thus, she uses modern technology to engage her students in the diverse disciplines of biology – from Microbiology to Genetics. ► LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/populationgenetics ► INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak ► READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: Biology for Physicians: Formal Genetics and Population Genetics http://lectur.io/popgeneticsarticle ► SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe ► WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists ► LET’S CONNECT: • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.medical.education.videos • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_medical_videos • Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed
Living Things Change: Crash Course Kids #41.1
 
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Have you ever heard of the Peppered Moth? It's a great example of how living things can change because their environment has changed. And it's not just them! There used to be giant insects roaming the world, but they got smaller through time because their environments changed. In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina gives us some examples of how and why living things change because of their environments. Watch More Crash Course Kids: https://www.youtube.com/user/crashcoursekids ///Standards Used in This Video/// 5-LS2-1. Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the idea that matter that is not food (air, water, decomposed materials in soil) is changed by plants into matter that is food. Examples of systems could include organisms, ecosystems, and the Earth.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include molecular explanations.] Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Crash Course Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Credits... Producer & Editor: Nicholas Jenkins Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda Host: Sabrina Cruz Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern Writer: Jen Szymanski Executive Producers: John & Hank Green Consultant: Shelby Alinsky Script Editor: Blake de Pastino Thought Cafe Team: Stephanie Bailis Cody Brown Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathan Corbiere Nick Counter Kelsey Heinrichs Jack Kenedy Corey MacDonald Tyler Sammy Nikkie Stinchcombe James Tuer Adam Winnik
Views: 334339 Crash Course Kids
What If The World Went Vegetarian?
 
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What if everyone became a vegetarian right now? Becoming Vegetarian for 21 Days: https://youtu.be/9iQKLSw15WM Subscribe for more: http://bit.ly/asapsci Written by Tyler Irving, Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading / Sources: http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/feed_the_world/2014/05/meat_eating_and_climate_change_vegetarians_impact_on_the_economy_antibiotics.html http://www.nationalgeographic.com/foodfeatures/feeding-9-billion/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetarianism_by_country http://faostat3.fao.org/home/E http://www.fao.org/docrep/010/a0701e/a0701e00.HTM http://www.un.org/en/events/desertificationday/background.shtml http://www.fao.org/ag/againfo/resources/en/publications/tackling_climate_change/index.htm http://www3.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/global.html http://dels.nas.edu/resources/static-assets/banr/AnimalProductionMaterials/StehfestClimate.pdf http://www.unep.org/resourcepanel/Portals/24102/PDFs/PriorityProductsAndMaterials_Report.pdf http://waterfootprint.org/media/downloads/Report-48-WaterFootprint-AnimalProducts-Vol1.pdf http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1305827110 http://www.nature.com/news/humans-are-becoming-more-carnivorous-1.14282
Views: 6478134 AsapSCIENCE
Why you should submit your research to Applied and Environmental Microbiology
 
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Harold Drake, PhD, introduces ASM's journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology and provides tips for submitters. Submit your research articles for review at http://aem.asm.org/ Applied and Environmental Microbiology (AEM) publishes study results that make significant contributions to applied microbial research, basic microbial ecology research, and genetic and molecular investigations of microbial topics of practical value. The journal sheds new light on key microbiological principles, fundamental microbial processes, and basic questions in applied and environmental microbiology. Its original research articles not only build on our understanding of microbiology but also enable scientists to advance their own investigations, design new products, and develop new processes.
Stress (biology) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stress_(biology) 00:02:03 1 Overview 00:04:47 2 Psychology 00:07:30 3 Etymology and historical usage 00:09:19 4 Biological need for equilibrium 00:11:24 5 Biological background 00:12:57 6 Biology of stress 00:18:09 7 Effects of chronic stress 00:19:20 7.1 Immunological 00:20:35 7.2 Infectious 00:21:00 7.3 Chronic disease 00:22:10 7.4 Development 00:22:45 7.5 Psychopathology 00:24:13 8 Psychological concepts 00:24:23 8.1 Eustress 00:25:16 8.2 Coping 00:27:32 8.3 Cognitive appraisal 00:28:55 9 Assessment 00:29:04 9.1 Assessment 00:30:52 9.2 Health risk factors 00:32:30 9.3 General adaptation syndrome 00:33:22 9.3.1 Stage 1 00:34:40 9.3.2 Stage 2 00:35:37 9.3.3 Stage 3 00:37:03 10 History in research 00:41:51 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9398860045202149 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Physiological or biological stress is an organism's response to a stressor such as an environmental condition. Stress is the body's method of reacting to a condition such as a threat, challenge or physical and psychological barrier. Stimuli that alter an organism's environment are responded to by multiple systems in the body. The autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are two major systems that respond to stress.The sympathoadrenal medullary (SAM) axis may activate the fight-or-flight response through the sympathetic nervous system, which dedicates energy to more relevant bodily systems to acute adaptation to stress, while the parasympathetic nervous system returns the body to homeostasis. The second major physiological stress, the HPA axis regulates the release of cortisol, which influences many bodily functions such as metabolic, psychological and immunological functions. The SAM and HPA axes are regulated by several brain regions, including the limbic system, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, and stria terminalis.Through these mechanisms, stress can alter memory functions, reward, immune function, metabolism and susceptibility to diseases. Definitions of stress differ. One system suggests there are five types of stress labeled "acute time-limited stressors", "brief naturalistic stressors", "stressful event sequences", "chronic stressors", and "distant stressors". An acute time-limited stressor involves a short-term challenge, while a brief natural stressor involves an event that is normal but nevertheless challenging. A stressful event sequence is a stressor that occurs, and then continues to yield stress into the immediate future. A chronic stressor involves exposure to a long-term stressor, and a distant stressor is a stressor that is not immediate.
Views: 16 wikipedia tts
Mom vs. Dad: What Did You Inherit?
 
