Home
Search results “Government issuing bonds”
Fiscal Policy - Borrowing and Government Bonds
 
14:47
Fiscal Policy - Borrowing and Government Bonds - The idea of borrowing money by issuing government bonds in order to enact expansionary fiscal policy
Views: 26734 EconplusDal
Corporate Bonds
 
04:04
Build your investment knowledge about corporate bonds and why they are issued, along with the different risks and benefits that are involved with secured and unsecured corporate bonds. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 49872 Zions TV
Bonds: A more Concrete Definition and the Issuing Process
 
05:44
In this video we provide an alternative (more 'formal') bond definition as well as an overview of the bond issuing process. For more content: http://www.ecognosi.org/
Views: 1669 EcoGnosi
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
08:42
What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 495146 Khan Academy
How bonds work
 
03:36
Investing can sometimes seem like either like a gamble or very dull. At the "gambling" end of the spectrum are shares, with the possibility of swift ups in price and swift drops in price. At the other end is cash in the bank -- a predictable investment with few changes day-to-day or month-on-month. Investors looking for a middle ground and looking to diversify do have other options. They can consider bonds. Bonds are something of a mystery to many people -- perhaps because they are not often talked about. But bonds can play an important role in managing investments. They can be a half way house between the risk of shares and property and the safety of cash. How do bonds work? At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Or, more technically, it is a large loan that has been split into packages and sold to investors. Bond holders typically make money by receiving regular payments of interest (known as coupons) during the life of the loan. When the loan ends, their original investment is returned. Bonds may have lives of just a year or two or for 10, 20 or even 30 years. You can buy individual bonds or opt for units in a bond fund run by an asset manager. Like shares, bonds or bond funds can usually be sold at any time and the value of your investment may rise or fall. But bond prices usually move less than shares. That is why they are considered safer than shares but they are more risky than a bank deposit. The original investment and the coupon payments are secure for bonds, while with shares, there is no guarantee of receiving dividend payments -- or your original investment. Looking a bit more closely, there are two main types of bonds -- corporate bonds and government bonds. Corporate bonds are loans made by companies. Government bonds are loans made by governments. Corporate bonds are more risky because the company issuing the bond may go bankrupt. In bankruptcy, though, bond holders are paid before shareholders. Governments rarely go bankrupt so government bonds are safer than corporate bonds. And the lower interest rate on government bonds reflects this. Getting more technical, different types of bonds are designed to work in different financial conditions. In particular, index-linked bonds pay coupons and the original investment in a way that compensates for inflation. The can be attractive to investors who want to ensure the value of their investment does not fall if prices rise. Bonds don't have to be part of your investment portfolio. Some people are happy to invest exclusively in shares and property but if you want to spread your investment risk, if you want to diversify, remember that there is always a half way house in bonds.
Views: 87748 ING eZonomics
What are Municipal Bonds? | Fidelity
 
06:02
Learn the details behind general obligation municipal bonds – what they are, why they are created, and how they work – with this illustrated video by Fidelity. To learn more about municipal bonds, please visit https://www.fidelity.com/fixedincome-bonds/individual-bonds/municipal-bonds. To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Many people purchase municipal bonds as part of their overall investing strategy, but there’s quite a story behind how they are created, how they work, who’s involved. The municipal bond process can be a complicated one, so we’ll try to simplify it for you. Our story begins by paying a visit to Anytown, USA. Anytown is a great place to live. There’s a thriving cultural scene, good schools, and a strong business environment. It’s no wonder that many families have moved here. But, with lots of families now living in Anytown, the schools are bursting at the seams. The mayor, town council, and school district leaders all agree that a brand new school is needed, in addition to expansions to some of the existing school buildings. But, at an estimated cost of $30,000,000, how will the town pay for it? The town leaders come up with a plan to raise these funds by issuing bonds. This means that Anytown will borrow money from investors with the expectation of paying them back, with interest, over time. The people who will actually use the school building in the future will also be the folks paying for it. Anytown will use property tax revenues to repay the investors, backed by the full faith and taxing authority of the town. This is called a “general obligation municipal bond.” But, things can’t move forward just yet. Voter approval of the proposal is required. So, a bond proposal is developed and put on the ballot, as part of an election. The votes are tallied and the proposal is passed. At this point in our story, some new characters enter the scene: the underwriter, the bond counsel, and in most cases, the financial advisor. The financial advisor helps Anytown make decisions regarding the bond issue and works with the underwriter to determine pricing and distribution to investors. The underwriter acts as a liaison between the town and potential investors when bringing the bond issue to market. An underwriter can be chosen in two ways: via competitive sale or negotiated sale. The leaders of Anytown decide to go the competitive route, and put the bond issue out to bid. This is where the bond counsel, Smith & Jones Law Firm, enters the picture. Smith & Jones prepares the bond documents, including the Official Statement, and since Anytown has chosen the competitive route, a Notice of Sale. The Official Statement contains all the information a prospective investor needs in order to invest in Anytown’s bond issue. The underwriter will review the Official Statement and decide whether to bid on the bond. The bond counsel also writes the legal opinion, which provides justification and law for the tax exempt status of the issue and ensures that the bonds are valid and binding obligations for Anytown. The firm does not comment on the investment merit of the bond issue. Now that the legal opinion is in place, the Notice of Sale can be completed and posted. ABC Investment Bank sees the ad and is interested in underwriting it, with the ultimate goal of buying the muni bond issue from Anytown, and reselling it to investors. Before submitting a bid, however, they would like to invite other investment banks to participate with them, so they decide to form a syndicate and act as the syndicate manager. Forming a syndicate will allow the bank to share the marketing and distribution duties, as well as some of the financial risk of underwriting the bond issue. Two banks, JKL and XYZ, agree to join ABC Syndicate and they submit a bid. Back at Anytown town hall, the bid is reviewed, along with several others up for consideration. After much deliberation, the bond issue is awarded to the syndicate formed by ABC Investment Bank because they turned in the lowest borrowing cost. The syndicate goes to work as the underwriter, reaching out to individual and institutional investors to determine their interest in purchasing the bonds [...] Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, RI 02917 608004.3.0
Views: 63585 Fidelity Investments
MMT: Why Do Governments That Issue Their Own Currency Bother To Sell Bonds?
 
04:36
Professor L. Randall Wray on why a government with a sovereign non-convertible currency might choose to issue bonds. Bond sales are not a borrowing operation for the state. Logically, since the dollar is a liability (an IOU) of the government, it's impossible for the government to borrow back dollars, just like it would be impossible for you to borrow back your own student loan debt, or for Pizza Hut to borrow back its own coupons. Rather, a bond sale is just a swap of one government-issued asset (cash) for another (bonds) which pays interest. It doesn't change the amount of assets or liabilities out there, only the form. A government that issues its own non-convertible currency does not need to sell bonds in order to spend. This is because it issues the currency every time it spends (and destroys the currency when it taxes). The main reason such a government might want to sell bonds is because of its effects on interest rates. If the government is running a deficit, then it is creating more money than it destroys through taxes. This means that the banking system will have excess reserves, more than they need to settle inter-bank payments and meet reserve requirements. Normally, banks don't want to hold excess reserves, they'd rather purchase some other higher-interest-earning asset. So they will take the excess reserves and try and loan them to other banks (note that they cannot loan them to the public. That would be impossible, because the public does not have accounts at the Fed, and reserves only exist in accounts at the Fed). The market for interbank loans is called the "Federal Funds market" in the United States. The system-wide position of excess reserves, that everybody is trying to get rid of but nobody wants, will drive interest rates down, potentially to zero. If the central bank doesn't want to have a zero overnight interest rate, if they prefer a higher rate target, then they need to drain the excess reserves, and the government does this by selling bonds and destroying the reserves. (And it's identical whether it's the Fed or the Treasury doing the selling.) The government does not need to do this. They could simply leave excess reserves in the banking system, and then have a permanent zero overnight interest rate. Or, they could stop selling bonds, but raise the interest rate by directly paying interest on reserves, because no bank will lend out reserves for less interest than they could get by simply leaving them parked in its Fed account. So, bond sales are actually part of a monetary policy operation to sustain an interest rate higher than the interest rate paid on bank reserves (which is usually zero). A government might also offer bonds to its citizens if it would like to give them risk-free interest income. (For a government that manages its exchange rate, such as through a gold standard, the government may be forced to sell bonds in order to maintain the exchange rate peg. This is because savings held in currency is eligible to be converted to the gold or pegged currency, while savings held in bonds is not. So the government can sell bonds to take pressure off of its exchange rate, and prevent it from running out of foreign currency (or gold) reserves.) See the whole lecture here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i35uBVeNp6c Like Deficit Owls on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeficitOwls/
Views: 6128 Deficit Owls
MMT: Sovereign Currency Governments Should Stop Selling Bonds
 
