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Types of Financial Market Regulation
 
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Types of Financial Market Regulation. Video covering the different Types of Financial Market Regulation Instagram: @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 22354 EconplusDal
Government Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #47
 
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Today, we’re going to wrap up our discussion of economic policy by looking at government regulation. We're going to talk about the government's goals for the U.S. economy and the policies it employs to achieve those goals. Ever since the New Deal, we've seen an increased role of the government within the economy - even with the deregulation initiatives of President Carter and Reagan in the 80's. Now this is all pretty controversial and we're going to talk about it, as this is a long way from the federal government handed down by the framers of the constitution. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 194481 CrashCourse
Federal Regulation of Financial Markets
 
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Federal Regulation of Financial Markets - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-23 - Product 281958-1-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, Former Treasury Secretary John Snow, and SEC Chairman Chris Cox testified about the state of the economy, recent turmoil in the U.S. and global financial markets, and the role of federal regulators in the breakdown of the market on Wall Street. In response to sometimes partisan and pointed questioning Mr. Greenspan said that he may have been mistaken about the reliability of some financial instruments, such as insurance-like credit-default swaps, that were not yet common when he expressed his views about markets being able to police themselves. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281958-1
Views: 3382 HouseResourceOrg
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 1
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 327 BasesFoundation
Regulators of Financial Markets - FPC, PRA & FCA
 
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Regulators of Financial Markets - FPC, PRA & FCA. Video covering the Regulators of Financial Markets - FPC, PRA & FCA Instagram: @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 20283 EconplusDal
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 2
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 186 BasesFoundation
The Fed Explains Bank Supervision and Regulation
 
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Healthy banks and healthy economies go hand in hand. The latest in the Atlanta Fed’s animated video series explains how the Federal Reserve ensures banks are doing business safely and providing fair and equitable services to their communities.
Views: 24238 AtlantaFed
Market Economy: Crash Course Government and Politics #46
 
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Today, we’re going to take a look at how the government plays a role in the economy. Specifically, the way the government creates and maintains our market economic system. Now sure, the government’s role in the economy can be controversial, some may even say completely unnecessary. But there are some deficiencies in a free market, and we’re going to look at those, and the tools the government uses to combat those issues in maintaining a healthy and stable economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 283255 CrashCourse
Re-regulation Of Financial Markets Necessary
 
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US Representative Keith Ellison hosted a financial forum in Minneapolis' Powderhorn Park recreational center in the fifth congressional district. Prentiss Cox, a lawyer, spoke on the panel. Here is his opening speech.
Views: 117 Michael McIntee
Problems With Financial Market Regulation (Evaluation)
 
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Problems With Financial Market Regulation. Video covering the Problems With Financial Market Regulation Instagram: @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 15856 EconplusDal
Global financial markets and regulatory change | Christoph Ohler | TEDxFSUJena
 
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Crises trigger the adaptation processes. Crises are motherof reforms. Christoph Ohler tours us through the Financial crisis (2007- 2009) and debt crisis (2010 – 2013) and details the best way to balance public and private interests. Christoph Ohler graduated in law from the University of Bayreuth and the College of Europe in Bruges. His PhD in European law he received at the University of Bayreuth. After working as an associate in an international law firm in Frankfurt/Main he became a research assistant at the Universities of Passau, Bayreuth and Munich. Since 2006 he holds a chair in public law, European law, public international law and international economic law at the Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena. From 2008 to 2014 he was the spokesperson of the interdisciplinary graduate program „Global Financial Markets“. He publishes extensively on German and European constitutional law and the regulation of financial markets in international and European law. „Banking Supervision and Monetary Policy in EMU” is his most recent book. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 4815 TEDx Talks
Should Securities Markets Be Transparent? Financial Markets, Trading & Regulation (2009)
 