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Learn more about your DNA by going to: https://www.23andme.com/ASAP Subscribe for weekly videos: http://bit.ly/asapsci Created by: Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown Written by: Amanda Edward, Rachel Salt, Greg Brown & Mitch Moffit Illustrated by: Max Simmons Edited by: Sel Ghebrehiwot FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com SNAPCHAT US 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading/References: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167629616303666?via%3Dihub https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/babies-paternal-resemblance/ https://www.nature.com/articles/srep45885 https://www.23andme.com/en-ca/gen101/origins/ http://anthro.palomar.edu/biobasis/bio_4.htm https://www.alnmag.com/news/2013/08/dad%E2%80%99s-genes-build-placentas http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/08/dad-s-genes-build-placentas-study-shows https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3696791/ https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/classical-genetics/sex-linkage-non-nuclear-chromosomal-mutations/a/sex-linkage-sex-determination-and-x-inactivation http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/basics/observable/ http://www.genesinlife.org/genetics-101/how-does-genetics-work/main-inheritance-patterns https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5308812/ http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v40/n11/abs/ng.228.html http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v40/n11/abs/ng.255.html https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/classical-genetics/sex-linkage-non-nuclear-chromosomal-mutations/a/x-inactivation https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/turner-syndrome http://www.phschool.com/science/biology_place/labbench/lab3/crossovr.html https://www.nature.com/scitable/definition/principle-of-independent-assortment-law-of-independent-302 http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2015/03/03/genetically-more-like-dad/#.WVejxITythE http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v47/n4/full/ng.3222.html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150302123253.htm https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/like-mother-like-daughter-the-science-says-so-too/ http://centaur.reading.ac.uk/49005/ http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/do-you-share-more-genes-your-mother-or-your-father/ http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167488913001092 http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(12)01106-3?_returnURL=http%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0092867412011063%3Fshowall%3Dtrue http://www.mitocanada.org/about-mitochondrial-disease/how-is-mitochondrial-disease-inherited-2/ http://www.mitoaction.org/mito-faq https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9b7w2wJu7Eo https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/prader-willi-syndrome http://www.fpwr.ca/about-prader-willi-syndrome/ https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/angelman-syndrome Mom vs Dad Genetic Traits inherited Characteristics Y Chromosome X Chromosome Mitochondrial DNA Maternal Linked Disease Why Am I going Bald Male Colour Blindness Do babies look more like their fathers is intelligence inherited is depression inherited is depression genetic genetic facial features how DNA is inherited how ancestry works
Views: 1470069 AsapSCIENCE
Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided?
 
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"For the first time an array of interconnected problems is moving a global civilization toward collapse. Driven by increasing overpopulation and over consumption by the rich, these dilemmas include climate disruption, loss of ecosystem services, global poisoning, depletion of resources (especially soils and groundwater), and the threat of vast famines, epidemics and resource wars. Only a concerted effort to reduce the scale of society and focus much more attention on agriculture and equity seems likely to much improve the human prospect. Growth is the disease; sustainability is attainable, but only with unprecedented rethinking, effort, and cooperation." This seminar consists of a short presentation given by Professor Paul Ehrlich based on his recent paper Can a collapse of global civilization be avoided? and will be followed by an extended interactive Q&A session with the audience. Dr. Paul R. Ehrlich is the Bing Professor of Population Studies, and President, Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford University. His research interests are in the ecology and evolution of natural populations of butterflies, reef fishes, birds and human beings. Anne Ehrlich is a Senior Research Scientist in Biology at Stanford and focuses her research on policy issues related to the environment. She has carried out research and coauthored many technical articles in population biology. She also has written extensively on issues of public concern such as population control, environmental protection, and environmental consequences of nuclear war and is coauthor of ten books. http://www.mq.edu.au/
Views: 33626 Macquarie University
Introduction to Environmental Science | EVS | Letstute
 
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In this online video lecture on Introduction to Environmental Science we will learn about Environmental Science /EVS In this session we will learn about: 1) Environment 2) Components of Environment 3) Environmental Science 4) Lithosphere,Hydrosphere and Atmosphere. 5) Natural Resources 6) Environmental Degradation I hope you will enjoy this session on Introduction to Environmental Science - EVS on Let's tute You may Avail EVS course on Hydrosphere | Natural Resource - Water which includes Vdeo Lectures, Assessments and Quiz Videos from https://goo.gl/Jyo6AX Avail DVD on Hydrosphere | Natural Resource- Water from https://goo.gl/TJmkF6 Buy EVS course on Waste Managemnet which includes Video Lectures, Asssessments and Quiz Videos by clicking the link below https://goo.gl/uW4wJB Avail DVD on the same course of Waste Management from https://goo.gl/e2RtUQ To Get Regular Content Updates- Subscribe Us For More Updates: Link : https://goo.gl/bfusQt Website : http://letstute.com/ To Get Regular Content Updates- Like Us On Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/letstutepage Follow Us On Twitter : https://twitter.com/letstute Add Us On Google+ for updates on our upcoming Videos https://plus.google.com/+Letstute Email us @ [email protected] WhatsApp your Queries on +91 7506363600 Visit our other channels LetsTute Cbse Math https://goo.gl/Q5xVCN LetsTute Accountancy http://bit.ly/1VvIMWD Values to Lead (Value Education) http://bit.ly/1poLX8j
Views: 322172 Letstute
Sociology's engagement with the environment (Part I)
 
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In this lecture, Dr. Riley Dunlap presents the history and early development of the environmental sociology. He defines environmental sociology as the broad study of society-environment interactions, and notes that historically that study was focused on modern industrialized societies. He highlights the early focus of environmental sociology on the social construction of environmental problems, and notes that in the 1970s there were several theoretical schools of thought about human relate to the natural environment. He contrasts the dominant western worldview with the human exemptionalist and new ecological paradigms, and links these paradigms to underlying sociological theories about human motivation and decision-making. He concludes by noting that environmental sociology is both expanding and being complemented by related frameworks that highlight the interdisciplinary nature of human-environment interactions.
Views: 2564 sesync annapolis
Enzyme reaction velocity and pH | Cellular energetics | AP Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Exploring the relationship between pH and enzyme activity. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/science/ap-biology/cellular-energetics/environmental-impacts-on-enzyme-function/v/enzyme-reaction-velocity-and-ph Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 2214 Khan Academy
What is Ozone Layer? - Environmental Science for Kids | Educational Videos by Mocomi
 
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https://mocomi.com/ presents: What is Ozone Layer? What is ozone layer and how it is getting depleted? Life on earth is protected from the UV rays by a layer in the upper atmosphere (known as the stratosphere), which surrounds earth. This layer is called the Ozone layer. Ozone is a gas made up of three oxygen atoms (O3) much like the layer of butter that settles on top if a glass of buttermilk is left unattended for a while. This layer is just about 3-5mm thick. This thinly spread-out gas has been protecting life near the earth’s surface from the sun’s harmful UV rays for billions of years. Ozone is spread thinly throughout the stratosphere in low quantities. Watch this animated video to understand Why is the ozone layer in danger? and What is the ozone hole? To learn more about the ozone layer, go to https://mocomi.com/what-is-the-ozone-layer/ For more such educational videos and interactive articles related to environment, visit: https://mocomi.com/learn/environment/ Follow Mocomi Kids - Top educational website for kids, on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/mocomikids/ on Twitter https://twitter.com/MocomiKids on Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/mocomikids/ on Google+ https://plus.google.com/+mocomikids/ on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/mocomi-kids
Views: 471662 MocomiKids
Environment & Ecology MCQ's in Hindi (Test -18) [UPSC,UPPSC,BPSC,MPPSC,SSC,KVS,CTET,TET,TGT,PGT]
 
