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Fossil Fuels 101
 
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Fossil fuel is a term used to describe a group of energy sources that were formed when ancient plants and organisms were subject to intense heat and pressure over millions of years. Learn more about the fossil fuels and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 721370 Student Energy
Will Fossil Fuels Run Out? | Earth Lab
 
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Greg Foot looks into the dirty world of fossil fuels. Will we run out of fossil fuels and what cost will we likely pay for their use? Footnotes 1 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html and https://www.theguardian.com/science/2009/feb/07/first-dinosaurs-late-triassic 2 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html 3- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 4- https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/pdf/energy-economics/statistical-review-2015/bp-statistical-review-of-world-energy-2015-full-report.pdf 5- http://fortune.com/2016/07/05/oil-reserves-us/ 6- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 7- http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidblackmon/2013/07/16/as-fracking-rises-peak-oil-theory-slowly-dies/#7bc2bf0c589b 8- https://www.eia.gov/energy_in_brief/article/shale_in_the_united_states.cfm 9- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2013/jul/23/peak-oil-bbc-shale-fracking-economy-recession 10- http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013EO280001/abstract 11- http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2016/08/17/490375230/oil-3-how-fracking-changed-the-world 12- https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-13/saudi-arabia-overtakes-u-s-as-largest-oil-producer-iea-says 13 - http://climate.nasa.gov/ and http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/05/26/climate_change_denying_reality_is_a_threat_to_our_nation.html 14 https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases 15 http://www.carbontracker.org/resources/ and https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 16 - https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-age-of-wind-and-solar-is-closer-than-you-think/ Subscribe for more awesome science - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HeadsqueezeTV http://www.youtube.com/user/HeadsqueezeTV
Views: 403519 BBC Earth Lab
Fossil Fuels
 
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024 - Fossil Fuels In this video Paul Andersen explains how fossil fuels are formed when organic material is heating and squeezed in an anaerobic environment. Formation, extraction, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed for coal, petroleum and natural gas. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: BLM, T. P. F. office of the. (2007). English: A natural gas drilling rig on the Pinedale Anticline, just west of Wyoming’s Wind River Range. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rig_wind_river.jpg Bobjgalindo. (2004). English: Gas prices, may 2004, Sinclair gas station, Oregon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GasPriceOR.jpg Coal formation. (n.d.). Retrieved November 20, 2015, from https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13598459184/ Company, N. I. O. (1970). Bidboland gas refinery Aghajary Iran. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bidboland_gas_refinery.jpg Delphi234. (2014). English: Total world energy consumption by source 2013, from REN21 Renewables 2014 Global Status Report. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Total_World_Energy_Consumption_by_Source_2013.png Diatom. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/174569/diatom English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg John, J. S. (2013). English: Tar sandstone from the Monterey Formation of Miocene age. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tar_Sandstone_California.jpg Knight, A. E. (2015). English: A sign for a Sinclair gas station. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sinclair_gas_station_sign.JPG Observatory, N. E. (2009). English: Athabasca Oil Sands NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Athabasca_oil_sands.jpg Plazak. (2015). English: Hubbert’s upper-bound prediction for US crude oil production (1956), and actual lower-48 states production through 2014. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_Upper-Bound_Peak_1956.png Unknown. (2004). English: Coal mine in Wyoming. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_mine_Wyoming.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg User. (2011). English: Chu Huo in Kenting, Taiwan. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chuhuo.jpg Wikipedia, F. at E. (2007). English: A pumpjack in Texas. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oil_well.jpg Wikipedia, S. at E. (2007). English: Castle Gate Power Plant near Helper by David Jolley 2007. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Castle_Gate_Power_Plant,_Utah_2007.jpg Wikipedia, T. original uploader was D. at E. (2004). Coal cars in Ashtabula, Ohio. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ashtabulacoalcars_e2.jpg Wikipedia, W. at E. (2007). Outcrop of Ordovician oil shale (kukersite), northern Estonia. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OilShaleEstonia.jpg Zooplankton silhouette. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/170815/zooplankton-silhouette
Views: 105236 Bozeman Science
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Energy from fossil fuels
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at how fossil fuels are used for energy. First we explore the advantages of using fossil fuels and then we look at the negative aspects.
Views: 76699 Freesciencelessons
Fossil Fuel || जीवाश्म ईंधन || Class - X || Science [ In Hindi & English]
 
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We have seen some of the issues involved in the conservation and sustainable use of resources like forests, wild-life and water. These can meet our needs perpetually if we were to use them in a sustainable manner. Now we come to yet another important resource – fossil fuels, that is, coal and petroleum, which are important sources of energy for us. Since the industrial revolution, we have been using increasing amounts of energy to meet our basic needs and for the manufacture of a large number of goods upon which our lives depend. These energy needs have been largely met by the reserves of coal and petroleum. The management of these energy sources involves slightly different perspectives from those resources discussed earlier. Coal and petroleum were formed from the degradation of bio-mass millions of years ago and hence these are resources that will be exhausted in the future no matter how carefully we use them. And then we would need to look for alternative sources of energy. Various estimates as to how long these resources will last us exist and one is that at present rates of usage, our known petroleum resources will last us for about forty years and the coal resources will last for another two hundred years.
Views: 20286 Vivek Kumar Srivastava
What Are Fossil Fuels? | National Geographic
 
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What are fossil fuels? How were they formed? Learn how human use of non-renewable energy sources, such coal, oil, and natural gas, affect climate change. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta What Are Fossil Fuels? | National Geographic https://youtu.be/YTnE0OQPTEo National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 52276 National Geographic
How are fossil fuels formed?
 
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CBSE class 10 Science - Sources of energy - Petroleum, Coal, Natural Gas are all known as the fossil fuels. Formation of fossil fuels happened millions of years ago. The dead plants and animals got buried into the oceans and rivers, and with the effect of Pressure and Temperature broke down into simpler products and the final product was the fossil fuels. Coal was formed by the remains of the plants whereas the Petroleum was formed by aquatic marine life. Since it takes millions of years in the formation of the fossil fuels hence these are non-renewable sources of energy. Petroleum products are generally used for running the vehicles and the coal is majorly used in the thermal plants to generate electricity. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 31783 PrepOnGo
Where Does All Our Oil Come From?
 