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Public securities markets are either primary or secondary markets. In the primary market, the money for the securities is received by the issuer of the securities from investors, typically in an initial public offering (IPO). In the secondary market, the securities are simply assets held by one investor selling them to another investor, with the money going from one investor to the other. An initial public offering is when a company issues public stock newly to investors, called an "IPO" for short. A company can later issue more new shares, or issue shares that have been previously registered in a shelf registration. These later new issues are also sold in the primary market, but they are not considered to be an IPO but are often called a "secondary offering". Issuers usually retain investment banks to assist them in administering the IPO, obtaining SEC (or other regulatory body) approval of the offering filing, and selling the new issue. When the investment bank buys the entire new issue from the issuer at a discount to resell it at a markup, it is called a firm commitment underwriting. However, if the investment bank considers the risk too great for an underwriting, it may only assent to a best effort agreement, where the investment bank will simply do its best to sell the new issue. For the primary market to thrive, there must be a secondary market, or aftermarket that provides liquidity for the investment security—where holders of securities can sell them to other investors for cash. Otherwise, few people would purchase primary issues, and, thus, companies and governments would be restricted in raising equity capital (money) for their operations. Organized exchanges constitute the main secondary markets. Many smaller issues and most debt securities trade in the decentralized, dealer-based over-the-counter markets. In Europe, the principal trade organization for securities dealers is the International Capital Market Association.[2] In the U.S., the principal trade organization for securities dealers is the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association,[3] which is the result of the merger of the Securities Industry Association and the Bond Market Association. The Financial Information Services Division of the Software and Information Industry Association (FISD/SIIA)[4] represents a round-table of market data industry firms, referring to them as Consumers, Exchanges, and Vendors. In India the equivalent organisation is the securities exchange board of India (SEBI). In the primary markets, securities may be offered to the public in a public offer. Alternatively, they may be offered privately to a limited number of qualified persons in a private placement. Sometimes a combination of the two is used. The distinction between the two is important to securities regulation and company law. Privately placed securities are not publicly tradable and may only be bought and sold by sophisticated qualified investors. As a result, the secondary market is not nearly as liquid as it is for public (registered) securities. Another category, sovereign bonds, is generally sold by auction to a specialized class of dealers. Securities are often listed in a stock exchange, an organized and officially recognized market on which securities can be bought and sold. Issuers may seek listings for their securities to attract investors, by ensuring there is a liquid and regulated market that investors can buy and sell securities in. Growth in informal electronic trading systems has challenged the traditional business of stock exchanges. Large volumes of securities are also bought and sold "over the counter" (OTC). OTC dealing involves buyers and sellers dealing with each other by telephone or electronically on the basis of prices that are displayed electronically, usually by commercial information vendors such as SuperDerivatives, Reuters and Bloomberg. There are also eurosecurities, which are securities that are issued outside their domestic market into more than one jurisdiction. They are generally listed on the Luxembourg Stock Exchange or admitted to listing in London. The reasons for listing eurobonds include regulatory and tax considerations, as well as the investment restrictions. London is the centre of the eurosecurities markets. There was a huge rise in the eurosecurities market in London in the early 1980s. Settlement of trades in eurosecurities is currently effected through two European computerized clearing/depositories called Euroclear (in Belgium) and Clearstream (formerly Cedelbank) in Luxembourg. The main market for Eurobonds is the EuroMTS, owned by Borsa Italiana and Euronext. There are ramp up market in Emergent countries, but it is growing slowly. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securities
Views: 2923 The Film Archives
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 3
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 184 BasesFoundation
Elizabeth Warren Explains The Effect That Deregulation Has Had On Our Financial System and Economy
 
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From Dan Rather Reports (2009) "SOLD". Rising unemployment, weak home prices and an increasing foreclosure crisis, are threatening families, cities and the entire U.S. economy. We speak to Harvard law professor, and bankruptcy specialist, Elizabeth Warren, who has studied the economy and foreclosures and their dramatic, long term effect on the middle class of the United States. Also, what happens to all those houses that are repossessed by the banks? They are often auctioned off to the highest bidder. A huge home auction in Fort Myers, Florida takes place over three days while just a few miles away families line up at a food kitchen. Learn how the great recession has created a surprising and burgeoning problem in the wealthiest nation on earth -- hunger. In this exerpt, Warren talks about "Market Regulation".
Views: 9428 Marie Marr
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 5
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 129 BasesFoundation
💱 Price System | Free Market vs. Government Intervention
 
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Price system - free market vs. government intervention. What happens when the government interferes with the price system. Effects of maximum and minimum price. Learn Austrian Economics in a fun way! LINKS SUPPORT our project: http://bit.ly/2fgJR9e Visit our website: http://econclips.com/ Like our Facebook page: http://bit.ly/1XoU4QV Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1PrEhxG ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Music on CC license: Kevin MacLeod: Home Base Groove – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Źródło: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Wykonawca: http://incompetech.com/ Kevin MacLeod: Aretes – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Źródło: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Wykonawca: http://incompetech.com/ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Econ Clips is an economic blog. Our objetive is teaching economics through easy to watch animated films. We talk about variety of subjects such as economy, finance, money, investing, monetary systems, financial markets, financial institutions, cental banks and so on. With us You can learn how to acquire wealth and make good financial decisions. How to be better at managing your personal finance. How to avoid a Ponzi Scheme and other financial frauds or fall into a credit trap. If You want to know how the economy really works, how to understand and protect yourself from inflation or economic collapse - join us on econclips.com. Learn Austrian Economics in a fun way!
Views: 8162 EconClips
What is Deregulation?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Deregulation” Cutting red tape. The process of removing legal or quasi-legal restrictions on the amount of competition, the sorts of business done, or the prices charged within a particular industry. During the last two decades of the 20th century, many governments committed to the free market pursued policies of liberalization based on substantial amounts of deregulation hand-in-hand with the privatization of industries owned by the state. The aim was to decrease the role of government in the economy and to increase competition. Even so, red tape is alive and well. In the united states, with some 60 federal agencies issuing more than 1,800 rules a year, in 1998 the code of federal regulations was more than 130,000 pages thick. However, not all regulation is necessarily bad. According to estimates by the American office of management and budget, the annual cost of these rules was $289 billion, but the annual benefits were $298 billion. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 4
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 113 BasesFoundation
The pros and cons of financial regulations
 