05:22
Professor L. Randall Wray discussing how bond sales work with a currency-issuing government with a floating exchange rate. Because the government can issue currency (and indeed must every time it spends) there is no need to issue debt in order to spend. What the debt accomplishes is to remove the excess reserves in the banking system that are created by government deficits (government spending creates reserves, taxes destroy reserves), which raises the interest rate. With excess reserves in the system, banks are not able to get rid of them through lending, so overnight interest rates will fall to zero. Selling bonds drains the excess reserves, causing interest rates to rise above zero. So, the currency issuing government (with a floating exchange rate) doesn't need to sell bonds, and can control the interest rate. The position held by most adherents of Modern Money Theory is that the government should just stop selling bonds, and let interest rates fall to zero as the excess reserves accumulated. Part of the reason is that adjusting the interest rate is ineffective as a tool to stabilize the economy (see more on that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E464oOQ6Tw&list=PLZJAgo9FgHWaMs-WzbMAUw91u5pjGaR59&index=10) and also partly because keeping the interest rates above zero is a subsidy for the top 1%. Since most of the government bonds are held by the wealthy, and most of the lending in the economy is done by the wealthy, the government keeping interest rates above zero enriches the already-wealthy. Selling bonds is completely necessary on a fixed exchange rate, in order to lock up your excess currency to minimize your citizens' demands to convert to the reserve currency. But on a floating exchange rate, this is not a problem, because the government doesn't need to hold on to the foreign currency, because they have no peg to maintain. See the whole video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zEbo8PIPSc Follow Deficit Owls on Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/DeficitOwls/ https://twitter.com/DeficitOwls
Views: 3143 Deficit Owls
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
13:16
Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 509529 Khan Academy
Issuing state bonds
 
01:38
Italy, Spain and even Greece have all managed to raise fresh funds at lower borrowing rates in spite of ratings agency Moody's sovereign debt downgrades and Athens' grim battle to avert bankruptcy and eviction from the eurozone.
Views: 311 AFP news agency
Amortizing a Bond Premium
 
15:25
This video explains how to account for bonds issued at a premium. An example is provided to illustrate how to calculate the bond proceeds, premium, interest expense, amortization of the bond premium, and the carrying value of the bonds. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 61175 Edspira
Credit risk in bonds
 
06:27
Credit risk in bonds I've tried to emphasize interest rate risk when you invest in bonds because many people don't understand this risk even though it's probably the biggest risk facing today's bond investor. But almost everyone understands credit risk. Credit risk is the risk that the issuing company or government can't meet the promised interest or principal payments. US Treasuries face least credit risk In this case, US Treasury bonds and mortgage securities called Ginnie Maes offer the highest credit ratings. These securities are backed by the "full faith and credit" of the US government. Government agency securities After US Treasuries and Ginnie Maes come debt issued by quasi-governmental agencies like the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation also known as Freddie Mac. Although debt issued by these corporations does not carry the explicit backing of the US government, most bond traders believe the government will back up the companies if their bankruptcy is threatened. Blue chip corporations Next comes the debt of large, blue chip corporations like General Electric. This debt is normally called investment grade debt. Debt issued by large corporations is normally rated by independent companies like Moody's, and Standard & Poors. These companies do extensive research into the issuing company's ability to repay their bonds. Hierarchy of claims Before we jump further down into junk bonds, we should spend a little time talking about the hierarchy of claims on a company's assets and see what happens if a company files or is forced into bankruptcy. According to the US Constitution, bankruptcy proceedings are handled by federal law. US bankruptcy laws were rewritten in 1978 to change the traditional pecking order of those who can make claims against a bankrupt company. Lawyers and the IRS are highest Highest on the pecking order is the bankruptcy lawyers. Lawyers write the laws, so it shouldn't be too surprising that they want to get paid for their efforts as they try to dole out the company's assets. Next comes the IRS, then the firm's employees and their pension funds. After them come the company's secured creditors. These creditors have loaned the company money, but the loan is secured by a mortgage on a piece of real property like a building or heavy equipment. Most blue chip debt is unsecured Although secured debt is common for smaller companies, the majority of blue chip corporate debt is unsecured debentures. Here the lender only has the promise that the firm will honor its debt. This is similar to unsecured credit card debt that most consumers carry. However, there are several levels of unsecured debt. So-called senior debt holders are paid off before junior or subordinated debt holders. Unsecured creditors also include the suppliers who provided the company with merchandise. After the junior debt holders come the preferred stockholders. Finally, if there's any money left, the common stockholders receive compensation for their ownership in the company. Chapter 11 and 7 bankruptcy There are two forms of corporate bankruptcy, named for sections in the federal law which govern their policies. One is Chapter 11, and this type appears in the news most often. In this case, the company continues operation, but it receives a temporary reprieve from its creditors while it works out a debt repayment plan. The second is Chapter 7. In this more extreme case, the company is liquidated and assets are sold off to satisfy creditors. A company can be forced into bankruptcy by its creditors if the company fails to meet its obligations. The company also voluntarily can choose to file for bankruptcy. Once in bankruptcy, a federal court plays a major role in the handling of claims. Typical bankruptcy reorganization Although it's difficult to generalize about bankruptcy proceedings, if a company files for bankruptcy, and then later re-emerges as an operating company, the old creditors and shareholders have their claims shifted down one level in the claims hierarchy. For example, the old senior debt holders become junior creditors, the old junior debt holders become stockholders and the old stockholders lose everything or perhaps get some equity warrants. Ratio analysis for credit worthiness To avoid the unpleasantness of bankruptcy, bond investors and independent rating agencies analyze a company's financial condition. Typically, investors look at various ratios to see if the firm is a good risk. One of the most common ratios is the firm's current ratio. Current ratio Times interest earned ratio Debt to equity ratio Copyright 1997 by David Luhman
Views: 962 MoneyHop.com
Intro to the Bond Market
 
06:24
Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
International bonds | Aiden Wang | TEDxMSU
 
14:15
Michigan State University is home to one of the largest international student populations in the nation. With his unique perspective as a Chinese international student, Aiden Wang breaks down misconceptions and stereotypes that surround some students' situations. Aiden Wang is a student at Michigan State University passionate about fostering understanding between domestic and international citizens. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 2268 TEDx Talks
After 10-Issuing Govt. Bonds 

정부채의 발행
 
04:41
Building National Happiness: Social Welfare Policy The new government takes office in just three days, and we continue our look at the challenges that President-elect Park Geun-hye′s administration will face. This week, we are joined by Lee Hye-hoon, Supreme Council member of the Saenuri Party to discuss what the nation can expect in terms of welfare reform. 국민행복시대-복지정책 이혜훈 새누리당 최고의원 MC와 이혜훈 위원 대한민국 새 정부 출범 D-3일! 국민행복시대를 말하는 새 정부의 과제들을 점검해본다. 이번 주 은 새누리당 <이혜훈> 최고위원을 모시고 한국의 복지정책을 논의한다.
Views: 12 ARIRANG ISSUE
What is INFLATION INDEXED BOND? What does INFLATION INDEXED BOND mean?
 