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Environment & Ecology MCQ's in Hindi for various government exams. Chapter 4 (जैव विविधता सरंक्षण) (Part - D)
Views: 458 Study with Mayank
Phenotype plasticity | Heredity | AP Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Understanding how the same genotype can still result in variation of phenotype based on environment. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/science/ap-biology/heredity/environmental-effects-on-phenotype/v/phenotype-plasticity Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 6656 Khan Academy
7 Discoveries Scientists Made by Licking Things
 
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You probably know not to lick something unfamiliar. But there are actually a surprising number of discoveries that have been made because scientists licked things. Hosted by: Hank Green SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at https://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters: Alex Schuerch, Alex Hackman, Andrew Finley Brenan, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: https://www.businessinsider.com/viagra-lsd-pacemakers-accidental-scientific-discoveries-2018-4#sweetn-low-6 https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/10/what-happens-when-chemists-dont-wash-their-hands/381587/ https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/chemistrynow/chem_sweeteners.jsp https://www.acsh.org/news/2004/10/08/a-bittersweet-anniversary-35-years-ago-this-month-cyclamate-was-banned https://books.google.com/books?id=yTH1iI9ybl4C&pg=PA4&lpg=PA4&dq=%22at+a+slightly+later+stage,+when+licking+my+finger+to+pick+up+a+piece+of+paper,+I+noticed+a+very+strong,+sweet,+taste%22&source=bl&ots=SjKqBGx79u&sig=2T2ZO0JpRU6ec6IIC-i7lOkfMls&hl=en&sa=X&ei=2UJAVKaNF6f28QHuuoGwDg#v=onepage&q=%22at%20a%20slightly%20later%20stage%2C%20when%20licking%20my%20finger%20to%20pick%20up%20a%20piece%20of%20paper%2C%20I%20noticed%20a%20very%20strong%2C%20sweet%2C%20taste%22&f=false http://www.publish.csiro.au/sb/pdf/SB17011 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF01666505 https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2017/12/08/568926178/scientists-discover-grass-species-with-intriguing-salt-and-vinegar-chip-flavor https://www.nationalgeographic.com.au/australia/aussie-grass-tastes-like-salt-and-vinegar.aspx https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/15/scientists-discover-grass-tastes-like-salt-vinegar-crisps/ https://www.sciencealert.com/salt-and-vinegar-chip-taste-spinifex-australian-native-grass-weird-plants https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/handle/10088/4037/Dumbacher1992.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y http://www.pnas.org/content/pnas/101/45/15857.full.pdf https://www.nytimes.com/1992/10/30/us/rare-bird-indeed-carries-poison-in-bright-feathers.html https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/avaqxa/these-birds-from-papua-new-guinea-secrete-one-of-the-worlds-most-deadly-poisons https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/blogs/creatura-blog/2014/06/hooded-pitohui-bird/ https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/nab/v046n05/p01084-p01087.pdf http://mentalfloss.com/article/51743/4-poisonous-birds http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/motm/batrachotoxin/batrah.htm https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264422709_CARL_WILHELM_SCHEELE_1742-1786_THE_LIFE_OF_A_GREAT_CHEMIST https://chemistry.unt.edu/sites/default/files/users/owj0001/scheele.pdf https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25281638 https://www.britannica.com/biography/Carl-Wilhelm-Scheele http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Carl_Wilhelm_Scheele https://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/emergency/chemical_terrorism/cyanide_general.htm https://allthatsinteresting.com/carl-wilhelm-scheele http://listverse.com/2008/06/04/top-10-scientists-killed-or-injured-by-their-experiments/ https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22329762-600-ancient-water-cache-may-be-pristine-primordial-soup/ https://www.cnn.com/2013/06/21/world/americas/ancient-water-tasting/index.html https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12127.epdf?referrer_access_token=3dITCYYZoDCID_rdak1xx9RgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0N1aiQbudzlXgR9YQ8YwjwgPvDaT_vLsREYFVAUXBvgmJ3QhMtF7Sj2tCKzH-SM0eGe2wp3fwolap8LiuPqoHIbDXp4UXbJ8dlUvbAF2T3BJPr_2xb0yLGAympUducrLKXJiQ_VQzXxC8vnwesEF-jbRbWwoKJyBbMpP_5-EVpfi2vFjZeG2TcmuHV_7lUFSlNdh8G3FFMxXBLFMDtubxgb&tracking_referrer=www.cnn.com https://www.livescience.com/32028-oldest-water-found-underground.html https://curiosity.com/topics/one-way-to-tell-between-a-rock-and-a-fossil-is-to-lick-it-curiosity/ https://twitter.com/mikamckinnon/status/1030860663667740673?lang=en https://voices.pomona.edu/2013/11/on-the-merits-of-licking-rocks/ https://www.cnn.com/2013/06/21/world/americas/ancient-water-tasting/index.html https://www.nature.com/articles/nature12127.epdf?referrer_access_token=3dITCYYZoDCID_rdak1xx9RgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0N1aiQbudzlXgR9YQ8YwjwgPvDaT_vLsREYFVAUXBvgmJ3QhMtF7Sj2tCKzH-SM0eGe2wp3fwolap8LiuPqoHIbDXp4UXbJ8dlUvbAF2T3BJPr_2xb0yLGAympUducrLKXJiQ_VQzXxC8vnwesEF-jbRbWwoKJyBbMpP_5-EVpfi2vFjZeG2TcmuHV_7lUFSlNdh8G3FFMxXBLFMDtubxgb&tracking_referrer=www.cnn.com http://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/main/itn/barbara-sherwood-lollar-taste-ancient-water
Views: 480324 SciShow
TEDxAddis - Negusu Aklilu - Is A Green Ethiopia Possible?
 