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Forbes Media Chairman Steve Forbes and former CFTC Commissioner Bart Chilton debate the pros and cons of financial regulations.
Views: 1217 Fox Business
What Is Meant By Financial Regulation?
 
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They protect 18 mar 2014 post crisis international financial regulation is animated by the buzzwords mandate does not make clear what meant stability Financial definition from times lexiconfinancial law and legal. What is financial stability? Georgetown law georgetown university. Uslegal, inc what is financial regulation? Definition and meaning investor words. For example, one of the duties sec is to provide learn what a financial regulator and their influence in markets trading get an introduction regulation how systems are regulated while this entry focuses on u. Financial regulations necessitate financial institutions to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines. Financial regulation is often reactive with new regulations sealing up leakages in the financial system. Financial regulation protects investors, maintain orderly markets and promote financial definition of the supervision institutions. Definition and meaning of financial regulations. Financial services regulation, it broadly reflects what such crimes as money laundering, although this crime is hard to define federal and state governments have a myriad of agencies in place that regulate oversee financial markets companies. What does systemic financial regulation mean? Global federal banking and regulations the balance. He regulatory capital is meant to be held provides improved financial outcomes for consumers, business and the community through application of bankruptcy personal property securities laws, this a summary paper international regulation, there does not appear precise definition what risk (regulatory) audits are designed assess whether operations (management, collections expenditure) government have been legally 6 feb 2017 dodd frank act followed number regulation bills passed by congress protect including sarbanes oxley in theory it generally accepted that core purpose regulators from an institutionally defined approach functionally 7 federal regulations national rules laws govern banks, investment firms insurance companies. Ft termthese rules are generally promulgated by government regulators or international groups to protect investors, maintain orderly markets and promote financial stability regulation is a form of supervision, which subjects institutions certain requirements, restrictions guidelines, aiming the integrity system supervision. What is financial regulation? Definition and meaning investorguide regulator in the cambridge english dictionary. Financial regulation definition from financial times lexiconfinancial law and legal. These agencies each have a financial regulation the oversight of money markets, brokers, advisors and banks by an organization that has officially been given authority to do so. What is dodd frank act? Definition from whatis. Memoire online financial regulations, risk management and value the fundamental principles of regulation princeton international regulation, regulatory cost audits general audit chamber. Geneva and has imp
Views: 283 tell sparky
Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 1
 
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Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 1 - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-06 - Product 281618-1-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. Experts in economics, regulation, and corporate governance testified on the causes and effects of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. Topics included excessive CEO compensation, bad judgment by executives, relaxation of regulation, easy access to credit, excessive leveraging by investment banks, and the assumption that housing values would continue to rise. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held the first in a series of oversight hearings on the regulatory mistakes and financial excesses that led to the market breakdown on Wall Street, and on the impact of the crisis on financial markets and the U.S. economy. This session focused on the causes and effects of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281618-1
Views: 8121 HouseResourceOrg
Six Arguments Against Government Regulation
 
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Government regulation is excessive, and often such regulations do more harm than good. Hey guys, Kristin Tate here with Capitalism.com to share with you six arguments against government regulation. A significant issue from this past election and elections before it has been deregulation. Some believe that our economy needs excessive, bureaucratic red tape, while others believe it to hold back the free market. Capitalism.com contributor and economics professor Tom Lehman explained why government regulation hurts business using six different arguments. Source: https://www.capitalism.com/six-arguments-government-regulations/
Views: 2188 Capitalism.com
Regulatory BODY in India (RBI , SEBI , IRDAI , PFRDA , etc) for All Govt Exams
 
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दोस्तों नोट्स और Updates के लिए Telegram पर हमें JOIN करे । https://t.me/cafofficial Regulators in India (RBI , SEBI , IRDAI , PFRDA , etc) for All Govt Exams Like Our Facebook Page : https://goo.gl/V9RrYz Join our Study Group https://goo.gl/Ygba1C Join our Twitter Handle https://goo.gl/P6vHCs Join our Gplus updates : https://goo.gl/C97U5g
Why Aren't There More Financial Market Regulations?
 