03:49
What is INFLATION INDEXED BOND? What does INFLATION INDEXED BOND mean? INFLATION INDEXED BOND meaning - INFLATION INDEXED BOND definition - INFLATION INDEXED BOND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Daily inflation-indexed bonds (also known as inflation-linked bonds or colloquially as linkers) are bonds where the principal is indexed to inflation or deflation on a daily basis in terms of the official Daily CPI or monetized daily indexed unit of account like the Unidad de Fomento in Chile and the Real Value unit of Colombia. They are thus designed to hedge the inflation risk of a bond. The first known inflation-indexed bond was issued by the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1780. The market has grown dramatically since the British government began issuing inflation-linked Gilts in 1981. As of 2008, government-issued inflation-linked bonds comprise over $1.5 trillion of the international debt market. The inflation-linked market primarily consists of sovereign bonds, with privately issued inflation-linked bonds constituting a small portion of the market. Daily inflation-indexed bonds pay a periodic coupon that is equal to the product of the daily inflation index and the nominal coupon rate. The relationship between coupon payments, breakeven daily inflation and real interest rates is given by the Fisher equation. A rise in coupon payments is a result of an increase in inflation expectations, real rates, or both. For some bonds, such as the Series I Savings Bonds (U.S.), the interest rate is adjusted according to daily inflation. For other bonds, such as in the case of TIPS, the underlying principal of the bond changes, which results in a higher interest payment when multiplied by the same rate. For example, if the annual coupon of the bond were 5% and the underlying principal of the bond were 100 units, the annual payment would be 5 units. If the inflation index increased by 10%, the principal of the bond would increase to 110 units. The coupon rate would remain at 5%, resulting in an interest payment of 110 x 5% = 5.5 units. The real yield of any bond is the annualized growth rate, less the rate of inflation over the same period. This calculation is often difficult in principle in the case of a nominal bond, because the yields of such a bond are specified for future periods in nominal terms, while the inflation over the period is an unknown rate at the time of the calculation. However, in the case of inflation-indexed bonds such as TIPS, the bond yield is specified as a rate in excess of inflation, so the real yield can be easily calculated using a standard bond calculation formula. The most liquid instruments are Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS), a type of US Treasury security, with about $500 billion in issuance. The other important inflation-linked markets are the UK Index-linked Gilts with over $300 billion outstanding and the French OATi/OAT€i market with about $200 billion outstanding. Germany, Canada, Greece, Australia, Italy, Japan, Sweden and Iceland also issue inflation-indexed bonds, as well as a number of Emerging Markets, most prominently Brazil.
Views: 2687 The Audiopedia
Key Things to Know about Fixed Income ETFs | Fidelity
 
03:56
Find out more about exchange-traded funds with us at the https://www.fidelity.com/learning-center/investment-products/etf/overview To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Fixed income can be a critical part of nearly every well-diversified portfolio. Used correctly, fixed income can add diversification and a steady source of income to any investor’s portfolio. But how do you choose the right fixed-income ETF? The key to choosing the right fixed-income ETF lies in what it actually holds. U.S. bonds or international bonds? Government securities or corporate debt? Bonds that come due in two years or 20 years? Each decision determines the level of risk you’re taking and the potential return. There are many types of risks to consider with bond investing. Let’s talk more about two in particular: Credit risk and Interest-rate risk. Determining the level of credit risk you want to assume is an important first step when choosing a fixed-income ETF. Do you want an ETF that only holds conservative bonds—like bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury? Or do you want one holding riskier corporate debt? The latter may pay you a higher interest rate, but if the company issuing the bond goes bankrupt, you’ll lose out. ETFs cover the full range of available credit. Look carefully at the credit quality composition of the ETFs underlying holdings, and don’t be lured in by promises of high yields unless you understand the risks. Bonds are funny. Intuitively, you would assume that higher interest rates are good for bondholders, as they can reinvest bond income at higher prevailing interest rates. But rising interest rates may be bad news, at least in the short term. Imagine that the government issues a 10-year bond paying an interest rate of 2%. But shortly thereafter, the U.S. Federal Reserve hikes interest rates. Now, if the government wants to issue a new 10-year bond, it has to pay 3% a year in interest. No one is going to pay the same amount for the 2% bond as the 3% bond; instead, the price of the 2% bond will have to fall to make its yield as attractive as the new, higher-yielding security. That’s how bonds work, like a seesaw: As yields rise, prices fall and vice versa. Another important measure to consider when looking at interest rate risk is duration which helps to approximate the degree of price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. The longer the duration, the more any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Conversely, the shorter the duration, the less any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Let’s review a few other considerations when looking at fixed income ETFs. First, expense ratios: Because your expected return in a bond ETF is lower than in most stock ETFs, expenses take on extra importance. Generally speaking, the lower the fees, the better. Second, tracking difference: It can be harder to run a bond index fund than an equity fund, so you may see significant variation between the fund’s performance and the index’s returns. Try to seek out funds with low levels of tracking difference, meaning they track their index well. Finally, some bonds can be illiquid. As a result, it’s extra important to look out for bond ETFs with good trading volumes and tight spreads. There are other factors to watch for too, but these are the basics. ETFs can be a great tool for accessing the bond space, but as with anything, it pays to know what you’re buying before you make the leap. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, Rhode Island, 02917 723251.2.0
Views: 53788 Fidelity Investments
Economics & Government : How Does the Government Borrow Money?
 
00:40
The government borrows money by issuing bonds that anybody can purchase, and the U.S. Treasury issues four different types of bonds. Learn about municipal bonds and their tax free interest with help from an online campaign manager in this free video on the government borrowing money. Expert: Bill Scher Contact: www.liberaloasis.com Bio: Bill Scher is the executive editor of LiberalOasis.com, and the online campaign manager at Campaign for America's Future. Filmmaker: David Pakman
Views: 1808 eHow
You Can't Have A Debt Crisis If You Issue The Currency
 
06:38
Professor L. Randall Wray explaining why government debt is not a problem for a government that issues its own floating-exchange rate currency. Because the government issues the currency, it is always capable of making its payments on time, no matter how large they are. It never has to default. Furthermore, because it is the monopoly issuer of the currency, it chooses the interest rate it pays. If it wants to raise the interest rate, it can borrow more money (sell more bonds) to raise the rate. If it wants to lower the rate, it can borrow less money, or even lend money, in order to lower the interest rate. (If it did nothing, and just deficit spends money into existence without selling bonds, then this would drive interest rates to zero, because the private sector would have more cash then it wanted and no way to get rid of it without the government taxing or borrowing it back.) What's more, paying off the debt is not likely to be inflationary, even if it is "printing money." This is because when the government buys back a bond, it has not actually given any income to anybody or made anybody richer. It just changes the form of their savings: their portfolio had bonds, now it has cash instead, but the same dollar amount. It's like swapping red dollars for blue dollars. It's not likely to cause anybody to go out and spend any money they weren't already spending, and therefore it can't lead to rising prices. Now, the story is a little different if you have a fixed exchange rate. In order to fix the exchange rate, a government buys and sells foreign currency in order to move the market price. This means they must have the foreign currency, and so much operate their economy in such a way that the foreign currency flows in, otherwise they won't be able to maintain the peg. So, anything the government can do to reduce the amount of excess cash in circulation will reduce the amount of individuals trying to buy the foreign currency from the government, which means the government will be less likely to run out. So the government's treasury MUST offer whatever interest rate is necessary for the private sector to buy all of the government's bonds, and hold them. Not so on a floating currency: the government can sell the bonds to the central bank, or just stop issuing bonds and just spend the money into existence directly. But even on a fixed exchange rate, the government always has the ABILITY to pay any amount of debt. It just might not want to because of the adverse effects on its ability to maintain the fixed exchange rate. Watch the whole video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zEbo8PIPSc Follow Deficit Owls on Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/DeficitOwls/ https://twitter.com/DeficitOwls
Views: 3685 Deficit Owls
What is GOVERNMENT BOND? What does GOVERNMENT BOND mean? GOVERNMENT BOND meaning
 
01:16
What is GOVERNMENT BOND? What does GOVERNMENT BOND mean? GOVERNMENT BOND meaning. A government bond is a bond issued by a national government, generally with a promise to pay periodic interest payments and to repay the face value on the maturity date. Government bonds are usually denominated in the country's own currency. Another term similar to government bond is "sovereign bond". Technically any bond issued by a sovereign entity is a sovereign bond but sometimes the term is used to refer to bonds issued in a currency other than the sovereign's currency. If a government or sovereign is close to default on its debt the media often refer to this as a sovereign debt crisis. The terms on which a government can sell bonds depend on how creditworthy the market considers it to be. International credit rating agencies will provide ratings for the bonds, but market participants will make up their own minds about this.
Views: 3439 The Audiopedia
What If Nobody Bought US Treasury Bonds?
 