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We rely on oil to power our lives, but how do we go about getting it? How does oil even form? Read More: Fossil Fuel http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/f/fossil_fuel.htm "Fossil fuels are hydrocarbons, primarily coal, fuel oil or natural gas, formed from the remains of dead plants and animals." If We Dig Out All Our Fossil Fuels, Here's How Hot We Can Expect It to Get http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/upshot/if-we-dig-out-all-our-fossil-fuels-heres-how-hot-we-can-expect-it-to-get.html?abt=0002&abg=1 "World leaders are once again racing to avert disastrous levels of global warming through limits on greenhouse gas emissions." How Oil Drilling Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/oil-drilling4.htm "Once the equipment is at the site, the crew sets the rig up." How Hydraulic Fracking Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydraulic-fracking.htm "With tumultuous gas prices and dependence on unsustainable fossil fuels at a high, there's a desperate need to find alternative energy sources" How do we get oil and gas out of the ground? http://www.world-petroleum.org/index.php?/Education/how-do-we-get-oil-and-gas-out-of-the-ground.html "Oil and gas can get trapped in pockets underground such as where the rocks are folded into an umbrella shape." A cleaner way to get petroleum out of oil sands http://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-process-washes-the-petroleum-off-oil-sands/ "The secret to business is buy low and sell high. Canadian holding company MCW Energy Group hopes to do that by economically separating the petroleum from oil sands and then selling it at market rates of double to triple the processing costs." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Julia Wilde on Twitter https://twitter.com/julia_sci DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 150045 Seeker
Renewable Energy 101 | National Geographic
 
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There are many benefits to using renewable energy resources, but what is it exactly? From solar to wind, find out more about alternative energy, the fastest-growing source of energy in the world—and how we can use it to combat climate change. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Select footage courtesy NASA https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11056 Read more in "Renewable energy, explained" https://on.natgeo.com/2I5gp3L Renewable Energy 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/1kUE0BZtTRc National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 412557 National Geographic
Non-Renewable Energy Resources | GCSE Physics | Doodle Science
 
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Follow me!: https://twitter.com/DoodleSci Doodle Science teaches you high school physics in a less boring way in almost no time! Script: Fossil fuels are non-renewable energy resources; these are coal, oil and natural gas. They were formed from the remains of living organisms millions of years ago and they release heat energy when they are burned. This heat is used to turn water into steam, which is used to turn a turbine, which then drives a generator to generate electricity. There are downsides however, fossil fuels release sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide which lead to acid rain and an increase in global warming. Another form of non-renewable energy is Nuclear. The main nuclear fuels are uranium and plutonium. The nuclei of these large atoms are split in a process called nuclear fission to release a great deal of heat. The heat energy is again used to boil water. The kinetic energy in the expanding steam spins turbines, which then drive generators to produce electricity. Unlike fossil fuels, nuclear fuels do not produce carbon or sulphur dioxide. However, they do have the risk of a fault where large amounts of radioactive material could be released into the environment such as the disaster of Chernobyl in 1986.
Views: 145724 DoodleScience
GCSE Science (1-9): Physics: Energy resources - fossil fuels and turbines
 
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A handy guide to energy resources from five minute physics. Perfect for the new AQA GCSE. Specification reference 4.1.3a
Views: 552 five minute physics
Oil 101
 
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Oil is a fossil fuel and liquid hydrocarbon used mainly for the production of transportation fuels and petroleum-based products. Learn more about oil and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 73982 Student Energy
Fossil Fuels vs Renewable Energy Sources
 
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-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 65303 Milind Amritkar
Oil and Gas Formation
 
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A fast paced explanation of how many oil and gas deposits form and how we explore for them.
Renewable Energy Explained in 2 1/2 Minutes
 
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This is an unofficial explainer video I created for a college project. I decided to gear it toward TheSolutionsProject.org. The assets went from Adobe Illustrator to After Effects. This animation explains the different types of energy such as, fossil fuels, biomass, nuclear and renewables. Written, animated and illustrated by Dane Bliss Music by: Essa: https://soundcloud.com/essa-1 Voiceover by: Mike Porter: https://goo.gl/GNouYE Visit my online portfolio to see some more work at http://www.DaneBliss.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaneBlissDesign Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dane-Bliss-Graphic-Design-813194572110628/timeline/ German translation by Robert Orzanna Twitter: https://twitter.com/orschiro
Views: 486355 Dane Bliss Design
Which Power Source Is Most Efficient?
 