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A reader asks Veronique de Rugy: In light of the Credit Default Swap meltdown and the recent problem with JPMorgan, why shouldn't the financial markets be more tightly regulated?
Views: 186 The Daily Beast
Financial Industry Regulation: Assisting the Banking and Financial Markets - Elizabeth Warren (2009)
 
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Critics such as economist Paul Krugman and U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner have argued that the regulatory framework did not keep pace with financial innovation, such as the increasing importance of the shadow banking system, derivatives and off-balance sheet financing. A recent OECD study suggest that bank regulation based on the Basel accords encourage unconventional business practices and contributed to or even reinforced the financial crisis. In other cases, laws were changed or enforcement weakened in parts of the financial system. Key examples include: Jimmy Carter's Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 (DIDMCA) phased out a number of restrictions on banks' financial practices, broadened their lending powers, allowed credit unions and savings and loans to offer checkable deposits, and raised the deposit insurance limit from $40,000 to $100,000 (thereby potentially lessening depositor scrutiny of lenders' risk management policies.)[87] In October 1982, U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Garn--St. Germain Depository Institutions Act, which provided for adjustable-rate mortgage loans, began the process of banking deregulation,[citation needed] and contributed to the savings and loan crisis of the late 1980s/early 1990s.[88] In November 1999, U.S. President Bill Clinton signed into law the Gramm--Leach--Bliley Act, which repealed part of the Glass--Steagall Act of 1933. This repeal has been criticized for reducing the separation between commercial banks (which traditionally had fiscally conservative policies) and investment banks (which had a more risk-taking culture).[89][90] However, the vast majority of failures were at institutions that were created by Glass-Steagall.[91] In 2004, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission relaxed the net capital rule, which enabled investment banks to substantially increase the level of debt they were taking on, fueling the growth in mortgage-backed securities supporting subprime mortgages. The SEC has conceded that self-regulation of investment banks contributed to the crisis.[92][93] Financial institutions in the shadow banking system are not subject to the same regulation as depository banks, allowing them to assume additional debt obligations relative to their financial cushion or capital base.[94] This was the case despite the Long-Term Capital Management debacle in 1998, where a highly leveraged shadow institution failed with systemic implications. Regulators and accounting standard-setters allowed depository banks such as Citigroup to move significant amounts of assets and liabilities off-balance sheet into complex legal entities called structured investment vehicles, masking the weakness of the capital base of the firm or degree of leverage or risk taken. One news agency estimated that the top four U.S. banks will have to return between $500 billion and $1 trillion to their balance sheets during 2009.[95] This increased uncertainty during the crisis regarding the financial position of the major banks.[96] Off-balance sheet entities were also used by Enron as part of the scandal that brought down that company in 2001.[97] As early as 1997, Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan fought to keep the derivatives market unregulated.[98] With the advice of the President's Working Group on Financial Markets,[99] the U.S. Congress and President allowed the self-regulation of the over-the-counter derivatives market when they enacted the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000. Derivatives such as credit default swaps (CDS) can be used to hedge or speculate against particular credit risks. The volume of CDS outstanding increased 100-fold from 1998 to 2008, with estimates of the debt covered by CDS contracts, as of November 2008, ranging from US$33 to $47 trillion. Total over-the-counter (OTC) derivative notional value rose to $683 trillion by June 2008.[100] Warren Buffett famously referred to derivatives as "financial weapons of mass destruction" in early 2003.[101][102] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_crisis_of_2007%E2%80%9308
Views: 1805 The Film Archives
How Housing Policy Caused the Financial Crisis
 
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The 2008 financial crisis "proved that financial markets are not self-regulating," says political scientist Francis Fukuyama in a recent interview with the website TheBrowser: "[Peter Wallison] lays it all at the door of Fannie and Freddie and government intervention. It seems to me transparently designed to exonerate free markets...I like free markets...[but] that particular conclusion I just find astonishing." Fukuyama isn't alone in depicting Wallison as an uncomprimising ideologue who thinks government deserves all the blame. New York Times columnist Joe Nocera called Wallison's work "loony" and accused him of helping to concoct "what has since become a Republican meme." Even pro-free market economist Russ Roberts took Wallison to task for downplaying the role of investment banks in causing the crisis. So who is Peter Wallison? He's a scholar at The American Enterprise Institute and was a leading member of the 10-person Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, a government-created body charged with looking into the causes of the 2008 meltdown. After a year of hearings and deliberation, the commission produced its official report which laid most of the blame on deregulation and private sector avarice. Wallison publicly broke with the commission over the report. "Instead of pursuing a thorough study," says Wallison, "the commission's majority used its extensive statutory investigative authority to seek only the facts that supported its initial assumptions - that the crisis was caused by 'deregulation' or lax regulation, greed and recklessness on Wall Street, predatory lending in the mortgage market, unregulated derivatives, and a financial system addicted to excessive risk taking." Wallison published his version of what caused the crisis in a 93-page dissent, which argues that the meltdown was largely a consequence of government housing policy that underwrote unsustainable economic activity. He draws heavily on the research of Fannie Mae's former chief credit officer, Edward Pinto, which found that federal housing agencies drastically underreported the number of high-risk mortgages on their books. According to Wallison and Pinto, there were about 28 million high-risk mortgages in the U.S. in 2008; roughly 70 percent of those mortgages were owned by government-sponosored enterprises such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Wallison sat down with Reason Foundation's Anthony Randazzo in January to talk about the causes of the 2008 financial crisis, what to do about Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and why he's not guilty of trying to "exonerate" Wall Street banks. This interview was excerpted from a much-longer conversation, a transcript of which can be found here, here, and here. Produced, shot, and edited by Jim Epstein. About 6 minutes. Go to http://Reason.tv for downloadable versions and subscribe to Reason.tv's YouTube Channel to receive automatic updates when new material goes live.
Views: 17803 ReasonTV
Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 2
 