01:06
Professor L. Randall Wray answering the question of what would happen if nobody bought US treasury bonds? Would we go bankrupt?! The answer is no. Under current law, special primary dealer banks must buy new issues of treasury bonds, and then they can either keep them, sell them to the public, or sell them to the Federal Reserve. But even if we didn't have our current institutional structure, a currency-issuing government like the United States can always sell its bonds to the central bank. (To understand why this is not inflationary, see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CO6GS13rEuE&index=7&list=PLZJAgo9FgHWaMs-WzbMAUw91u5pjGaR59) Watch the whole video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zEbo8PIPSc Follow Deficit Owls on Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/DeficitOwls/ https://twitter.com/DeficitOwls
Views: 1304 Deficit Owls
The story of Financial History(2)- Firenze and the origin of bonds
 
04:07
Provider : http://www.elkedu.co.kr Blog: http://blog.naver.com/elkedu_com If you like this video, please click YouTube Like Button and give a comment. The first general government bonds were issued in the Netherlands in 1517. Because the Netherlands did not exist at that time, the bonds issued by the city of Amsterdam are considered their predecessor which later merged into Netherlands government bonds. The average interest rate at that time fluctuated around 20%. The first ever bond issued by a national government was issued by the Bank of England in 1694 to raise money to fund a war against France. It was in the form of a tontine. The Bank of England and government bonds were introduced in England by William III of England also called William of Orange who copied the 7 Dutch Provinces approach of issuing bonds and raising government debt where he ruled as a Stadtholder to finance England's war efforts. This lecture was produced by ELK (e-learning Korea). http://www.elkedu.com The instructor is Kim Yong-Seok CPA/CFA [email protected] Book information http://book.naver.com/bookdb/book_detail.nhn?bid=10549543
Views: 426 ELKEDU
Savings Bonds: "The Egg and US" ~ 1952 Life Magazine; Financing the US Government
 
15:06
Financial Classic Films playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE7527E1C9F0B138B more at http://money.quickfound.net/ 'This part-animated, part-live-action film assures us, the American viewer, that we have confidence in the economy and that "the nation's nest egg is growing" to 235 billion dollars in savings. Even though the postwar economy is helping the individual to save money, the national debt totals 275 billion dollars which can be paid off in the most stable manner by the government borrowing from individuals. This film speaks confidently to Americans, assuming and convincing the viewer that they have faith in the American economy, and urging them to purchase U.S. Savings Bonds...' Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savings_bond#Nonmarketable_securities Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ U.S. Savings Bonds Savings bonds were created to finance World War I, and were originally called Liberty Bonds. Unlike Treasury Bonds, they are not marketable. In 2002, the Treasury Department started changing the savings bond program by lowering interest rates and closing its marketing offices. As of January 1, 2012, financial institutions no longer sell paper savings bonds... In 2002, the Department of the Treasury's Bureau of the Public Debt made savings bonds available for purchasing and redeeming online. Finally, on January 1, 2012, banks and other financial institutions terminated their sales of bonds. Currently, Americans can only buy U.S. savings bonds online at http://www.treasurydirect.gov/. General information Savings bonds come in eight denominations: $25, $50, $75, $100, $200, $500, $1,000, and $5,000. After purchase, the holder must wait at least twelve months before cashing it in, when they will receive the principal amount (the purchase price) plus some interest. The maturity periods can vary. For example, if you buy a bond with a value of $50 for $25, you'll have to wait at least 17 years to get your investment back from the government, depending on the interest rate. The longer you wait, the greater interest you earn, however savings bonds have a 30-year maximum of interest accrual. After 30 years, the bond no longer accrues interest. Savings bonds are protected because they are secured by the U.S. government. The principal and earned interest are registered with the Treasury Department, so if a bond is lost, stolen, or destroyed they can be replaced at no cost. Savings bonds can also have value as a collectible since the government stopped issuing them in paper form. Tax benefits of savings bonds Savings bond interest is tax deferred. This means that you pay tax only when the bond is cashed (or stops earning interest after 30 years). Interest is taxable by the federal government but not state or local governments. Using the money from a cashed savings bond for higher education may keep you from paying federal income tax on your interest. Current bond types There are two types of savings bonds: EE-Bonds and I-Bonds. EE-Bonds are fixed interest bonds guaranteed to double in value over 20 years. The rate is fixed upon purchase. Tax is deferred until the bond is cashed. The maximum amount that can be purchased is $10,000 per person per year in electronic form. I-Bonds have fixed and variable rate components. The fixed rate is set at the time of purchase. The variable rate is adjusted every six months based on consumer price inflation. The variable rate can be less than zero in times of deflation but the combined rate cannot be less than zero. The maximum amount that can be purchased is $10,000 per person per year in electronic form. An additional $5,000 can be purchased by using one's income tax refund on Form 1040...
Views: 792 Jeff Quitney
What Are Bonds and How Do They Work?
 
01:23
Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Bonds” Bonds are a type of loan made by a lender to a borrower. They are issued by governments, supranational organizations and companies for a predetermined period of time referred to as the 'term' after which the loan should be repaid or 'redeemed' in full. Interest is usually paid twice yearly to bondholders at a fixed rate known as the 'coupon'. Unlike bank loans, bonds are traded on recognized exchanges. Just as people need money, so do companies and governments. A company needs funds to expand into new markets, while governments need money for everything from infrastructure to social programs. The problem large organizations run into is that they typically need far more money than the average bank can provide. The solution is to raise money by issuing bonds (or other debt instruments) to a public market. Thousands of investors then each lend a portion of the capital needed. Really, a bond is nothing more than a loan for which you are the lender. The organization that sells a bond is known as the issuer. You can think of a bond as an IOU given by a borrower or the issuer to a lender the investor. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
What Are Treasury Bonds?
 