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Australian researchers just unveiled the most efficient solar panels ever. How efficient are they, and what is the most efficient source of energy? Get 15% off http://www.domain.com's s domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code DNEWS at checkout! Read More: In world first -- UNSW researchers convert sunlight to electricity with over 40 percent efficiency http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-12/uons-iwf120514.php "UNSW Australia's solar researchers have converted over 40% of the sunlight hitting a solar system into electricity, the highest efficiency ever reported." New world record for solar cell efficiency at 46% French-German cooperation confirms competitive advantages of European photovoltaic industry http://www.ise.fraunhofer.de/en/press-and-media/press-releases/press-releases-2014/new-world-record-for-solar-cell-efficiency-at-46-percent "A new world record for the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity has been established." Australia develops world's most efficient solar panels http://rt.com/business/212383-australia-record-solar-energy/ "?Australian researchers have developed a new method of using commercial solar panels that converts more electricity from sunlight than ever before." What is the efficiency of different types of power plants? http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=107&t=3 "One measure of the efficiency of a power plant that converts a fuel into heat and into electricity is the heat rate." Improving Efficiencies http://www.worldcoal.org/coal-the-environment/coal-use-the-environment/improving-efficiencies/ "Improving efficiency levels increases the amount of energy that can be extracted from a single unit of coal." The Most Common Electricity Sources in the U.S. http://pureenergies.com/us/blog/the-most-common-electricity-sources-in-the-u-s/ "Though renewable energy is growing fast, the U.S. still gets the vast majority of its power from conventional power plants." Increasing the Efficiency of Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43343.pdf "Coal has long been the major fossil fuel used to produce electricity." Coal Will Survive as Efficient Power Plants Boost Demand http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-02/coal-seen-surving-as-efficient-power-plants-boost-demand.html "President Barack Obama's plan to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions left coal with a future even as the industry accuses him of trying to make the fuel obsolete." How Do Wind Turbines Work? http://energy.gov/eere/wind/how-do-wind-turbines-work "So how do wind turbines make electricity?" Screwy-looking wind turbine makes little noise and a big claim http://www.gizmag.com/the-archimedes-liam-f1-urban-wind-turbine/32263/ "Although it's getting increasingly common to see solar panels on the roofs of homes, household wind turbines are still a fairly rare sight." Betz's law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betz%27s_law Wind Energy More Energy Efficient than Fossil Fuels http://cleantechnica.com/2012/07/18/wind-energy-energy-efficient-fossil-fuels-uk/ "Here's something that may surprise you. Wind energy is more efficient than carbon-based fuels." Wind Energy's Shadow: Turbines Drag Down Power Potential http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/05/130516-wind-energy-shadow-effect/ "As seemingly limitless as the air that swirls around us, wind has proven to be the world's fastest-growing source of renewable energy." Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle/Power-Reactors/Advanced-Nuclear-Power-Reactors/ "The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for more than five decades and is starting to build the next generation of nuclear power reactors to fill new orders." Hydroelectric Power http://www.mpoweruk.com/hydro_power.htm "Hydro-electric power, using the potential energy of rivers, now supplies 17.5% of the world's electricity (99% in Norway, 57% in Canada, 55% in Switzerland, 40% in Sweden, 7% in USA)." Hydroelectric Power http://www.usbr.gov/power/edu/pamphlet.pdf "It's a form of energy ... a renewable resource." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 675230 Seeker
Non-renewable energy sources: Fossil fuels and Nuclear
 
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A explanation of fossil fuels and nuclear energy for AP Environmental Science students.
Views: 517 Lisa Bagley
Power stations and the national grid | Electricity | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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The flick of a switch, that’s how easy it is to get electricity, right? If you’re one of the lucky ones, then yes. But in 2017 there are still over 1 billion people who do not have access to electricity. In this video we will discuss how electricity is generated and transferred to our homes, for those of us fortunate enough to have it. There are a variety of ways in which electricity is generated or made. How many can you think of? Solar panels, Wind turbines, Biomass, hydroelectric, nuclear and fossil fuels And then there is also geothermal energy, tidal power and wave power as well. Except for burning fossil fuels and nuclear, the rest are renewable sources of energy. Currently about 80% of the world’s energy comes from fossil fuels. First, we’re going to have a look at burning fossil fuels in power stations, to generate energy. And then we’ll look at the national grid - which is relevant for both non-renewable and renewable energies. Fossil fuels in power stations. Most power stations use coal as an energy source, and they work in the following way. Coal is burned in a power station. The heat produced as the coal burns is used to heat water. The water boils and turns into steam. This steam is used to turn the blades of a turbine. A turbine looks like a fan or a wind turbine. The turbine turns a generator. Inside, wires turn within magnets to generate electricity. So that was a fossil fuel power station. These next steps are for energy generated from any source - whether it’s fossil fuels or renewable like wind-powered substations or biomass fuelled. The electricity, whether renewable or not, is passed through transformers and wires, within the national grid, that carries it to our homes. So, what exactly is the National Grid? The National Grid is a system of cables and transformers linking power stations to consumers. Have you ever felt an electrical wire and noticed it gets hot? This is because some energy travelling through the wire is lost as heat. In order to lose as little energy as possible, transformers are used. When the electricity leaves the power station it passes through a step-up transformer. Power station @ 25,000 V A step-up transformer increases the voltage and reduces the current. National grid cables @ 275,000 V Reducing the current makes the transfer of electricity more efficient, as less energy is lost as heat. Before the electricity gets to our homes, the voltage needs to be reduced back down to a safe level. The electricity therefore passes through a step down transformer. Household @ 230 V So, now you know how electricity is generated and sent to our homes, it’s not quite as simple as flicking a switch. Quite a lot of infrastructure is needed. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Humans and Energy: Crash Course World History 207
 
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In which Stan Muller subs for John Green and teaches you about energy and humanity. Today we discuss the ideas put forth by Alfred Crosby in his book, Children of the Sun. Historically, almost all of the energy that humans use has been directly or indirectly generated by the sun, whether that be food energy from plants, wind energy, direct solar energy, or fossil fuels. Stan looks into these different sources, and talks about how humanity will continue to use energy in the future as populations grow and energy resources become more scarce. You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. SUBBABLE SPONSOR MESSAGES! TO: Dana FROM: Cameron you're wonderful, I can't wait for our faces to meet :) TO: TheGeekyBlonde FROM: Arbace Thanks for your outstanding Youtube Abuse Recovery video! http://youtu.be/3Uc5eNNG60o You can get Alfred Crosby's Children of the Sun here: http://smile.amazon.com/Children-Sun-Humanitys-Unappeasable-Appetite/dp/0393931536/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409260623&sr=8-1&keywords=crosby+children+of+the+sun
Views: 1112178 CrashCourse
How to fuel the future | The Economist
 