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Negusu Aklilu is Director of the Forum for Environment in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He has been working as an environmental campaigner for the last 15 years and has played a leading role in advocating for environmental rights in Ethiopia and beyond. He led some successful campaigns at home and two campaigns in the run-up to the Copenhagen Climate Conference in 2010. One is the African Climate Appeal, a politico-moral appeal by key African environmental activists initiated by Nobel Laureate Wangari Maathai. The other campaign, ³America, Take the Lead Now², produced a petition signed by about 2 million Ethiopians to the US government. Currently, Negusu co-chairs the Ethiopian Civil Society Network on ClimateChange (ECSNCC), comprising about 60 organizations. He is a representative of civil society organizations in Ethiopia¹s National Environment Council. He has authored a number of articles on a range of environmental issues and serves as editor of Akirma, a local environmental magazine, as well as co-editor of the Ethiopian Environment Review. Some of his other initiatives in Ethiopia include the national Green Award Program, the annual Ethiopian Environment Review, and the new local Green Tax initiative. Currently, he serves as a co-chair of the UNEP Major Groups and StakeholdersAdvisory Group on International Environmental Governance, which has been providing inputs for the Rio+20 process. He was voted one of the 25 most influential Ethiopians in 2009/2010 by Addis Neger, Ethiopian newspaper. In the same year, he was voted as one of the 13 emerging global environmental leaders by the Global Environmental Governance Program that was then hosted by the College of William and Mary and Yale University. He is trained in biology and ecology and later in Environmental Diplomacy ata UNEP/University of Geneva post-graduate course. Negusu was named Yale World Fellow in June 2011.
Views: 7162 TEDx Talks
Native Plants Summit: Current Status, Conservation, and Outlook for Plants of the Northeast
 
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The northeastern U.S. hosts a rich diversity of native plants, many of which play essential roles for humans and the environment. Alarmingly, a significant number of these species are experiencing a precipitous decline. Many are imperiled as a result, including one-quarter of species native to New York State. Despite these figures, no comprehensive or integrated program exists to study trends across the region. Through a series of compelling presentations, followed by a panel discussion, this Summit will address the gaps in our knowledge by bringing together experts to present and discuss the state of the area’s plant species, plot the best course forward, and highlight ways in which everyone can make a difference for native plants in the Northeast. 06:25 – Robert Naczi 38:44 – Bernd Blossey 1:04:48– Rebecca Dolan 1:27:57 – Jerry Jenkins 1:51:48 – David Werier 2:13:31 – Donald Leopold 2:36:11 – Mary Klein 3:01:12 – Q&A Panel Discussion SPEAKER BIOS Robert Naczi, Ph.D., is a plant systematist whose research focuses on the flora of the eastern United States, the sedges (Cyperaceae), and the Western Hemisphere Pitcher Plants (Sarraceniaceae). Naczi uses a multipronged approach in his research, employing field, herbarium, and laboratory methods. His fieldwork has given him first- hand knowledge of the flora of much of North America. Bernd Blossey, Ph.D., was born and raised in northern Germany. In 1992 he joined the faculty of Cornell University, where he is currently an Associate Professor directing the Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants Program in the Department of Natural Resources. Rebecca W. Dolan earned an undergraduate degree from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from the University of Georgia, both in botany. For 25 years she has been Director of the Friesner Herbarium at Butler University. She is now busy building an online atlas of Indiana plants and is the author of over 25 scientific articles on restoration ecology, urban botany, and genetics of rare plants. Jerry Jenkins is a botanist and ecologist from White Creek, New York. He was trained in physics and philosophy, and has 46 years of field experience with northern floras. He works as a scientist for the Wildlife Conservation Society, is the founder and director of the White Creek Field School, and is the director of the Northern Forest Atlas Project. David Werier is a botanist who has his own consulting business based out of the Ithaca, New York area. His botanical interests focus on understanding the vascular plants of eastern North America (primarily New York State) through fieldwork in conjunction with herbarium and literature research. Donald J. Leopold earned his Ph.D. in forest ecology from Purdue University in 1984, his M.S.F. in forest ecology from the University of Kentucky in 1981, and B.S. in ornamental horticulture/nursery management from the University of Kentucky in 1978. He is a Distinguished Teaching Professor and Chair in the Department of Environmental and Forest Biology at SUNY-ESF. He has published over 60 journal papers, six books, and many additional publications, all generally about topics in forest and wetland ecology and native plants. Mary Klein, President and CEO of NatureServe, has been an active proponent for the conservation of species and ecosystems for nearly 30 years. She leads an international network of more than 1,000 conservation professionals who provide the scientific basis for effective conservation action—responding to more than six million information inquiries each year. In this role, she guides the identification, mapping, and analysis of species and ecosystems.
Microorganisms in wastewater treatment
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html There are numerous processes that can be used to clean up wastewaters depending on the type and extent of contamination. There are two basic approaches: to use the waste in the water as a resource (such as constructed wetlands) or strictly as a pollution (such as the majority of today's treatment plants). Most wastewater is treated in industrial-scale energy intensive wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which include physical, chemical and biological treatment processes. However, the use of septic tanks and other On-Site Sewage Facilities (OSSF) is widespread in rural areas, serving up to 20 percent of the homes in the U.S.[2] The most important aerobic treatment system is the activated sludge process, based on the maintenance and recirculation of a complex biomass composed by micro-organisms able to absorb and adsorb the organic matter carried in the wastewater. Anaerobic wastewater treatment processes (UASB, EGSB) are also widely applied in the treatment of industrial wastewaters and biological sludge. Some wastewater may be highly treated and reused as reclaimed water. Increasingly, for most wastewaters ecological approaches using reed bed systems such as constructed wetlands are being used. Tertiary treatment is being increasingly applied and most common technologies are micro filtration or synthetic membranes. After membrane filtration, the treated wastewater is indistinguishable from waters of natural origin of drinking quality (without its minerals). Nitrates can be removed from wastewater by natural processes in wetlands but also via intensive microbial denitrification, for which a small amount of methanol is typically added to provide the bacteria with a source of carbon. Ozone wastewater treatment is also growing in popularity, and requires the use of an ozone generator, which decontaminates the water as ozone bubbles percolate through the tank but is energy intensive. Disposal of wastewaters from an industrial plant is a difficult and costly problem. Most petroleum refineries, chemical and petrochemical plants[3][4] have onsite facilities to treat their wastewaters so that the pollutant concentrations in the treated wastewater comply with the local and/or national regulations regarding disposal of wastewaters into community treatment plants or into rivers, lakes or oceans. Constructed wetlands are being used in an increasing number of cases as they provided high quality and productive on-site treatment. Other industrial processes that produce a lot of waste-waters such as paper and pulp production has created environmental concern, leading to development of processes to recycle water use within plants before they have to be cleaned and disposed.[5] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. © by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 27192 Shomu's Biology
Is Homosexuality in Your Genes?
 