00:46
Treasury bonds are considered low definition of treasury bond (t bond) long term (maturity over 10 years) fixed interest rate debt security issued by a national (federal) government backed its ('t bonds') term, semiannual the u. Australian government bonds. You also can buy them through a bank or broker. Us treasury bonds fidelity investments. Treasury bond (t bond) investopedia. Yet to the beginning investor, every balanced portfolio has at least some allocation fixed income securities, and u. Government with very little risk of default 31 mar 2015 treasury bonds, notes and bills differ in the lengths time they are issued manner which each pays interest to investors. Treasury bills notes and bonds definition, how to buy the balance. What are treasury securities? Youtube. Treasury bond (t bond)? Youtube. Treasury bond prices and yields (video) 4 types of u. Treasury bond (t bond) investopedia a treasury is marketable, fixed interest u. Government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. What is treasury bond? Definition and meaning investor words. Treasury bonds and notes are among the most popular debt exchange traded treasury (etbs) offer a convenient readily accessible etbs quoted on australian securities (asx). Smeans any medium used for investment, such as bills, stocks or bonds 3 jan 2007 quite often, i read about using treasury securities the 'baseline' what your money can return with no risk. T bonds are issued with u. United states treasury security wikipedia. Stheir differences, how to buy them, and their the u. T bonds have the longest maturities of all government issued securities and are often referred to as long. Treasury security, you are lending 4 apr 2017 treasury bills, notes and bonds fixed income securities issued by the u. Treasury bonds are issued by the government of united states in order to pay for projects. Stheir maturities range from 10 to 30 years. We no longer sell bonds in legacy treasury direct, how to invest through the central bank of kenya ''8 mar 2015definition bond a negotiable, coupon bearing debt obligation issued by u. Treasury securities? Investing in bonds. Treasury bonds are known in the market as primarily risk free; They issued by u. Individual treasury bonds direct. These issues are offered to investors with either a 20 or 30 year term in this lesson, you'll learn about treasury bonds, which basically way for governments borrow money. Treasury securities such as bills, notes and bonds are debt obligations of the u. What are the differences between a treasury bond and what bonds? Definition & rates video lesson is (t bond)? meaning definition example u. The money paid out for a treasury bond is essentially bills are safe, market investments backed by the u. Federal government suspended issuing 30 year treasury bonds for four years from february 18, 2002 to 9, you can buy us in treasurydirect. Treasury bonds cbk central bank of kenya. Government and backed by its full faith credit, having
Views: 18 Question Tray
Introduction to Bonds (Part I)
 
06:34
Trade stocks and bonds for free for 60 days with a new account with TD Ameritrade: http://bit.ly/td-ameritrade Join us in the discussion on InformedTrades: http://www.informedtrades.com/2000151-introduction-bond-investing-terms-you-need-know-part-i.html#post2122160 1. Principal: This is the face value of the bond; the amount that the first bond buyer initially loaned to the company or government issuing the bond. This is also known as the par value. 2. Coupon Payment: This is the numeric amount of interest payments that are scheduled to the bondholder. For instance, if a bond pays an investor $3,000 twice per year, the coupon amount is $3,000. 2. Yield: The yield is the sum of coupon payments in a year divided by the amount paid for the year. For instance, if a bond buyer pays $100,000 for a bond, and the bond issues 2 coupon payments of $3,000 per year, the yield is 6% (2*3,000/100,000). This is also known as the bond equivalent year, or the annualized yield. 4. Maturity Date: The maturity date is the date that coupon payments will end, and the original principal will be repaid. For instance, if a bond with a principal of $100,000 and bi-annual coupon payments of $3,000 has a maturity date of January 1, 2040, that means the bond will no longer issue coupon payments, and will give the bondholder the $100,000 that was initially borrowed, on January 1 of 2040. 5. Call Date: If a bond has a call date(s), that means the government or corporation issuing the bond has the option of paying back the principal and ending coupon payments on the call date --- which is scheduled before the maturity date specified. For instance, if a bond with a maturity date of January 1, 2040 has a call date of January 1, 2027, that means the bond issuer can pay back the principal in 2027 and no longer make any have payment obligations related to the bond. Now that we understand the basic jargon, we are one step closer to incorporating bonds into our income investment strategy, which we'll continue to focus on in this series.
Views: 1353 InformedTrades
Finance & Investment Tips : What Are the U.S. Treasury Bonds?
 
01:12
U.S. treasury bonds are used by the government to raise finances by issuing bonds backed by the U.S. Treasury, that earn interest for a consumer. Invest in U.S. Treasury bonds and earn some income with tips from a registered financial consultant in this free video on finance and investment. Expert: Patrick Munro Contact: www.northstarnavigator.com Bio: Patrick Munro is a registered financial consultant (RFC) with outstanding sales volume of progressive financial products and solutions to the senior and boomer marketplace. Filmmaker: Reel Media LLC
Views: 716 eHow
Investing Basics: Bonds
 
03:56
Bonds are one of the most common investments, but to many investors they’re still a mystery. In this video you’ll learn the basics of bonds and how they might be used by traders looking to preserve capital and pursue extra income.
Views: 124879 TDAmeritrade
Bonds & Debentures - Explained
 
05:18
Bonds and Debentures are explained in hindi. Although a bond and a debenture work more or less the same way, there are few subtle differences. In this bonds vs debentures video, we will understand these differences on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. Bond market can give you fixed income which has much lesser risk as compared to share market. You can invest in corporate bonds & debentures, government bonds and Tax Saving Bonds. There are various types of bonds - convertible & non convertible debentures, zero coupon bonds, callable bonds, secured & unsecured debentures, redeemable a& irredeemable bonds etc. Related Videos: Shares vs Debentures (Bonds) - https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Types of Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/5YN_Uo7stms How to Invest in Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/hC9OsIzAoEk हिंदी में Bonds and Debentures के बीच तुलना। हालांकि एक bond और debenture एक ही तरह से कम या ज्यादा काम करते हैं, कुछ subtle differences हैं। इस bonds vs debentures वीडियो में, हम security, convertibility, risk etc के आधार पर इन differences को समझेंगे। Share this video: https://youtu.be/BdMg5RmMj_0 Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Finance Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g To access more learning resources on finance, check out www.assetyogi.com In this video, we have explained: What is equity financing? What is debt financing? What is an example of debt financing? What is the difference between a debenture and a bond? What are debentures in simple terms? What are bonds? What are the similarities between bonds and debentures? How do bonds work? What are debenture holders? How does a debenture work? If there is a requirement of funds in any company then there are two options. First one is equity financing and the other one is debt financing. Equity financing is a risk capital in which company dilute its shareholding. On the other hand, if the company doesn't want to dilute its shareholding then company raises debt financing. So in this video, we will understand the differences between bonds and debentures on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. A bond is a financial instrument which highlights the debt taken of the issuing body towards the holders. A debenture is an instrument used for raising long term finances. Make sure to like and share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Bonds vs Debentures"
Views: 11312 Asset Yogi
What is Government Bond? | Definition of Government Bond
 
04:02
What is Government Bond? | Definition of Government Bond: generally with a promise to pay periodic interest payments and to repay the face value on the maturity date. Government bonds are usually denominated in the country's own currency, in which case the government cannot be forced to default, although it may choose to do so. If a government is close to default on its debt the media often refer to this as a sovereign debt crisis. The terms on which a government can sell bonds depend on how creditworthy the market considers it to be. International credit rating agencies will provide ratings for the bonds, but market participants will make up their own minds about this. History: The first general government bonds were issued in the Netherlands in 1517. Because the Netherlands did not exist at that time, the bonds issued by the city of Amsterdam are considered their predecessor which later merged into Netherlands government bonds. The average interest rate at that time fluctuated around 20%. The first ever bond issued by a national government was issued by the Bank of England in 1694 to raise money to fund a war against France. It was in the form of a tontine. The Bank of England and government bonds were introduced in England by William III of England also called William of Orange who copied the 7 Dutch Provinces approach of issuing bonds and raising government debt where he ruled as a Stadtholder to finance England's war efforts. Later, governments in Europe started issuing perpetual bonds (bonds with no maturity date) to fund wars and other government spending. The use of perpetual bonds ceased in the 20th century, and currently governments issue bonds of limited term to maturity. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia, which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com
Views: 14 Free Audio Books
Bonds, notes and bills
 
06:06
So much government debt! But what's the difference between the Treasury's bills, notes and bonds? Senior Editor Paddy Hirsch explains. More coverage of the financial crisis is at marketplace.org/financialcrisis
Views: 104662 Marketplace APM
What Is A Bond? 📈 BONDS FOR BEGINNERS!
 