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Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 2 - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-06 - Product 281618-2-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. Richard Fuld, Jr., board chairman and chief executive officer of Lehman Brothers Holdings and Lehman Brothers, testified about the bankruptcy of the company. Topics included his role at Lehman Brothers, allegations of fraud, and his compensation from the company. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held the first in a series of oversight hearings on the regulatory mistakes and financial excesses that led to the market breakdown on Wall Street, and on the impact of the crisis on financial markets and the U.S. economy. This session focused on the causes and effects of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281618-2
Views: 119028 HouseResourceOrg
Best Documentary of the Housing Market Crash (of 2018?) | Inside the Meltdown | Behind the Big Short
 
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MELTDOWN - The Men Who Crashed The World - 2018 The first of a four-part investigation into a world of greed and recklessness that led to financial collapse. In the first episode of Meltdown, we hear about four men who brought down the global economy: a billionaire mortgage-seller who fooled millions; a high-rolling banker with a fatal weakness; a ferocious Wall Street predator; and the power behind the throne. The crash of September 2008 brought the largest bankruptcies in world history, pushing more than 30 million people into unemployment and bringing many countries to the edge of insolvency. Wall Street turned back the clock to 1929. But how did it all go so wrong? Lack of government regulation; easy lending in the US housing market meant anyone could qualify for a home loan with no government regulations in place. Also, London was competing with New York as the banking capital of the world. Gordon Brown, the British finance minister at the time, introduced 'light touch regulation' - giving bankers a free hand in the marketplace. All this, and with key players making the wrong financial decisions, saw the world's biggest financial collapse. Trading Strategies Live Trade Coaching Binary Options CFD's Futures Equities Commodities FX
Views: 856866 TradingCoachUK
Global Financial Meltdown - One Of The Best Financial Crisis Documentary Films
 
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Meltdown is a four-part investigation into a world of greed and recklessness that brought down the financial world. The show begins with the 2008 crash that pushed 30 million people into unemployment, brought countries to the edge of insolvency and turned the clock back to 1929. But how did it all go so wrong? Lack of government regulation; easy lending in the US housing market meant anyone could qualify for a home loan with no government regulations in place. Also, London was competing with New York as the banking capital of the world. Gordon Brown, the British finance minister at the time, introduced "light touch regulation" - giving bankers a free hand in the marketplace. Meltdown moves on to examine the epidemic of fear that caused the world's banks to stop lending and how the people began their fight back. Finally, it asks how the world can prepare for the next crisis even as it recognises that this one is far from over. We hear about the sheikh who says the crash never happened; a Wall Street king charged with fraud; a congresswoman who wants to jail the bankers; and the world leaders who want a re-think of capitalism. http://www.RebelMystic.com
Views: 1973079 Rebel Mystic
Media Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #45
 
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Today we wrap up our discussion of the media by talking about how the government interacts with and influences the content we see. Now it may be easy to assume that because we live in a free-market capitalist society, the only real regulation of the media is determined by the consumers, but this isn’t necessarily true. The government controls a number of factors including the potential for lawsuits, spectrum licensing, FCC fines, and has even tried to pass a bit of legislation. So we’ll talk about how all of these factors influence the media and end with a discussion of a pretty hotly debated topic these days - net neutrality. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 187440 CrashCourse
What Are The Regulations Of Financial Institutions?
 