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Scientists have identified two new genetic connections to homosexuality. Does this confirm that there are predisposed sexual orientations? We Got Our DNA Tested, Here's How It Actually Works - https://youtu.be/dbiv6BAmdF4 Read More: What do the new ‘gay genes’ tell us about sexual orientation? https://www.newscientist.com/article/2155810-what-do-the-new-gay-genes-tell-us-about-sexual-orientation/ “Two gene variants have been found to be more common in gay men, adding to mounting evidence that sexual orientation is at least partly biologically determined. For the first time, individual genes have been identified that may influence how sexual orientation develops in boys and men, both in the womb and during life.” Where Is It Illegal To Be Gay? https://www.seeker.com/where-is-it-illegal-to-be-gay-1915471441.html “There are many places in the world where it's illegal to be gay. In fact, according to the U.N., homosexuality is a crime in at least 75 countries, 13 of which impose the death penalty for homosexual acts. Anti-gay laws are most pervasive in Africa and the Middle East.” Study of gay brothers may confirm X chromosome link to homosexuality http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/11/study-gay-brothers-may-confirm-x-chromosome-link-homosexuality “Dean Hamer finally feels vindicated. More than 20 years ago, in a study that triggered both scientific and cultural controversy, the molecular biologist offered the first direct evidence of a “gay gene,” by identifying a stretch on the X chromosome likely associated with homosexuality. But several subsequent studies called his finding into question.” ____________________ Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Special Thanks to Julian Huguet for hosting and writing this episode of Seeker! Check Julian out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00?lang=en
Views: 204545 Seeker
The Science of HIV/AIDS
 
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What is it, and are we close to a cure? SHARE on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1NalHm8 & Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1MTLpMp Get a FREE Audible Trial: http://audible.com/asap Written by Rachel Salt, Mitchell Moffit and Gregory Brown SUBSCRIBE for more (it's free!): http://bit.ly/asapsci GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Further Reading: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/global-statistics/ The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic HIV Transmission http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/transmission.html http://lcbb4.epfl.ch/reading/HIV/2013-PeetersOriginEpidemiologyHIV.pdf The origin and molecular epidemiology of HIV https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2441482/ Env length and N-linked glycosylation following transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 subtype B viruses http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pavel_Pugach/publication/8679190_The_CCR5_and_CXCR4_coreceptors--central_to_understanding_the_transmission_and_pathogenesis_of_human_immunodeficiency_virus_type_1_infection/links/0fcfd51200b440c2fe000000.pdf The CCR5 and CXCR4 coreceptors-central to understanding the transmission and pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 20, 111-126 http://dspace.uah.es/dspace/bitstream/handle/10017/5071/840.pdf?sequence=1 Dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase: A single mode of inhibition for the three HIV enzymes? http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1742-4690-6-40.pdf A historical reflection on the discovery of human retroviruses http://www.ms.uky.edu/~ma137/Fasttrack13/HIV_Perelson_Science1996.pdf HIV-1 Dynamics in Vivo: Virion Clearance Rate, Infected Cell Life-Span, and Viral Generation Time Precise determination of time to reach viral load set point after acute HIV-1 infection. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23143525 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v362/n6418/abs/362355a0.html HIV infection is active and progressive in lymphoid tissue during the clinically latent stage of disease http://www.joponline.org/doi/abs/10.1902/jop.1994.65.5.393 Necrotizing Ulcerative Periodontitis: A Marker for Immune Deterioration and a Predictor for the Diagnosis of AIDS https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/just-diagnosed-with-hiv-aids/hiv-in-your-body/stages-of-hiv/ Stages of HIV Infection http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/livingwithhiv/opportunisticinfections.html Opportunistic Infections https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/drugs/445/pyrimethamine/0/patient AIDSinfo Drug Database http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html PrEP http://www.who.int/hiv/topics/mtct/q2_chi_2007.pdf Single-dose tenofovir and emtricitabine for reduction of viral resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs in women given intrapartum nevirapine for perinatal HIV prevention: an open-label randomised trial http://dspace.uah.es/dspace/bitstream/handle/10017/5071/840.pdf?sequence=1 Dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase: A single mode of inhibition for the three HIV enzymes? http://lcbb4.epfl.ch/reading/HIV/2013-PeetersOriginEpidemiologyHIV.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3234451/ http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0802905 Long-Term Control of HIV by CCR5 Delta32/Delta32 Stem-Cell Transplantation
Views: 1815522 AsapSCIENCE
Rose McDermott: The Genetics of Politics | Talks at Google
 
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"While traditionally social factors have been considered to have primary influence on political behaviors and preferences, more recent research shows that there's also a strong heritable component to ideological attitudes. Rose McDermott, professor of International Relations at Brown University and a 2015-16 CASBS fellow, will discuss her research on the influence of genetic contributions to political and social behavior. McDermott has described her work as intended to offer “…a genuinely interdisciplinary approach to the interaction of psychological processes and political outcomes."" McDermott studies the biological influences which interact with environmental factors to shape ideology across the political spectrum in cultures around the world. Her research has included conducting embedded experiments on attitudes toward gender equality in numerous countries including Lebanon, Jordan, Uganda, Indonesia, Mongolia and India. The author of Political Psychology in International Relations and co-editor of Man Is by Nature a Political Animal , McDermott was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 02013. McDermott is the David and Mariana Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University and a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She received her Ph.D.(Political Science) and M.A. (Experimental Social Psychology) from Stanford University and has taught at Cornell, UCSB and Harvard. She has held numerous fellowships, including the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies and the Women and Public Policy Program, all at Harvard University. She is also a past and current fellow at the Stanford Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. She is the author of three books, a co-editor of two additional volumes, and author of over a hundred academic articles across a wide variety of disciplines encompassing topics such as experimentation, emotion and decision making, and the biological and genetic bases of political behavior." Get the book here: https://goo.gl/olXF6x
Views: 2910 Talks at Google
Water Pollution for Kids | #aumsum
 