08:41
FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM FOR DAILY MOTIVATIONAL CONTENT ✔️ @ryanscribnerofficial _______ Ready to start investing? 🤔💸 WEBULL: "Get a FREE STOCK worth up to $1000." 💰 http://ryanoscribner.com/webull BETTERMENT: "Passive investing, they manage everything for you." 📈 http://ryanoscribner.com/betterment FUNDRISE: "Passive real estate investing, 8 to 11% returns." 🏠 http://ryanoscribner.com/fundrise M1 FINANCE: "Invest in partial shares of stocks like Amazon." 📌 http://ryanoscribner.com/m1-finance LENDING CLUB: "Become the bank and make interest on loans." 🏦 http://ryanoscribner.com/lending-club COINBASE: "Get $10 in free Bitcoin (when you fund $100)." ⭐ http://ryanoscribner.com/coinbase _______ Want more Ryan Scribner? 🙌 MY INVESTING BLOG ▶︎ https://investingsimple.blog/ FREE INVESTING COURSE ▶︎ http://ryanoscribner.com/free-course FACEBOOK GROUP FOR ENTREPRENEURS ▶︎ https://www.facebook.com/groups/164766680793265/ COURSE CREATION COMPANION ▶︎ http://ryanoscribner.com/course-creation-companion LIKE MY FACEBOOK PAGE ▶︎ https://www.facebook.com/ryanoscribner/ PASSIVE INCOME MASTERCLASS LIVE EVENTS ▶︎ http://ryanoscribner.com/passive-income _______ Premium Educational Programs 🧐 PRIVATE STOCK MARKET INVESTING SITE 📊 http://ryanoscribner.com/stock-radar STOCK MARKET INVESTING COURSE 📈 http://ryanoscribner.com/stock-market-investing-course _______ Ready to keep learning? 🤔📚 My Favorite Personal Finance Book 📘 https://amzn.to/2NiyDiz My Favorite Investing Book 📗 https://amzn.to/2KEyd7D My 2nd Favorite Investing Book 📗 https://amzn.to/2tZmxBU My Favorite Personal Development Book 📕 https://amzn.to/2KJKgRn Not a fan of reading? Join Audible and get two free audio books! ❌📚 http://ryanoscribner.com/audible _______ DISCLAIMER: I am not a financial adviser. These videos are for educational purposes only. Investing of any kind involves risk. While it is possible to minimize risk, your investments are solely your responsibility. It is imperative that you conduct your own research. I am merely sharing my opinion with no guarantee of gains or losses on investments. AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE: I am affiliated with a number of the offerings on this channel. This includes the links above under "Ready To Start Investing" as well as other influencers I bring on the channel. This also includes the use of Amazon affiliate links. (Send me something) Scribner Media LLC PO Box 641 Ballston Spa, NY 12020
Views: 35527 Ryan Scribner
What Are Treasury Bonds
 
00:45
Treasury bonds fidelity investments. Treasury bond prices and yields (video) australian government bondsaustralian bonds. Treasury bills notes and bonds definition, how to buy the balance. United states treasury security wikipedia. Treasury bonds make interest payments semi annually, and the income received is only taxed at federal level. Treasury securities? Investing in bonds. T bonds are issued with long term (maturity over 10 years) fixed interest rate debt security by a national (federal) government backed its 'full faith and credit. Individual treasury bonds rates & terms direct. Investors receive the face amount of bond at maturity treasury bonds ('t bonds') are long term, semiannual issued by u. Coupon interest payments are made every six months. Bonds and securities treasury. Treasury bonds are issued in a term of 30 years and offered multiples $100 4 apr 2017 treasury bills, notes fixed income securities by the u. You also can buy them through a bank or broker. We no longer sell bonds in legacy treasury direct, 13 jul 2015 rates & terms. The money paid out for a treasury bond is essentially bonds. What are the differences between a treasury bond and what bonds? Definition & rates video lesson definition example is (t bond)? meaning u. Treasury securities and how they work treasury bonds what are, work, to buy them. There's no such thing as a risk free investment, but if there was it'd be treasury bonds. Treasury bonds are defined as u. What is a treasury bond (t bond)? Youtube. Treasury bonds pay a fixed rate of interest each year. Stheir differences, how to buy them, and their the u. Treasury security, you are lending can buy treasury bonds from us in treasurydirect. Treasury securities such as bills, notes and bonds are debt obligations of the u. Treasury bonds cbk central bank of kenya. Sinvestors in treasury notes (which have shorter term maturities, from 1 to 10 years) and bonds maturities of up 30 receive interest payments, known 8 mar 2015treasury are a secure, medium long investment that typically offer you payments every six months throughout the bond's maturity 16 nov 2016 information dealing with purchase, redemption, replacement, forms, valuation savings securities is located on may 2011. Treasury bonds, notes and bills differ in the lengths of time they are issued manner which definition. The four types of debt are treasury bills 31 mar 2015 the federal government offers three categories fixed income securities to buying public bonds (t bonds), notes notes) and bills). Federal government suspended issuing 30 year treasury bonds for four years from february 18, 2002 to 9, treasuries are debt obligations issued and backed by the full faith credit of u. Treasury bond (t bond) investopedia. Next to treasury bills (maturity less than one year), and notes ten years) t bonds are the safest form of marketable investment u. Government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Interest is paid semi annually and taxed only
Views: 83 new sparky
A Current Guide to Municipal Bonds and Debt
 
47:30
As local governments and school districts face ever-increasing budget constraints and capital needs, learn more about municipal borrowing in this webinar recording for local governmental units. Bond attorney John Kamins presents on topics including the nuts and bolts of issuing bonds with or without voter approval, who buys bonds and how, Michigan laws controlling how municipalities and schools borrow money or refinance debt, federal tax laws on tax-exempt bonds, and major developments in federal securities laws regulating municipal financial advisors and the disclosure duties of municipal officials.
Views: 350 FosterSwift
Gov't To Issue Bonds To International Market
 
02:10
Treasury is in the process of issuing 1 billion dollars bond on the international market to enable the government support its development agenda. According to outgoing Finance Minister Njeru Githae, most of the funds will be channeled towards infrastructure development. Though the bond is well intended the timing of the issue might not be right as the country is in a transitional process with a pending electoral petition.
Views: 308 Kenya CitizenTV
10(Financial Instruments ) What are Bond's ?
 
04:06
Case C7 - What are Bonds First understand bond , debentures , stock's are all means to raise capital (money ).....stocks and debentures are issued by the corporate ----bond's are issued by the government to raise money for it 's projects, from the public Let's understand Bond further , with example Government has to buy oil from Iran ....it has to pay in dollars ----Rupee has deprecated to 62 ...so , if oil costs 80 dollars a barrel , the government has to now shelve more rupees than it had to shelve earlier ---for such expenses , say government treasury doesnt have money --- then it takes loan say 1000 Rs from publc against collaterial security by issuing oil bonds ,say 10 Bonds 100 Rs each ----simply put , it takes loan from public offering rate of interest a little better than bank (& less than debentires ) Public until the time they hold the oil bond's are entitled to get a coupon (interest ) and at the end of the term will get the principal back i.e 100 Rs ..... So , what effectively is a bond --it is debt instrument issued by the government to raise money from the public for it's projects The rate of interest in bond is lesser than a similar intrument (debenture which is issued by company for same purpose but which is without collateral security ) but is safer than a stock It is also tradeable at the secondar market ...one can sell the bonds at premium or discount because in case of bankruptcy , investors have the proportionate right to the assets held by the government as security against loan taken from public Cheers , Amlan Dutta ndian Railway Finance Corp (IRFC) will hit the market on January 6 to raise more than Rs 8660 crore through tax-free bonds.
Views: 353 Make Knowledge Free
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
03:47
Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 239318 Khan Academy
Amaravati Bonds to be released Rs 2000 crore worth bonds |  | A report
 
07:49
Amaravati Bonds | issuing bonds for construction of Amaravati | A report
Views: 17154 ETV Andhra Pradesh
Banking 12:  Treasuries (government debt)
 
11:19
Introduction to government debt and treasuries. What it means when we say that Federal Reserve Notes are issued by the Reserve bank but are an obligation of the Government. More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=JBWdbzzYbtU
Views: 118121 Khan Academy
How to Issue a Bond
 
02:06
Understand how to raise capital by issuing a bond and follow us on linkedin for more information https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/18099116/
Views: 396 lcg legal services
What is a Bond? How Do Bonds Work?
 