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America, under President Donald Trump, is securing its “energy independence” with oil and gas. But unlike fossil fuels, renewables will not increase global warming —and China is moving fast. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Oil moves the world around and creates powerful countries. Oil is such a vital commodity that it provoked wars throughout the 20th century. The few countries that produce it, try to keep control of it to ensure its riches stay at home. Those who do not have it, strive to get it. In the 1930s Saudi Arabia was one of the poorest countries in the world but the discovery of oil transformed it and Saudi Arabia has amassed $515.6 billion in sovereign wealth funds. It has become the linchpin of a powerful cartel that sometimes rations oil to push up prices. The United States is now the biggest producer of oil and gas owing to its shale revolution. It has tapped abundant reserves through fracking - a technology that uses high-pressure water and sand to fracture rock deep below the ground to extract hydrocarbons. This shale revolution has helped the United States become less dependent on oil imported from Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Iraq, and other OPEC countries. More oil and gas on global markets has also benefited the world's energy consumers by pushing down costs. Oil still remains the primary fuel, supplying almost 1/3 of the world's energy but its heyday may soon be over, despite growing demand. By 2040 the world's global energy use is set to increase by 30 percent. That energy must be much cleaner if the world wants to prevent catastrophic global warming. In the past coal and gas were less expensive than renewable technology but their costs have come down dramatically. There is now a race among some nations to create more efficient renewable technologies to reduce pollution and be more energy self-sufficient. China is the world's largest consumer of coal and the second largest of oil but it also now leads the world in clean energy. one third of the world's new wind power and solar panels is installed in China, and it sells more electric cars than any other country. The quest for energy self-sufficiency is a big motivation for many countries. China is moving fast, and America under President Donald Trump, is securing its energy independence with oil and gas. But unlike oil and gas renewables will not increase global warming. The long term transition to clean energy will throw up new global challenges. It will create tensions in unstable parts of the Middle East as oil revenue starts to dry up. Another challenge is that wind and sun are intermittent. renewables may require vast shared electricity grids spanning boarders to make them more efficient. To stop global warming the world needs a huge collaboration over our shared energy future. If we fail, wars over scarce resources could be even worse in the 21st century than in the 20th. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 78893 The Economist
Can 100% renewable energy power the world? - Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei
 
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Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-100-renewable-energy-power-the-world-federico-rosei-and-renzo-rosei Every year, the world uses 35 billion barrels of oil. This massive scale of fossil fuel dependence pollutes the earth, and it won’t last forever. On the other hand, we have abundant sun, water and wind, which are all renewable energy sources. So why don’t we exchange our fossil fuel dependence for an existence based only on renewables? Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei describe the challenges. Lesson by Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei, directed by Giulia Martinelli. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! David & Pamela Fialkoff, Miami Beach Family, Kostadin Mandulov, Kyoung-Rok Jang, Alex Schenkman, Hachik Masis Bagdatyan, Sdiep Sriram, Ivan Todorović, Antero Semi, Yanuar Ashari, Mrinalini , Anthony Kudolo, Scott Gass, Querida Owens, David Lucsanyi, Hazel Lam, Jhiya Brooks, Manav parmar, Dwight Tevuk , Stephen A. Wilson, Siamak H, Minh Tran, Dominik Kugelmann, Michel Reyes, Katie Winchester, Mary Sawyer, Ryan Mehendale, David Rosario, Samuel Doerle, Be Owusu, Susan Herder, Savannah Scheelings, Prasanth Mathialagan, Yanira Santamaria, Chad Harper, Dawn Jordan, Constantin Salagor, Activated Classroom Teaching, Kevin Wong, Umar Farooq, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Mohammad Khory, Dmitry Neverov, Tushar Sharma, Mukamik, Cristóbal Medina Moenne, Silas Schwarz, Fabio Peters, MJ Tan Mingjie, Yansong Li, Jason A Saslow, Michael Aquilina, Joanne Luce, Ayaan Heban, Henry Li, Elias Wewel, Kyle Nguyen, Taylor Hunter, Noa Shore, Lex Azevedo, Merit Gamertsfelder, Bev Millar, Rishi Pasham, Jhuval, SookKwan Loong, Daniel Day, Nick Johnson.
Views: 665741 TED-Ed
Joe Rogan - Elon Musk on the Future of Fossil Fuel
 
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Taken from Joe Rogan Experience #1169: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycPr5-27vSI
Views: 794852 JRE Clips
Fossil Fuels: The Greenest Energy
 
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To make earth cleaner, greener and safer, which energy sources should humanity rely on? Alex Epstein of the Center for Industrial Progress explains how modern societies have cleaned up our water, air and streets using the very energy sources you may not have expected--oil, coal and natural gas. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: What if I told you that someone had developed an energy source that could help us solve our biggest environmental challenges, purify our water and air, make our cities and homes more sanitary, and keep us safe from potential catastrophic climate change? What if I also told you that this energy source was cheap, plentiful, and reliable? Well, there is such a source. You probably know it as fossil fuel. Oil. Natural gas. Coal. But wait? Don’t fossil fuels pollute our environment and make our climate unlivable? That, of course, is what we’re told…and what our children are taught. But let’s look at the data. Here’s a graph you’ve probably never seen: the correlation between use of fossil fuels and access to clean water. More fossil fuel. More clean water. Am I saying the more we that we have used fossil fuel, the cleaner our water has become? Yes, that’s exactly what I’m saying. In the developed world, we take clean water for granted. We turn on a tap and it’s there. But getting it there takes a massive amount of energy. Think of the man-made reservoirs, the purification plants, the network of pipes. In the undeveloped world, it’s a much different story. They lack the energy, so they lack clean water. More fossil fuel. More clean water. The same is true of sanitation. By the use of cheap, plentiful, and reliable energy from fossil fuels, we have made our environment cleaner. Take a look at this graph. More fossil fuel. Better sanitation. Okay, what about air quality? Here’s a graph of the air pollution trends in the United States over the last half century based on data from the Environmental Protection Agency. Note the dramatic downward trend in emissions, even though we use more fossil fuel than ever. How was this achieved? Above all, by using anti-pollution technology powered by…fossil fuel: oil, natural gas and coal. But even without modern pollution control technology, fossil fuel makes our air cleaner. Indoor pollution—caused by burning a fire inside your house, cabin, hut or tent to cook and keep warm—was a deadly global problem until the late 19th century when cheap kerosene, a fossil fuel byproduct, became available in America and Europe. Indoor pollution is still a major issue in the developing world today. The best solution? Fossil fuel. And now we come to the biggest fossil fuel concern of all—global warming. On this very sensitive topic we need to get our terms straight: There is a big difference between mild global warming and catastrophic global warming. We can all agree on that, right? The issue isn’t: does burning fossil fuel have some warming impact? It does. The issue is: is the climate warming dangerously fast? In 1986 NASA climate scientist James Hansen—one of the world’s most prominent critics of the use of fossil fuels—predicted that “if current trends are unchanged,” temperatures would rise 2 to 4 degrees in the first decade of the 2000s. But as you can see from this graph, since 2000 the trend line is essentially flat—little or no warming in the last 15 years. That’s probably why we hear much less talk about “global warming” and much more talk about “climate change.” For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/fossil-fuels-greenest-energy
Views: 756889 PragerU
Different Sources of Energy, Using Energy Responsibly, Educational Video for Kids
 