00:46
The financial institution regulations are delineated by the government authorities of institutions regulation and enforcement group at skadden regularly advises on full range regulatory, legislative matters affecting banks, thrifts, securities firms, funds, nonbank lenders, insurance companies other services firms 'in law area, actions regulatory agencies frequent extensive. Ensuring division of financial institutions florida office regulation. These include commercial banks, 9 may 2013 once a non bank financial institution has been designated as sifi, very real questions arise to how best regulate these institutions regulation. Financial regulation wikipedia. It is intended for scholars taking banking law and regulatory framework similarly, many technology companies financial institutions have been working on the adoption of voluntary guidelines self regulation to promote best florida has dual oversight system, meaning that are regulated by both state federal agenciesFinancial wikipediaregulations world finance. Financial institutions and blockchain technology. Wikipedia wiki financial_regulation url? Q webcache. Capabilities the law and regulation of financial institutions get started research guides 8 role supervision federal regulations for acts & bank uganda. Financial regulation wikipedia en. In addition, congress and the state legislatures are engaged in this guide is meant to help you find laws information on regulating financial institutions; The goal provide useful (but not exhaustive) resources adverse shocks intermediaries' balance sheets can have severe economic real effects if institution affected systemically important meeting federal regulations for institutions or your industry? Csi regulatory compliance acts &. Financial regulation wikipediaregulations of financial institutions world finance. Financial institutions regulation and enforcement. Since many of the arguments that are used to justify regulation non bank financial institutions or based on a 14 jan 2011 regulatory and legal framework within which banks, as well forex bureaux operate in ghana basic goal safety soundness is protect fixed amount creditors from losses arising insolvency owing 30 jun 2015 discover specific responsibilities some major agencies oversee united states clarify certain aspects final rule limiting ability assess overdraft fees for paying atm one time debit card transactions regulations ownership linkages among institutions; 4) restrictions portfolio assets banks can hold (such requirements stability; Regulatory supervisory guidelines risk management aim provide this book explains zambian perspective. Bou has the mandate to supervise and regulate operations of financial institutions in country. Financial regulation the concise encyclopedia of economics what are some major regulatory agencies responsible for fed regulations. Why regulate banks? International competition networkregulatory framework of financial institutions a zambian perspective. Regu
Views: 229 tell sparky
Roles and Responsibilities of Inspectors General in Financial Markets Regulatory Agencies (Part 1)
 
01:06:28
Roles and Responsibilities of Inspectors General in Financial Markets Regulatory Agencies (Part 1) - House Oversight Committee - 2009-03-25 - House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. The Government Management, Organization and Procurement Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled: "Roles and Responsibilities of Inspectors General in Financial Markets Regulatory Agencies." The hearing will take place in room 2247 Rayburn House Office Building. Video provided by the U.S. House of Representatives.
Views: 14 HouseResourceOrg
Financial Market | HINDI |
 
06:32
This video by Vinay Agarwal in Hindi is on Financial Markets . It is the first video of the series on Types of Financial Markets. Classification of Financial Markets depends on type of assets like money, debt, equity, currency and commodities. It can also be classified according to types of trades - Primary and Secondary. It can also be classified on the basis of types of issuers like Government, Banks and Corporates. My channel is on Banking, Accounting and Finance Topics. Link to my channel BANKING GURU is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCERH3CVVEXcdGP044J_WuoQ My popular videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBHorvyzOlU&t=3s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wga6kv1fcPw&t=11s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Q0QoTsaqSQ&t=5s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZnJOIiP6GQ
Views: 16037 Vinay Agarwal
Financial Changes and the Emerging Markets: Challenges of Government Conference 2012
 
01:03:48
Chair: Jose Antonio Ocampo, Columbia University, former Finance Minister, Colombia Martin Cihák, lead author of Global Financial Development Report 2013, World Bank Guillermo Larrain Ríos, Chairman, Center for Regulation and Macrofinancial Stability, University of Chile
How regulations are straining financial institutions
 
04:11
Former UBS Paine Webber Chairman Joe Grano weighs in on the mortgage crisis fines issued by the U.S. government.
Views: 278 Fox Business
The market: Free, but not beyond government regulation. Gary Banks (p1)
 
31:00
Part 1 | Part 2 The past 30 years have seen a shift away from the post-war approach of governmental guidance and regulation of the economy towards an approach stressing more the...
Views: 288 The Monthly Video
Should Government Bail Out Big Banks?
 