02:04
What is a Bond? How Do Bonds Work? - Please take a moment to Like, Subscribe, and Comment on this video! View Our Channel To See More Helpful Finance Videos - https://www.youtube.com/user/FinanceWisdomForYou stocks mutual funds investment calculator hedge fund bail bonds savings bonds bonds savings calculator how to invest in stocks index funds what is energy what is diabetes investment banking surety bond mutual fund municipal bonds trust fund bonded leather hydrogen bond investment peptide bond aladdin bail bonds what is democracy what is stress what is bluetooth what is a mutual fund what is bullying cusip how to invest money surety what is technology investments what is wifi what is bonded leather investors what is biodiversity ionic bonds treasury bonds hedge funds what is a covalent bond best mutual funds what is crm cusip lookup what is dyslexia covalent bonds what is diversity what is sharepoint what is poverty i bonds common stock what is cyberbullying what is ping hydrogen bonds bond calculator investing for beginners bond order bond definition investing for dummies best investments bearer bonds metallic bond fidelity funds exchange traded funds nonpolar covalent bond fidelity mutual funds what is accounting series ee bonds chemical bond what is copyright what is erp savings bond investment news how to invest what is obesity bonded what is communication what are bonds index fund chemical bonds phosphodiester bond savings bonds calculator bail bond war bonds junk bonds glycosidic bond stocks mutual funds investment calculator hedge fund bail bonds savings bonds bonds savings calculator how to invest in stocks index funds what is energy what is diabetes investment banking surety bond mutual fund municipal bonds trust fund bonded leather hydrogen bond investment peptide bond aladdin bail bonds what is democracy what is stress what is bluetooth what is a mutual fund what is bullying cusip how to invest money surety what is technology investments what is wifi what is bonded leather investors what is biodiversity ionic bonds treasury bonds hedge funds what is a covalent bond best mutual funds what is crm cusip lookup what is dyslexia covalent bonds what is diversity what is sharepoint what is poverty i bonds common stock what is cyberbullying what is ping hydrogen bonds bond calculator investing for beginners bond order bond definition investing for dummies best investments bearer bonds metallic bond fidelity funds exchange traded funds nonpolar covalent bond fidelity mutual funds what is accounting series ee bonds chemical bond what is copyright what is erp savings bond investment news how to invest what is obesity bonded what is communication what are bonds index fund chemical bonds phosphodiester bond savings bonds calculator bail bond war bonds junk bonds glycosidic bond What is a Bond? How Do Bonds Work? Finance Wisdom For You Finance Wisdom For You What is a Bond? How Do Bonds Work? A security representing the debt of the company or government issuing it. When a company or government issues a bond, it borrows money from the bondholders; it then uses the money to invest in its operations. In exchange, the bondholder receives the principal amount back on a maturity date stated in the indenture, which is the agreement governing a bond's terms. There are several different kinds of bonds. The most basic division is the one between corporate bonds, which are issued by private companies, and government bonds such as Treasuries or municipal bonds. Other common types include callable bonds, which allow the issuer to repay the principal prior to maturity, depriving the bondholder of future coupons, and floating rate notes, which carry an interest rate that changes from time to time according to some benchmark. Along with cash and stocks, bonds are one of the basic types of assets. Among the types of bonds available for investment are: U.S. government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, federal agency securities and foreign government bonds. The characteristics of several different types of U.S. bonds are described in the Bond Basics Glossary at the end of this section. What is a Bond? How Do Bonds Work?
What Is A Debenture Bond?
 
00:45
Convertible debentures convertible bonds or that can be converted into equity shares of the issuing company after a predetermined period time debenture is debt instrument used by companies to raise money for medium how different from bank loans, and bond? . Both corporations and governments frequently issue this type of bond to secure capital an unsecured whose holder has the claim a general creditor on all assets issuer not pledged specifically other debt. What is subordinated debenture bond? Definition and meaning. Debenture bonds are a source of capital and would appear as definition debenture bond (1) the ability for consumer to purchase product or service without paying until future date, (2) security given by 19 feb 2013 stocks both securities, but major difference between two is document that either creates debt example, not secured lien on issuer's property. What are the differences between a mortgage bond & debenture difference bonds, debentures shares budgeting money. Bonds vs debentures? What are bonds? , what debentures bonds and. Difference between bonds and debentures (with comparison chart debenture wikipedia. Why does a bond's price decrease when interest rates increase? . Debenture and a bond. What is the difference between bond, equity, share, and debenture debentures definition & example bond money zine. See more bonds fall under two categories secured and unsecured. Compare 4 aug 2015 the major difference between bonds and debentures are discussed here in tabular form. Debentures are backed only by the general creditworthiness and reputation of issuer. What is debenture bond? Definition and meaning bonds debentures slideshareaccountingcoach. Instead, they are backed by the full faith and credit of issuer, bondholders term debenture bond refers to debt issued a company that is not secured collateral. Although a debenture is bond, not all bonds are characterized as definition of subordinated bond category that have lower priority than other during liquidationDebenture and investopedia. Bonds are issued by government undertakings and a debenture is thus like certificate of loan or bond evidencing the fact that company liable to pay specified amount with interest although money raised debentures becomes part company's capital structure, it does not become share two options which you can consider as investments bonds debentures, these fixed income instruments offers good return in form discussed our section investment type overview, corporation's debt comprised bonds, other forms hybrid securities 31 mar 2014 what exactly difference between (issued company) corporate bond? What kinds available first all thing mentioned different securities;. Bond is a debt security, on which you will get certain percent as interest and after specified period the debentures are bonds that not secured by specific property or collateral. Debenture bond financial definition of debenture. Debenture and a bond debenture investopedia. A mortgage bond is a
Views: 193 new sparky
When Did They Start Issuing Series EE Savings Bonds?
 
00:45
Department of the treasury to starting jansavings bonds are an appreciation type (or they sold at face value, so you'll pay $50 for a bond what distinguishes ee savings from i bonds, tax advantages and how, by taking so, instance, last issue series e has matured in june 2010, bondholders that history 26 jan 2014 8h; Nevada marijuana dispensaries off smokin' start 32m; These 10 we're now talking about issued january 1984 earlier earning interest later this year, depending on month were. Individual before may 1995 (ee bond rates and terms)savings bonds wikipedia. Series e, series ee and savings notes issued after november 1965 will stop earning interest 30 from the e bond, that contributed billions of dollars to world war ii i bonds, bond program has a rich history changing meet united states bonds program, 50th anniversary treasury securities have stopped glossary our programs this page covers january 1980 how does figure rate for these bonds? But entirely separate independent paths, both starting on certain date $75 u. Finance ee savings bonds series bond info maturity rates calculator when to cash in. Treasury earn a fixed rate of interest starting in 2012, the treasury stopped selling paper savings bonds through financial 1 may 2017 history ee bond series issued 1, 1995 april 30, 1997, based on market yields best time to cash depends an investor's life 1980s and early 1990s have original content is broad scope does not consider your personal situation many young people get as gifts help them save for college, weddings, other this very attractive gift givers, because they cost only half their depending year issued, different rates. Savings bonds are considered one of the safest investments because they 1 overview3 general information; 4 tax benefits savings united states treasury securities government debt instruments issued by non marketable (such as bonds) to does not directly issue strips; They formed unlike series ee and i bonds, do increase in value, but pay interest every e u. Savings bonds are debt securities issued by the u. Quantity issue series ee savings bonds are sold at one half face value (a $100 bond costs $50). United states treasury security wikipediaseries ee bond investopedia. Only on series e bonds issued in 1974 and after ee bondssavings order entrytotal issue price. How to cash in series ee savings bonds 7 steps (with pictures). 30 apr 2015 they were discontinued in december 1935. How long does it take once a bond is turned in to be paid 20 oct 2014 retirement savingsthe best plans if you're leaving company start your own baker standing bakery kitchen 7 aug 2012 savings bonds are debt securities issued by the u. United states savings bonds class ee and i. Did you cash savings bonds got as a kid? Usa todayliberty national bank. Savings bonds treasury direct. After 30 years, it's time to cash bonds bought in 1986. Those issued from 1941 to november 1965 accrued interest for 40 years; december june 1980, 30 years. Why does g
Views: 14 new sparky
Who Is At Risk? Four Local Chinese Governments Release 50 Billion Bonds
 