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Learning about the different sources of energy. The difference between renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Learn ways to conserve energy right at home, and make a difference! Recommended for grades: 4 - 6. Kids Educ SUBSCRIBE TO US http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc?sub_confirmation=1 To see the more kids movies go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Renewable sources of energy
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at the advantages and disadvantages of renewable sources of energy. We explore solar, wind and hydro and then move on to other sources such as geothermal, tidal, wave and biofuels.
Views: 95223 Freesciencelessons
How Were Fossil Fuels Formed?
 
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In this narrated slideshow, you will learn more about how one fossil fuel -- "shale gas" -- formed in the Earth thousands of feet below certain parts of the United States. Learn more about this video, including educational resources, from QUEST: http://ow.ly/uf4b8 This video is part of our Challenges of Non-Renewable Energy educational series: http://ow.ly/uf4ix
Views: 11260 KQED QUEST
Fossil fuels - the rate we use them
 
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Full-length film: http://youtu.be/RejAjfRkVuc The world gets through a lot of fossil fuels: • 7,896.4 million metric tons of coal in 2013 (21.6 million metric tons per day, 250 metric tons per second) • 91,330,895 barrels of oil per day in 2013 (168 m3 per second) • 3,347.63 billion m3 of natural gas in 2013 (9.2 km3 per day, 106,082 m3 per second) This film tries to make those numbers physically meaningful – to make the quantities ‘real’; more than ‘just numbers’. All the graphics in the film are based on real quantities. • The coal we use each day would form a pile 236 metres high and 673 metres across. We could fill a volume the size of the UN Secretariat Building with coal every 17 minutes. • At the rate we use oil, we could fill an Olympic swimming pool every 15 seconds. We could fill a volume the size of the UN Secretariat Building with oil every 30 minutes. • The rate at which we use natural gas is equivalent to gas travelling along a pipe with an internal diameter of 60 metres at hurricane speeds (135 km/h / 84 mph). We could fill a volume the size of the UN Secretariat Building with natural gas in under 3 seconds. We use a cubic kilometre of gas every 2 hours 37 minutes and a cubic mile of the stuff every 10 hours 54 minutes. The world’s use of fossil fuels is increasing, not decreasing. Renewable energy will help, but it cannot keep up with the demand for energy. The International Renewable Energy Agency’s most optimistic road-map suggests that renewables will not displace fossil fuels for decades, which is a problem because we are adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at an increasing rate. For the full film, which looks at the energy economy as a whole and the need for Carbon Capture and Storage see: http://youtu.be/RejAjfRkVuc Details, calculations and sources for all the numbers in the film are available in a methodology document: http://www.carbonvisuals.com/media/item/735/559/Methodology-CCS_a_2_degree_solution.pdf This is a Carbon Visuals film for WBCSD www.carbonvisuals.com
Views: 4754 Real World Visuals
Thanks, Fossil Fuels
 
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Happy Thanksgiving! While you’re taking time to be thankful for your friends, family, food, drinks, and other luxuries, perhaps you should take a moment to say thank you to the resources that make this holiday so wonderful: fossil fuels. Watch to learn just how much oil, natural gas, and coal bring to the table during the holiday season (and every other day of the year) VISIT Clear Energy Alliance https://clearenergyalliance.com/ FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClearEnergyAlliance Twitter: https://twitter.com/clearenergy Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/clearenergyalliance For list of sources and downloadable transcript: https://clearenergyalliance.com/project/thanks-fossil-fuels/ Script: Here’s an unexpected twist on Thanksgiving. While we’re expressing our gratitude for family, friends, food, jobs and other good stuff, let’s include something extremely important that we mostly take for granted. This Thanksgiving let’s acknowledge oil, natural gas, and coal, for without them life would be much shorter, way harder and a lot less fun. Let’s get real here. By historical standards, most of us are living in amazing, exciting future-land. We could spend hours, days really, talking about all the ways that fossil fuels make our lives healthy, productive, comfortable, safe and generally pretty great. But, for the sake of brevity, let’s just take a quick look at look at how we enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday. For starters, very few of us actually have to work on Thanksgiving or the day after, or Saturday and Sunday. It’s a four-day holiday! For about 99.9 percent of human existence, four days of doing nothing but eating, shopping and goofing off would have been unthinkable. The only reason we can take such a long break is that we invented all kinds of machines to do our work for us and all of those machines were manufactured and are powered by fossil fuels. Just imagine all the cars, trucks, trains, planes and ships that were used to bring all that good food to your home, as well as all those important people in your life. Most of the meat, vegetables, breads, beverages, and sweet confections came from hundreds or even thousands of miles away. And don’t forget about the big machines that produced all that food in the first place. Fossil fuels aided by some strong hands did that work. And, by the way, natural gas and oil were used as feedstocks for all the plastics, rubber, lubricants and a multitude of petrochemicals used to package your Thanksgiving feast. Don’t forget about the natural gas range and the electric oven that are used to cook the food and keep it warm. Fossil fuel electricity also powers the lights, the air conditioning, furnace, the TV, phones, and tablets. The water heater is there for everything from meal prep through the clean-up, as is the refrigerator and the dishwasher is pretty handy, too. Ok. I know. You get it. I don’t need to mention that oil, natural gas, and coal were used to bring you the seemingly countless football, basketball and hockey games.... or that lots of fossil fuel will be used when buying up everything under the sun on Black Friday. Although… I guess I just did. Yes... let’s recognize it’s not just fossil fuels that are deserving of our gratitude. Nuclear, hydropower and other renewables deserve some credit as well. But, since fossil fuels pull 80 percent of our energy load, which includes manufacturing all other energy technologies, that’s why fossil fuels should get the bulk of our praise. Of course, be thankful for your family and friends, your faith, your country, your job, and even your favorite beer. But while you’re feeling grateful, give thanks to those hard-working people that produced the fossil fuels that work so hard for you on Thanksgiving and every other day of the year. Happy Thanksgiving. For the Clear Energy Alliance, I’m Mark Mathis. Power On.
Views: 72172 Clear Energy Alliance
Is there an alternative to fossil fuels?
 