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Should the government bail out big banks that may otherwise go bankrupt? Or should it let them go under, as it did with Lehman Brothers in 2008? Economist Nicole Gelinas, a fellow at the Manhattan Institute, has the answer, and it will have big implications for policymakers when they grapple with the next economic crisis. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: In 2008, America experienced the biggest meltdown of its financial sector since the Great Depression. The conventional wisdom is that this failure and subsequent government rescue, commonly known as "the bailout" was brought about by three decades of bank de-regulation. There were a lot of causes for the meltdown, but deregulation wasn't one of them. Ironically, it wasn't because the banks had become unmoored from government control that led them into the financial storm, it was because they had become too closely tied to government. For three decades Uncle Sam, like an enabling parent, had always "been there" when the big banks got into trouble. The shock in 2008 was that for one brief moment, Uncle Sam wasn't there. In the wee hours of September 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy. The financial industry waited for the Feds to step in and save Lehman bondholders like it saved those of Bear Stearns some months earlier. That didn't happen. Global financial markets seized up. As the Dow Jones Industrial average fell 498 points, or nearly 4.4 percent, financial institutions effectively went on strike. Banks wouldn't lend money to other banks and thus, indirectly, to the public because they had no idea which financial institution might go belly up next. The economy can withstand a stock-market crash, but a credit-market freeze -- essentially a cash freeze -- can cause a Depression, as credit underpins almost all business and personal activities. Indeed, some large companies, including General Electric, were so dependent on these short-term credit markets that they were in danger of not being able to pay their workers. The financial industry pleaded with the government to act. Later in the same day, September 15, it did. The Feds wouldn't save Lehman's but it would save AIG, the primary insurer of mortgage loans. A month later, the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), a $700 billion plan to pump taxpayer cash into America's banks and financial institutions was approved by Congress. Public officials generally agreed that the free market had failed. In November 2008, President George W. Bush came to New York to explain why he, a Republican president, had signed TARP into law. "I'm a market-oriented guy, but not when I'm faced with the prospect of a global meltdown," he said. But free-market capitalism had not melted down. Again, the problem was not that banks had been too free, but that they had grown too dependent on government over the last few decades. Here's a brief history. America's first post-Depression bailout of a big bank came in 1984 when the Republican administration of Ronald Reagan, with help from the Federal Reserve bailed out Continental Illinois, the eighth largest commercial bank in the nation. The bailout introduced the phrase "too big to fail" to the financial media's vocabulary. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/should-government-bail-out-big-banks
Views: 799067 PragerU
Financial Economics: Update on UK Financial Regulation in 2018
 
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In this video we look at examples of how the regulators in the UK have attempted to reduce the risks of financial instability causing economic damage. This includes requiring the banks to hold larger capital reserves and also subjecting commercial banks to stringent stress tests to see if they can cope with really bad economic events both in the UK and overseas.​ - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 1969 tutor2u
How Do Hedge Funds Operate? Financial Markets, Compensation, Taxes, Regulations, Risks (2008)
 
01:49:42
In June 2006, prompted by a letter from Gary J. Aguirre, the Senate Judiciary Committee began an investigation into the links between hedge funds and independent analysts. Aguirre was fired from his job with the SEC when, as lead investigator of insider trading allegations against Pequot Capital Management, he tried to interview John Mack, then being considered for chief executive officer at Morgan Stanley.[197] The Judiciary Committee and the US Senate Finance Committee issued a scathing report in 2007, which found that Aguirre had been illegally fired in reprisal[198] for his pursuit of Mack and in 2009, the SEC was forced to re-open its case against Pequot. Pequot settled with the SEC for US$28 million and Arthur J. Samberg, chief investment officer of Pequot, was barred from working as an investment advisor.[199] Pequot closed its doors under the pressure of investigations.[200] The systemic practice of hedge funds submitting periodic electronic questionnaires to stock analysts as a part of market research was reported in by The New York Times in July 2012. According to the report, one motivation for the questionnaires was to obtain subjective information not available to the public and possible early notice of trading recommendations that could produce short term market movements. According to modern portfolio theory, rational investors will seek to hold portfolios that are mean/variance efficient (that is, portfolios offer the highest level of return per unit of risk, and the lowest level of risk per unit of return). One of the attractive features of hedge funds (in particular market neutral and similar funds) is that they sometimes have a modest correlation with traditional assets such as equities. This means that hedge funds have a potentially quite valuable role in investment portfolios as diversifiers, reducing overall portfolio risk.[69] However, there are three reasons why one might not wish to allocate a high proportion of assets into hedge funds. These reasons are: Hedge funds are highly individual and it is hard to estimate the likely returns or risks; Hedge funds' low correlation with other assets tends to dissipate during stressful market events, making them much less useful for diversification than they may appear; and Hedge fund returns are reduced considerably by the high fee structures that are typically charged. Several studies have suggested that hedge funds are sufficiently diversifying to merit inclusion in investor portfolios, but this is disputed for example by Mark Kritzman[202][203] who performed a mean-variance optimization calculation on an opportunity set that consisted of a stock index fund, a bond index fund, and ten hypothetical hedge funds. The optimizer found that a mean-variance efficient portfolio did not contain any allocation to hedge funds, largely because of the impact of performance fees. To demonstrate this, Kritzman repeated the optimization using an assumption that the hedge funds incurred no performance fees. The result from this second optimization was an allocation of 74% to hedge funds. The other factor reducing the attractiveness of hedge funds in a diversified portfolio is that they tend to under-perform during equity bear markets, just when an investor needs part of their portfolio to add value.[69] For example, in January--September 2008, the Credit Suisse/Tremont Hedge Fund Index[204] was down 9.87%. According to the same index series, even "dedicated short bias" funds had a return of −6.08% during September 2008. In other words, even though low average correlations may appear to make hedge funds attractive this may not work in turbulent period, for example around the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedge_funds
Views: 24354 The Film Archives
The Finance Industry Has Captured Our Government: Glenn Greenwald on Criminal Justice (2009)
 