04:32
Follow us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/cnforbiddennews Like us on FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/chinaforbiddennews The Department of Finance in Shandong Province stated 11.2 billion Yuan of local bonds will be issued on August 23. Currently, the published total of self-issued bonds from only four provinces have reached 50 billion Yuan. The form and scale of these bonds is record breaking. However, along with huge government debts, the public are concerned about who will bear the risk for the bonds. Local bonds in Shandong Province are divided into 5-year and 7-year fixed-rate varieties, with a planed amount of 5.6 billion Yuan. August 23 will see tenders released, and on the 26, it will start issuing interest bearing bonds. In addition, according to the information, a new pilot this year for self-issued bonds in Jiangsu Province has issued 15.3 billion Yuan. The amount of Guangdong Province local government bonds this year is 12.1 billion Yuan (excluding Shenzhen). This increased significantly by 40.7% compared with last year. The amount for Shanghai is 11.2 billion Yuan. reports that, only these four provinces have self-issued bonds of 49.8 billion Yuan. This is much higher than 29.8 billion Yuan last year. However, the recent rapid growth in the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) local government bonds' has gathered attention. The CCP National Audit Office (NAO)'s audit gives details of 36 local governments' debt since 2011. It indicates that up until the end of 2012, the debt for these 36 local governments amounted to 3.85 trillion Yuan. In May this year, the CCP NAO Vice General Auditor Dong Dasheng estimated that, local governments' total debt will be around 15 to 18 trillion Yuan. The former CCP Finance Minister Xiang Huaicheng said local debt is estimated to be more than 20 trillion Yuan. Foreign experts have given a number of over 40 trillion Yuan. If according to Barclays Capital estimates, it may have reached up to 50 trillion Yuan. reports that among China's "Hundred Counties", 71 issue bonds through a financing platform. In total, there were 138 bonds financing 148.38 billion Yuan. In addition, there was a total of 170.88 billion trust financing. Feng Xiangyuan, Deputy Director of Beijing Tianze Institute of Economics: "In general throughout the country, borrowing for repaying is very severe. For example, in 2010, Jiangsu Province's total debt was 12 times the local government revenue, which is very high." According to public information, many local governments have entered a debt payment period. Some local governments' debts from the financing platform is much higher than the guarantee level of their finance land revenue. If they continue to borrow, the risk will become greater and greater. However, local governments' investment plans are very unbelievable. Last July, Changsha in Hunan announced that 829.2 billion Yuan will be invested in construction and industrial projects. Last August, Guizhou Province launched a 3 trillion Yuan stimulus plan, but in 2011, their yearly fiscal revenue was only 133 billion Yuan. Changsha City's local annual fiscal revenue is only 66.8 billion Yuan. Duan Shaoyi, an economics expert, said that this is the result of local governments' spending money without public supervision, and lacking relevant legal binding. Duan Shaoyi: "Every government official wishes to spend more money. Besides, the debt from one government can be passed to the next government." Feng Xiangyuan points out that the periodical change of local governments offers the opportunities to delay debts of some investment enterprises or construction teams. Now the local governments can still rely on the bank's financial trust funds for finance, while other channels are very difficult to reach. However, Duan Xingyuan thinks that, based on the current economic situation, the CCP authority plans to use 4 trillion Yuan of investments to stimulate economic development. Well-known economist Lang Xianping recently commented in an article. In 2008, the "Four Trillion Investments" created many "Ghost Towns", such as Ordos. It created a dramatic increase in local governments' debts. At the end of last year, only 1 trillion was repaid out the 4 trillion Yuan. The commercial banks had to agree on the local governments' delay in repaying the other 3 trillion Yuan. Duan Shaoyi: "In China, as long as the CCP governs, local governments cannot become easily bankrupt. This because the state can issue bank notes, dilute the Value of currency, and cut interest to repay the debts." Duan Shaoyi further explains that to evaporate people's money is basically stealing money, which is banditry. This makes the people distrust the government, and will generate an economic bubble.
Views: 120 ChinaForbiddenNews
Prerefunded Bonds
 
05:29
This video discusses prerefunded bonds, which are a type of municipal bond that is backed by U.S. Treasury securities. The video provides a comprehensive example to illustrate how bonds become prerefunded: an issuer, wanting to take advantage of lower interest rates, refinances by issuing a second set of bonds at the lower market rate and then uses the proceeds to back the original bond issuance (which are now "prerefunded"). When the prerefunded bonds become callable, the issuer repurchases them from investors. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 2562 Edspira
How Municipal Bonds are Issued
 
06:06
There are typically multiple parties involved behind-the-scenes in the process of issuing municipal bonds. Discover who they are and their respective roles in this segment for experienced investors. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 2578 Zions TV
Govt may allow private companies infra bonds: Pranab
 
03:17
The government today said that the private sector will be allowed to raise resources by issuing long-term infrastructure bonds carrying tax benefits.
Views: 37 ET NOW
Government & Non-Profit Accounting: Accounting for General Long-Term Liabilities and Debt Services
 
01:55:41
Government & Non-Profit Accounting: Lecture 6: Accounting for General Long-Term Liabilities and Debt Services (Chapter 6) by Professor Irfan Bora In this lecture, the Professor goes over the different types of liabilities are classified as general long-term liabilities. The Professor discusses and explains how to make journal entries in the governmental activities general journal to record the issuance and repayment of general long-term debt, as well as the preparation of note disclosures for general long-term debt. Statutory debt limits are discussed, and key terms such as "debt margins" and "overlapping debts" are defined. Lastly, after defining and discussing the different types of debt service funds at a conceptual level, the steps involved in budgeting for them and journalizing transactions involving them is covered as well. ------QUICK NAVIGATION------ Long-Term Liabilities Overview 04:25 Learning Objectives 06:00 General Long-Term Liabilities 07:22 Types of General Long-Term Liabilities 10:06 Examples 11:29 Pollution Remediation Obligation 13:14 Criteria to book Pollution Remediation Obligation as liability 16:09 Accounting for General Long-Term Liabilities 15:49 Terms Used in Describing Debt Burden 17:15 Example (Overlapping Debt) 20:03 Debt Burden (Debt Limit and Debt Margin) 22:26 Example 24:50 Problem (from textbook pg. 241) 27:40 Working the problem out as a class until 30:50 Debt Burden Measures 30:51 Debt Service Funds 32:55 Serial Bonds 35:54 Term Bonds 39:08 Zero Coupon Bonds 44:12 Accounting Principles and Procedures for Debt Service Funds 45:02 Example 45:58 Financial Statements/Schedules 50:32 Debt Service Fund Example 51:34 Example (Serial Bond Debt Service Fund) 53:25 Break (talking about next exam/class) 59:27 - 1:05:45 Example (Term Bond Debt Service Fund) 1:06:40 Special Assessment (Debt Service Funds) 1:18:39 Example (Special Assessment) 1:22:48 Liabilities Arising from Capital Lease Agreements and Examples 1:27:10 Debt Refunding Transactions 1:29:39 Advance Refundings 1:36:10 Ending Questions 1:44:05 - 1:55:41 To receive additional updates regarding our library please subscribe to our mailing list using the following link: http://rbx.business.rutgers.edu/subscribe.html

Terrorism in canada essay contest
Essay on history of chemistry
Illustration essay on peer pressure
Pomarrosas jose de diego analysis essay
Use of forest essay