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Green Biologics are a renewable chemicals company who are not only changing the face of renewable chemicals, but are changing the world while they are at it. Dr Liz Jenkinson is one of the lead researchers at the company, and it is her work that is providing the answer to the question: is there an alternative to fossil fuels? Her work proves that the answer is yes, and that it only relies on three key components – bacteria, genetic engineering and sugar.
Views: 13204 Science Animated
If Green Energy Is So Great, Why Aren't We Using It?
 
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Green energy is getting better and cheaper, yet we still largely rely on fossil fuels. Why haven't we switched to solar and wind energy yet? Which Countries Will Be Underwater Due To Climate Change? - https://youtu.be/1ilC2ODaWSY Which Countries Run On 100% Renewable Energy? - https://youtu.be/SrmsQzRQPPw Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: What Would Happen If We Burned All The Fossil Fuels On Earth? http://www.popsci.com/burning-all-fossil-fuels-could-raise-sea-levels-by-200-feet "A new study published today in Science Advances finds that if we burn all of the remaining fossil fuels on Earth, almost all of the ice in Antarctica will melt, potentially causing sea levels to rise by as much as 200 feet--enough to drown most major cities in the world." Who's Winning The Battle To Replace Coal? http://www.forbes.com/sites/thebakersinstitute/2016/05/17/whos-winning-the-battle-to-replace-coal/#e9dc97c6b09f "Coal is losing the battle for the electricity future in the United States. Investment in new coal-fired generating capacity has dried up with its share of electricity generation dropping from 53% in 2000 to 34% in 2015." Electricity in the United States http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=electricity_in_the_United_States "In 2015, coal was used for about 33% of the 4 trillion kilowatthours of electricity generated in the United States. In addition to being burned to heat water for steam, natural gas can also be burned to produce hot combustion gases that pass directly through a natural gas turbine, spinning the turbine's blades to generate electricity." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Special thanks to Julian Huguet for hosting and writing this episode of DNews! Check Julian out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00
Views: 358087 Seeker
11 Advantages Of Fossil Fuels
 
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1. A major advantage of fossil fuels is their capacity to generate huge amounts of electricity in just a single location.  2. Fossil fuels provide a large amount of concentrated energy for a relatively low cost.  3. Safe to transport: Because fossil fuels are safe and stable, they can be transported easily and efficiently over long distances. 4. Easier to Find: Fossil fuels are actually very easy to find. They occur all over the world, usually in very rich veins deep inside the earth, which means that, once we have committed to getting coal or gas out of the ground or out from under the sea, we are guaranteed to get a lot of resources from that particular area.  5. When coal is used in power plants, they are very cost effective.  6. Oil can be transported through the use of pipes, allowing it to be transported relatively easily. 7. Massive economic benefits 8. Generate Thousands of Jobs: Fossil fuels generate hundreds of thousands of jobs every year.  9. Power stations that make use of fossil fuel can be constructed in almost any location. 10. High calorific value 11. Useful by product
Views: 2789 Patel Vidhu
Fossil Fuels | Global Weirding
 
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Fossil fuels are terrible. We would have been better off if the Industrial Revolution had never happened...right? The answer may surprise you.
300 Years of FOSSIL FUELS in 300 Seconds
 
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*** (19. MARCH 2011) WINNER OF YOUTUBE'S BEST NONPROFIT VIDEO AWARD!!! *** Fossil fuels have powered human growth and ingenuity for centuries. Now that we're reaching the end of cheap and abundant oil and coal supplies, we're in for an exciting ride. While there's a real risk that we'll fall off a cliff, there's still time to control our transition to a post-carbon future. A deeper analysis of the crises we face, and possible solutions we can work on right now can be had HERE: http://j.mp/PCReader +++ TRANSLATIONS currently uploaded as Closed Captions -- Dutch, English, Hungarian, Italian, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish. OTHER TRANSLATIONS: SPANISH DUBBED: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wIydcOn_3kI PORTUGUESE: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9l6jkqv63lU HEBREW: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4zP4Xhj4AQ SIMPLIFIED CHINESE subtitles: http://www.tudou.com/playlist/p/l11764222i95039245.html TRADITIONAL CHINESE subtitles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOBSAYP1LpU FRENCH subtitles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5SaC-luI98, dubbed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeEU_uy4YrQ&feature=player_embedded SONG CREDIT: "Can I Kick It?" by Tribe Called Quest
Views: 1617168 postcarboninstitute
Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas
 
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Watch the following video to learn about: -The pros and cons of coal, oil and natural gas -The relative CO2 emissions of each fuel -Applying this information to make energy decisions This video was produced in 2014 as part of Introduction to Environmental Science (http://bit.ly/DartX_ENVX), offered as a MOOC by Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH, USA. The course ran February through March 2015 on http://edX.org. The course team includes: Professor Andrew Friedland, Instructor; Mike Goudzwaard, Instructional Designer and Co-Leader of Course; R. Michael Murray, Media Production; Sawyer Broadley, Video Editor.
Views: 13891 DART.ENVS.01.X
fossil fuels - advantages and disadvantages
 
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fossil fuels- advantages, disadvantage, and what to do with it.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 15313 anton teope
218. Alternative sources of Energy   IELTS Essay topic
 