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Our topic for today is Water Pollution. Contamination of water by harmful substances, which affects life on earth, is termed as water pollution. Due to human activities, our water is getting more and more polluted day by day. Household garbage is disposed into various sources of water. Many people perform their domestic activities like bathing, washing clothes and utensils, etc. in these sources of water. Also, industrial wastes are discharged into the water, leading to water pollution. Consumption of this polluted water leads to diseases like cholera, typhoid, diarrhoea, etc. in human beings. Polluted water also adversely affects the aquatic life. Thus, we need to make sure that we do not pollute water. Domestic activities such as bathing, washing clothes and utensils should not be done in rivers, lakes, ponds, etc. Household garbage should not be disposed in the various sources of water. Also, sewage and industrial waste water should be treated before discharging into the water.
Views: 1763293 It's AumSum Time
Top 10 Fields Other Than MBBS and BDS (With Scope in Pakistan)
 
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Are you finding fields other than MBBS and BDS along with scope and which institutions of Pakistan offer? Then you should never miss this video. Read This Detailed Articles with Institution name and much more ---------------------------------------------- http://www.topstudyworld.com/2016/09/top-10-fields-other-than-MBBS-and-BDS.html
Views: 96311 Top Study World
What Was The Miller-Urey Experiment?
 
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Click this link to take a survey about this video: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/X2D8D7R This animation was sponsored by the Center for Chemical Evolution, NSF, and NASA: http://centerforchemicalevolution.com/ Help support Stated Clearly on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/statedclearly The Miller-Urey experiment was the first attempt to scientifically explore ideas about the origin of life. Stanley Miller simulated conditions thought be common on the ancient Earth. The purpose was to test the idea that the complex molecules of life (in this case, amino acids) could have arisen on our young planet through simple, natural chemical reactions. The experiment was a success in that amino acids, the building blocks of life, were produced during the simulation. The finding was so significant that it kick started an entirely new field of study: Prebiotic Chemistry. Scientists now have reason to believe that the gases used in the Miller-Urey simulation were not actually the same as those of the ancient atmosphere. Because of this, many experiments have since been done, testing a wide variety of atmospheres and different environmental conditions. The results are overwhelming: the molecules of life can form under a wide variety of ancient Earth-like conditions. Many questions about the origin of life remain to be answered but these findings give strong support to the idea that the first living cells on Earth may have emerged from natural chemical reactions. Sources: The Miller-Urey Experiment (actual paper from 1953): http://abenteuer-universum.de/pdf/miller_1953.pdf Biomolecules found in meteorites: Sugar! https://www.nature.com/articles/414857a http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/life-components.html http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/dna-meteorites.html http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20120001640.pdf Biomolecules form in asteroid simulations: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20358044 Biomolecules form in Volcanic Simulations: http://astrobiology.gsfc.nasa.gov/analytical/PDF/Johnsonetal2008.pdf Biomolecules (amino acids) form in non-reducing atmosphere simulations: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11084-007-9120-3 Sealed chemical vials from some origional Miller experiments were recently re-examined with modern tools. All kinds of great things were found! http://www.livescience.com/13339-primordial-soup-chemistry-reaction-amino-acids-life.html
Views: 472524 Stated Clearly
Choosing which statistical test to use - statistics help.
 
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Seven different statistical tests and a process by which you can decide which to use. The tests are: Test for a mean, test for a proportion, difference of proportions, difference of two means - independent samples, difference of two means - paired, chi-squared test for independence and regression. This video draws together videos about Helen, her brother, Luke and the choconutties. There is a sequel to give more practice choosing and illustrations of the different types of test with hypotheses.
Views: 786778 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
Advancing Metagenomic Tools for Monitoring Antibiotic Resistance and Pathogen Gene Markers in..
 
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Presented At: Microbiology & Immunology 2018 Presented By: Amy Pruden, PhD - Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Associate Dean and Director of Interdisciplinary Graduate Education, Virginia Tech Speaker Biography: Amy Pruden is the W. Thomas Rice Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on bringing a microbial ecological perspective to understanding and advancing design and management of environmental systems. Pruden is a leading expert on water-based pathogens and antibiotic resistance. In 2012-2013, she led a Water Research Foundation expert workshop and report on Opportunistic Pathogens in Premise Plumbing: Epidemiology, Microbial Ecology, and Engineering Controls, in which a multi-stakeholder framework for public health protection was developed. In 2016, she co-organized a workshop sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation at Emory University, From Watersheds to Showerheads: Improving Legionella Risk Management in the 21st Century. Her current research, funded by The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, focuses on how engineering design shapes the composition of the microbiome of tap water and implications for control and spread of Legionella, Naegleria fowleri, and antibiotic resistance genes. She has authored over 120 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles and is currently PI on a USDA AFRI project aimed at developing computational tools for identifying critical control points for mitigating the spread of antibiotic resistance. Dr. Pruden is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering and the Paul L. Busch Award for innovation in water research. She holds a B.S. in biology and a Ph.D. in environmental science, both from the University of Cincinnati. Webinar: Advancing Metagenomic Tools for Monitoring Antibiotic Resistance and Pathogen Gene Markers in Water and the Environment Webinar Abstract: Next-generation DNA sequencing has opened new possibilities for microbial water quality monitoring, particularly for addressing emerging concerns like antibiotic resistance and opportunistic pathogens. Here we will demonstrate how the approach is being applied to survey antibiotic resistance genes and pathogen gene markers in various water and environmental systems, including drinking water, wastewater, reclaimed water, and agricultural manure management systems. Current efforts are focused on deriving various metrics from metagenomic data for assessing presence of these targets and potential to spread undesirable traits, such as antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. As DNA sequencing and bioinformatic technologies are rapidly developing, development and validation of various approaches is needed, along with adoption of standardized methods by relevant stakeholders. Learning Objectives: 1. Describe what shotgun metagenomic sequencing is and benefits for water analysis 2. Describe current limitations to shotgun metagenomic approaches for pathogen and resistance monitoring 3. Describe new developments and approaches for advancing metagenomic tools for water monitoring Earn PACE/CME Credits: 1. Make sure you’re a registered member of LabRoots (https://www.labroots.com/virtual-event/microbiology-immunology-2018) 2. Watch the webinar on YouTube above or on the LabRoots Website (https://www.labroots.com/virtual-event/microbiology-immunology-2018) 3. Click Here to get your PACE (Expiration date – September 12, 2020 06:00 AM)– https://www.labroots.com/credit/pace-credits/3016/third-party LabRoots on Social: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LabRootsInc Twitter: https://twitter.com/LabRoots LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/labroots Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/labrootsinc Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/labroots/ SnapChat: labroots_inc
Views: 231 LabRoots
ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANU_College_of_Medicine,_Biology_and_Environment 00:00:56 1 History 00:02:08 2 Academic courses 00:02:45 3 Research 00:03:18 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7122953576529534 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment is an Australian university college for the study of medicine, biology, and environment at the Australian National University (ANU), located in Canberra, the capital city of Australia. The College includes both undergraduate teaching departments and several research schools, with a focus upon different areas of the medical and health sciences and the impact of the environment. Together with the ANU College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, the College is part of the Science, Environment, Medicine & Health faculty and includes the ANU Research School of Biology, the ANU Medical School and the John Curtin School of Medical Research, the Fenner School of Environment and Society, the Research School of Population Health, and the Research School of Psychology.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
|| Environment lecture || tiger conservation || for mpsc upsc sti psi asst exams ||
 