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Fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas) are the main sources in many countries, but in some countries the use of alternative sources of energy (wind energy and solar energy) are encouraged. To what extent do you think it is a positive or negative development?
Views: 11921 MakkarIelts
Source of Energy {Fuels & Fossil Fuels} , (Conventional sources of energy)  Class 10 Science [Hindi]
 
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This video explains about the fuels and the fossil fuels which are the conventional sources of energy.In this video it is explained in very simple way. Hydro power plant and its working ::-- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tD83fi5ZTYg PLEASE LIKE, SHARE , & SUBSCRIBE .........
Views: 2093 We R Students
Mapping the world's energy sources
 
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The world produces electricity from three major sources: fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and renewables. Of the three, fossil fuels is still the most dominant. So how many countries would be left in the dark if we were to ban them tomorrow? The innovators at goCompare can answer that question with their interactive map that reveals the different sources of energy that power the world. -------------------------------------------------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ -------------------------------------------------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 18262 Business Insider
Freedom from fossil fuels is closer than you think  | Dhruvik Parikh | TEDxSnoIsleLibraries
 
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You might be wondering what a high school student can do to help address climate change. In his fascinating talk on his experimental research into energy independence, Dhruvik Parikh offers unique theories in the form of agricultural waste and “close-looped” systems where the waste of production can be used to fuel the next round of production creating local systems that are self-sustaining. Dhruvik also addresses concepts for community access to clean water and energy storage where whole communities work to develop their own collective renewable energy system. By examining the environmental and economic considerations of harnessing energies already available, Dhruhvik sees a future where cities can be self-sustaining and communities can thrive. Student at Henry M. Jackson High School, Mill Creek, Washington. Participant in a variety of clubs including the Technology Student Association and MIT Launch Club. Co-founded startup, Travalot, at the prestigious MIT Launch startup incubator. Managed strategy and operations for the company. Interested in finding solutions to the energy storage conundrum. Developed a novel method of biodiesel production using winery waste and engineered a membrane for redox flow batteries for superior conductivity. Is passionate about "distributed energy" and the equitable rollout of new technologies in developing countries. Well versed in Java and Python. Currently working on a deep learning approach to identify promising materials as components of redox flow batteries. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 7175 TEDx Talks
Renewable Energy: It Uses Practically No Water Compared to Fossil Fuels
 
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The Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently highlighted a little-discussed benefit of using renewables like wind and solar to produce electricity: Unlike most power sources, they require “almost no water.” This is remarkable because thermoelectric power generation is the leading use of water in America. (That said, only three percent of power generation's 133 billion gallons a day of water is considered “consumptive use,” as the U.S. Geological Survey says, “meaning it is lost to evaporation or blowdown during generation.”) According to the latest U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data from 2015, 41 percent of the water used in America is for power generation. The next highest use is irrigation for agriculture, accounting for 37 percent of U.S. water use (and close to two-thirds of that is consumptive). The Union of Concerned Scientists was raising this alarm in 2012 when the nonprofit created an infographic focused on the “energy-water collision,” which “refers to the range of issues that can crop up where our water resources and our power sector interact.” That can include increased competition for dwindling water sources and problems when the water going into or out of power plants is too warm. Why does producing electricity require so much water? As the Department of Energy (DOE) notes: “The main demand for water within a thermoelectric power plant is for condensing steam. Thermoelectric power generation typically converts the energy in a fuel source (fossil, nuclear, or biomass) to steam and then uses the steam to drive a turbine-generator.” This varies somewhat for natural gas, depending on the type of turbine. With many areas of the world, including large parts of America, already dealing with droughts and water shortages — problems expected to be exacerbated by climate change — the water intensity of power sources becomes another factor for local, state, and regional planners to consider. Coal’s Decline Brings Slight Progress The recent topline analysis from the EIA about water use for all energy sources in America is encouraging. Since 2014 the amount of water used to produce energy has been steadily declining. USGS data show this has been the trend since 2005: “The 2015 estimates put total withdrawals at the lowest level since before 1970, following the same overall trend of decreasing total withdrawals observed from 2005 to 2010.” Over a five year period from 2010 to 2015, water use for power generation dropped 18 percent. Much of this drop can be attributed to the decline in coal as a fuel source for electricity generation, as well as power plant closures and new plants implementing more water-efficient technologies. However, while the decline of the coal industry has meant power plants overall are using less water in the U.S., some of the power sources that are replacing coal, namely natural gas, are still highly dependent on water. While the natural gas industry’s claim that methane-rich gas is a cleaner “bridge fuel” to the future — an argument thoroughly debunked when accounting for globe-warming methane leaks in the supply chain — water use is another reason to consider wind and solar power over natural gas. Due to the various technologies used in natural gas power plants, some are more highly dependent on water than others. This variation makes it difficult to quantify just how much water natural gas power generation uses as a sector compared to coal. However, it is safe to say that natural gas power production uses less water than coal in general. Thus, the switch from coal to gas is contributing to the overal decline in water use for power generation, as the USGS and DOE say. As solar and wind become increasingly cost competitive with natural gas for electric power generation — especially in water-constrained areas of the country — they have the added advantage of being a water smart choice. Read more: https://www.desmogblog.com/2018/12/02/benefit-renewable-energy-uses-less-water-fossil-fuels Click here to subscribe to the DeSmog Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/DesmogBlog?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 76 DeSmog Blog
Why Renewable Energy Sources Can’t Replace Oil and Natural Gas
 
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Electricity stops flowing from solar panels when the sun goes down. But never fear: Traditional fuels keep energy flowing and the lights on when renewables don’t work. Learn more about how alternative energy and traditional fuels can work together in this video.
Notes: III Fossil Fuel Resources
 
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Complete the notes for Unit 4 Section 5 part III: Fossil Fuel resources. This includes Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas. (Recorded with http://screencast-o-matic.com)
Views: 60 Alexandra Woods
Use of Fossil Fuels
 
02:12
The use of fossil fuels can be replaced with solar panels, wind turbines and hydro power. Did this for my biology project.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 4959 April Gracia
SOURCES OF ENERGY: What are Fossil Fuels? - Class 10th & NTSE - 05/26
 