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tiger conservation important lecture from environment Watch Mpsc lectures Online: https://www..com/channel/UCjhTfq5TACq6pu2Dl2aYTGw In these videos, we are going to reveal to you exactly, step-by-step how we can Crack Mpsc and many Competitive exams. This video will provide very useful information and it will help in all competitive examinations such as Upsc Mpsc STI PSI ASSISTANT as well as Bank exams also.. so please watch this lecture it will definitely help you to Crack Mpsc as well as Upsc... ★☆★ VIEW THE OTHER POST: ★☆★ https://www..com/channel/UCjhTfq5TACq6pu2Dl2aYTGw ★☆★ SUBSCRIBE TO US ON : ★☆★ https://www..com/channel/UCjhTfq5TACq6pu2Dl2aYTGw/featured ★☆★ FOLLOW VISION GOVERNMENT JOB BELOW: ★☆★ Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1886957188200638/ Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/visiongovernmentjobvGj/ ★☆★ OUR OTHER VIDEOS & PLAYLISTS: ★☆★ Vision MPSC in Marathi Mpsc lectures in marathi https://www..com/watch?v=xq0e1NMVNvI&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iFJ8nfq5BhMPD7j2iLY21E3 Vision MPSC https://www..com/watch?v=nbR5cdre7oY&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iH4TKSnh2wtp4l6ku8v_cvv vision history https://www..com/watch?v=WlIqFO4BKkc&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iE0IfEWwN8vQwriTOle0rYU Vision Economics in Marathi : Economics lectures in Marathi https://www..com/playlist?list=PLkrDYQ59e_iHQqSJ08t_p2kqalqtmEXOz Vision Polity in Marathi : Polity lectures in Marathi https://www..com/watch?v=91nM3rwwZiY&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iGPthv1zDco1KDu5rcDoC3b VISION G K SERIES https://www..com/watch?v=ZRThYxPIsAA&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iEnB3Ni03sua8Fs54BZq7do Vision Current Affairs in Marathi: Current Affairs in Marathi https://www..com/playlist?list=PLkrDYQ59e_iEUri5Vsm4aTvBYIz2ohH5a Vision Geography in Marathi: https://www..com/watch?v=FPaIfsCycRU&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iGP0pqU9WEJ41-UvoCBIT7v Vision Science https://www..com/watch?v=mtQymYAVE38&list=PLkrDYQ59e_iHnyF7HDeefyKv2h4Qg4tyc We started our channel, Vision Government Job , on 10 October of 2016. ★☆★ RECOMMENDED RESOURCES: ★☆★ https://www..com/channel/UCjhTfq5TACq6pu2Dl2aYTGw
Views: 15601 VISION GOVERNMENT JOB
#139 Peter Richerson: Biology and Culture, Cultural Evolution, Cognition, and Group Selection
 
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------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter ------------------Follow me on--------------------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedissenteryt/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDissenterYT SORRY ABOUT THE AUDIO AND VIDEO ISSUES, THE INTERNET CONNECTION WAS WEAK. HOPE YOU ENJOY IT. Dr. Peter Richerson is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at the University of California, Davis. He’s a biologist with interest in cultural evolution, animal social learning and mathematical models. He’s also the author of books like Culture and the Evolutionary Process, Not by Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution, and The Origin and Evolution of Cultures, all written in collaboration with Dr. Robert Boyd. In this episode, we talk about culture, cultural evolution, and gene-culture coevolution. We start off with a definition of culture and the relationship between biology and culture. Then, we talk about culture as a phenotype, how culture evolved, and the cognitive bases of it. We go through some of the main scientific approaches to culture and their drawbacks, including Leda Cosmides and John Tooby’s evoked culture, the sociobiologists and inclusive fitness, and Richard Dawkins’ memetics. We also refer to gene-culture coevolution, and how group selection work are the cultural and genetic levels. Time Links: 00:53 The relationship between Biology and Culture 02:57 What is culture? 04:41 Are there units of selection in culture, like ideas, beliefs, and norms? 07:32 Is there culture in other species? 08:56 Is culture part of the phenotype? And unique aspects of human culture 10:50 The cognitive bases of culture 15:45 How learning and culture evolved 19:28 Why is culture so rare in other animals? 22:58 Culture as environment 27:13 Cosmides and Tooby approach to culture (evoked culture) 30:49 When culture is maladaptive 33:09 About memetics, and the “meme” concept 36:31 Cultural group selection 42:48 Does group selection also occur at the genetic level? 48:14 Are there any purely biological or purely cultural aspects of human nature? 51:47 Follow Dr. Richerson’s work! -- Follow Dr. Richerson’s work: Faculty page: https://tinyurl.com/ya8h54z3 Articles on Researchgate: https://tinyurl.com/y7zgx29d Books: https://tinyurl.com/y8236hn6 -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, JUNOS, SCIMED, PER HELGE HAAKSTD LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, RUI BELEZA, MIGUEL ESTRADA, ANTÓNIO CUNHA, CHANTEL GELINAS, JIM FRANK, JERRY MULLER, FRANCIS FORD, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BRIAN RIVERA AND ADRIANO ANDRADE! I also leave you with the link to a recent montage video I did with the interviews I have released until the end of June 2018: https://youtu.be/efdb18WdZUo And check out my playlists on: PSYCHOLOGY: https://tinyurl.com/ybalf8km PHILOSOPHY: https://tinyurl.com/yb6a7d3p ANTHROPOLOGY: https://tinyurl.com/y8b42r7g #TheDissenter #PeterRicherson #Biology #Culture
Views: 277 The Dissenter
UP TET || 2018 || Environmental Studies || Kishor Gupta 🔥
 