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Get Full Course Delivered at your Home: Call-9826023696 Visit our Website: https://www.m-learning.in Mail us at :[email protected] For Online Course: Download our app from Google Play Store and App Store Join Classroom Course at Indore. Fossil fuel: fuels which are obtained from the remains of plants and animals are called fossil fuels. Ex- coal and petroleum. Fossil fuels are non-renewable sources of energy so we need to conserve them. Fossil fuels are fuels formed by natural processes such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms, containing energy originating in ancient photosynthesis.[1] The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes exceeds 650 million years.[2] Fossil fuels contain high percentages of carbon and include petroleum, coal, and natural gas.[3] Other commonly used derivatives include kerosene and propane. Fossil fuels range from volatile materials with low carbon to hydrogen ratios like methane, to liquids like petroleum, to nonvolatile materials composed of almost pure carbon, like anthracite coal. Methane can be found in hydrocarbon fields either alone, associated with oil, or in the form of methane clathrates. Harmful effects of fossil fuels The oxides of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur that are released on burning fossils fuels acidic oxides. These lead to acid rain which affects our water and soil resources. The problem air pollution and the green house effect of gases like carbon dioxide. The pollution caused by burning fossil fuels can be reduced by increasing the efficiency of the combustion process and using various techniques to reduce the escape of harmful gases and ashes into the surroundings
Views: 2830 M Learning India
Coal, Oil and Natural Gas
 
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This video describes how fossil fuels such as oil, gas, and coal are formed and where they can be found. We set up side-by-side comparisons of what these materials are made of, how they develop, and the settings where they are preserved. We discuss how US consumption and production trends for oil and coal have changed in recent years. Visit our blog for free assessment questions about the content in this video: https://geosciencevideos.wordpress.com
Views: 36384 GeoScience Videos
Renewable and Non-Renewable Energy Resources in Hindi
 
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The difference between renewable and non-renewable resources can be done on the basis of their usage life, carbon emission, quantity available, maintenance cost, environment friendly nature, land area required for installation and much more. The energy resources which cannot be exhausted and can be used again and again are called renewable energy resources. For example solar energy, wind energy, tidal energy and hydroelectric etc. The energy resources which can be exhausted one day and cannot be used repeatedly are called non-renewable energy resources. The example of non-renewable energy resources are coal, petroleum, natural gases etc. 1. The renewable energy resources can be depleted and used again and again. But the non-renewable resources are limited in number and can be depleted one day. 2. The carbon emission in renewable energy resources are very low and prevent global warming. In non renewable resources the carbon emission is large and contributes in global warming. 3.The renewable resources are cheaper and present in unlimited quantity but the non- renewable resources are costlier and present in limited quantity. 4. The life of renewable resources is infinite. In case of non-renewable resources the life is finite. 5. The maintenance cost for the power plant of renewable energy resources is low but it is high in the case of non-renewable energy resources. 6. Solar energy, wind energy, tidal energy and geothermal energy are called as renewable resources. Coal petroleum, natural gas, are called non-renewable resources. The wait is finally over. I am here with YouTube's very first Mechanical Engineering Channel in HINDI. In this channel i will upload videos related to mechanical engineering topics such as Automobile, Production, HMT, Thermodynamics, FM, CAD/CAM etc. So subscribe my channel and learn everyday Follow me on twitter: ⤵ https://twitter.com/dashingdanish11 Add me on Facebook: ⤵ https://www.facebook.com/danish.ali.754 Follow me on Instagram: ⤵ https://www.instagram.com/danish__mohammad/?hl=en Contact me: ⤵ [email protected]
Views: 5569 MECHANICAL TECH HINDI
More than a Fossil Fuel Energy Problem
 
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EXPERTS POINT TO PROBLEMS. HAS ANYONE OFFERED A PLAN TO FIX THE PROBLEMS? THE FOUNDATION HAS A PLAN. We empower the consumer to create change. We introduce an economic movement with environmental benefits. We compete with fossil fuel resources to stop the profits that cause unsafe practices, toxic products, and environmental carnage. We rebuild the middle class, alleviate poverty, and promote global trade without sacrificing the environment or public. We can do all of this by changing the resources we manufacture products with and by making you aware of the power of protest through purchase to ensure big business supports it. We all can simply boycott fossil fuel products. However, we must first build cost effective alternatives to compete with fossil fuels, or we will be stuck in that area that where passion isn't enough to compete with profit. Few will give up their toxic iphones or plastic bottles for change without an affordable substitute. A NEW WAY FORWARD: WILL YOU CAUSE THE LARGEST SHIFT OF WEALTH AND POWER IN HISTORY? or Do YOU want more of the same? Visit the Foundation www.bioeconomyfoundation.org Facebook: http://facebook.com/abioeconomy Twitter: http://twitter.com/abioeconomy All Copyrights reside with their respective owners. 'Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for 'fair use' for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use' Category Nonprofits & Activism
Coal, Oil and Natural Gas  "Biotic or Abiotic"  Not Fossil Fuel  -  YouTube
 
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Renewable Coal, Oil and Natural Gas? Does it matter? Well, Yeah. All three were formed many hundreds of millions of years ago before the time of the dinosaurs - hence the name fossil fuels. The age they were formed is called the Carboniferous Period. Abiotic Theory. There is an alternative theory about the formation of oil and gas deposits that could change estimates of potential future oil reserves. According to this theory, oil is not a fossil fuel at all, but was formed deep in the Earth's crust from inorganic materials. The abiogenic origin of petroleum deposits would explain some phenomena that are not currently understood, such as why petroleum deposits almost always contain biologically inert helium. Abiogenic petroleum origin is a term used to describe a number of different hypotheses which propose that petroleum and natural gas are formed by inorganic means rather than by the decomposition of organisms.
Views: 658 JCVdude
FOSSIL FUELS AND THE USES...
 
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To know more about fossil fuel ,WATCH THIS VIDEO.......
Views: 1477 Manuel Mathew John