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UP TET 2018 Environmental Studies By Kishor Gupta 🔥 paryavaran शिक्षक भर्ती परीक्षा Ctet Tet paryavaran se sambandhit prashna Paryavaran ke questions pryawaran paryavaran se related questions environment #KishorGupta
Views: 2054 Kishor Gupta
Major Biodiversity Crisis & A New Tyrannosaur - 7 Days of Science
 
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Did you know that 7 Days of Science is the best weekly series on YouTube? Make sure you know this. Or I will. Join our Discord server: https://discord.gg/3KgpG8J Subscribe to our subreddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/BenGThomas Music by Matt D Holloway: https://goo.gl/9wX4ht Subscribe to explore the wonderful life around you! Social Media: ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/BenGThomas42 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bengthomas42/ ►Instagram: http://bit.ly/1PIEagv ►Google+: http://bit.ly/1ObHejE Sources: 1 million species at risk of extinction: https://relay.nationalgeographic.com/proxy/distribution/public/amp/environment/2019/05/ipbes-un-biodiversity-report-warns-one-million-species-at-risk https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01448-4?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=ef727151d6-briefing-dy-20190507&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-ef727151d6-43627441 Dinosaur flapping origins: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190502143530.htm https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006846 Hadrosaur radiations: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190502104822.htm https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/paleobiology/article/morphological-innovation-and-the-evolution-of-hadrosaurid-dinosaurs/4D62321E0AE849C957D5D37BC052D666 Origin of flowering plants: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41477-019-0421-0 Another new Tyrannosaur: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-019-0888-0 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190506111431.htm
Views: 21559 Ben G Thomas
Najbardziej rakotwórcze produkty z lodówki. Jak się chronić.
 
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Moja książka 👉 http://www.zneutralizujchemie.pl ---------- Prezentowany materiał nie stanowi porady o charakterze medycznym, ma wyłącznie charakter informacyjny i w rozumieniu obowiązujących przepisów nie może być traktowany jako specjalistyczna porada medyczna, forma diagnozy lub zalecenia w zakresie leczenia, ponadto nie może być podstawą do jakichkolwiek roszczeń. Autor oświadcza, że nie daje gwarancji przydatności treści materiału do określonego celu lub zastosowania oraz nie ponosi odpowiedzialności za jakiekolwiek szkody będące konsekwencją korzystania lub niemożności korzystania z materiału. Użytkownik kierując się wyłącznie informacjami uzyskanymi za pośrednictwem materiału działa na własną odpowiedzialność. ---PIŚMIENNICTWO--- ⇓ AZOTYN SODU E250 i NITROZOAMINY = Toxicology and Environmental Health Sciences September 2017, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 244–250 = Fermented Meats pp 53-68 = Autoxidation in Food and Biological Systems pp 387-403 = Nutrition Journal December 2009, 8:1 = http://www.piwet.pulawy.pl/doc/biuletyn_46-2/domanska_335.pdf = https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267869010_Rapid_determination_of_nitrosamines_in_sausage_and_salami_using_microwave-assisted_extraction_and_dispersive_liquid-_liquid_microextraction_followed_by_gas_chromatography-mass_spectrometry = https://www.iarc.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pr240_E.pdf = https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/content/profiles//nitrosamines.pdf = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24200576 = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609975/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690057/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16865769 = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3108955/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29274927 = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28070638 ⇓ WITAMINA C, NITROZOAMINY oraz % TŁUSZCZU = https://gut.bmj.com/content/56/12/1678 ⇓ AZOTYNY I CUKRZYCA TYP 1 = European Journal of Epidemiology March 2006, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 245–247 = Diabetologia October 2011, 54:2483 = https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s001250051212.pdf = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7955990/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2925303/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1468277 ⇓ METHEMOGLOBINEMIA = Environmental Health December 2010, 9:60 = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti... = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti... = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1... ⇓ CHOROBA ALZHEIMERA = The Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease January 2019, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 50–55 = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2952429/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705810/ ⇓ KWAS SJALOWY = Glycoscience: Biology and Medicine pp 1-6 = Glycoconjugate Journal April 2018, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 139–160 = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5985449/ = https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025361/
Views: 158713 Zneutralizuj Chemię
Molecular variation | Cellular energetics | AP Biology | Khan Academy
 
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How molecular variation in cells helps organisms adapt in different environments and stages of development. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/science/ap-biology/cellular-energetics/molecular-fitness/v/molecular-variation Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 2936 Khan Academy
Developmental biology part 2 : clevage of zygote, polarity and differentiation
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Embryogenesis is the step in the life cycle after fertilisation -- the development of the embryo, starting from the zygote (fertilised egg). Organisms can differ drastically in how the embryo develops, especially when they belong to different phyla. For example, embryonal development in placental mammals starts with cleavage of the zygote into eight uncommited cells, which then form a ball (morula). The outer cells become the trophectoderm or trophoblast, which will form in combination with maternal uterine endometrial tissue the placenta, needed for fetal nurturing via maternal blood, while inner cells become the inner cell mass that will form all fetal organs (the bridge between these two parts eventually forms the umbilical cord). In contrast, the fruit fly zygote first forms a sausage-shaped syncytium, which is still one cell but with many cell nuclei.[18] Patterning is important for determining which cells develop into which organs. This is mediated by signaling between adjacent cells by proteins on their surfaces, and by gradients of signaling secreted molecules.[19] An example is retinoic acid, which forms a gradient in the head to tail direction in animals. Retinoic acid enters cells and activates Hox genes in a concentration-dependent manner -- Hox genes differ in how much retinoic acid they require for activation and will thus show differential rostral expression boundaries, in a colinear fashion with their genomic order. As Hox genes code for transcription factors, this causes different activated combinations of both Hox and other genes in discrete anteroposterior transverse segments of the neural tube (neuromeres) and related patterns in surrounding tissues, such as branchial arches, lateral mesoderm, neural crest, skin and endoderm, in the head to tail direction.[20] This is important for e.g. the segmentation of the spine in vertebrates.[19] Embryonic development does not always proceed correctly, and errors can result in birth defects or miscarriage. Often the reason is genetic (mutation or chromosome abnormality), but there can be environmental influence (like teratogens) or stochastic events.[21][22] Abnormal development caused by mutation is also of evolutionary interest as it provides a mechanism for changes in body plan (see evolutionary developmental biology).[2 Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 98986 Shomu's Biology