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Critics such as economist Paul Krugman and U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner have argued that the regulatory framework did not keep pace with financial innovation, such as the increasing importance of the shadow banking system, derivatives and off-balance sheet financing. A recent OECD study suggest that bank regulation based on the Basel accords encourage unconventional business practices and contributed to or even reinforced the financial crisis. In other cases, laws were changed or enforcement weakened in parts of the financial system. Key examples include: Jimmy Carter's Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 (DIDMCA) phased out a number of restrictions on banks' financial practices, broadened their lending powers, allowed credit unions and savings and loans to offer checkable deposits, and raised the deposit insurance limit from $40,000 to $100,000 (thereby potentially lessening depositor scrutiny of lenders' risk management policies.) In October 1982, U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Garn--St. Germain Depository Institutions Act, which provided for adjustable-rate mortgage loans, began the process of banking deregulation, and contributed to the savings and loan crisis of the late 1980s/early 1990s. In November 1999, U.S. President Bill Clinton signed into law the Gramm--Leach--Bliley Act, which repealed part of the Glass--Steagall Act of 1933. This repeal has been criticized for reducing the separation between commercial banks (which traditionally had fiscally conservative policies) and investment banks (which had a more risk-taking culture). However, the vast majority of failures were at institutions that were created by Glass-Steagall. In 2004, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission relaxed the net capital rule, which enabled investment banks to substantially increase the level of debt they were taking on, fueling the growth in mortgage-backed securities supporting subprime mortgages. The SEC has conceded that self-regulation of investment banks contributed to the crisis. Financial institutions in the shadow banking system are not subject to the same regulation as depository banks, allowing them to assume additional debt obligations relative to their financial cushion or capital base. This was the case despite the Long-Term Capital Management debacle in 1998, where a highly leveraged shadow institution failed with systemic implications. Regulators and accounting standard-setters allowed depository banks such as Citigroup to move significant amounts of assets and liabilities off-balance sheet into complex legal entities called structured investment vehicles, masking the weakness of the capital base of the firm or degree of leverage or risk taken. One news agency estimated that the top four U.S. banks will have to return between $500 billion and $1 trillion to their balance sheets during 2009. This increased uncertainty during the crisis regarding the financial position of the major banks.[96] Off-balance sheet entities were also used by Enron as part of the scandal that brought down that company in 2001. As early as 1997, Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan fought to keep the derivatives market unregulated. With the advice of the President's Working Group on Financial Markets, the U.S. Congress and President allowed the self-regulation of the over-the-counter derivatives market when they enacted the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000. Derivatives such as credit default swaps (CDS) can be used to hedge or speculate against particular credit risks. The volume of CDS outstanding increased 100-fold from 1998 to 2008, with estimates of the debt covered by CDS contracts, as of November 2008, ranging from US$33 to $47 trillion. Total over-the-counter (OTC) derivative notional value rose to $683 trillion by June 2008. Warren Buffett famously referred to derivatives as "financial weapons of mass destruction" in early 2003. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_crisis_of_2007%E2%80%932009
Views: 5458 The Film Archives
American Finance: Banking, Financial Markets, Money and Stocks (2014)
 
27:31
Legislation passed by the federal government during the 1980s, such as the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 and the Garn–St. Germain Depository Institutions Act of 1982, reduced the distinctions between banks and other financial institutions in the United States. This legislation is frequently referred to as "deregulation," and it is often blamed for the failure of over 500 savings and loan associations between 1980 and 1988, and the subsequent failure of the Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Corporation (FSLIC) whose obligations were assumed by the FDIC in 1989. However, some critics of this viewpoint, particularly libertarians, have pointed-out that the federal government's attempts at deregulation granted easy credit to federally insured financial institutions, encouraging them to overextend themselves and (thus) fail. The savings and loan crisis of the 1980s and 1990s was the failure of 747 of the 3,234 savings and loan associations in the United States. "As of December 31, 1995, RTC estimated that the total cost for resolving the 747 failed institutions was $87.9 billion." The remainder of the bailout was paid for by charges on savings and loan accounts—which contributed to the large budget deficits of the early 1990s.[55] The concomitant slowdown in the finance industry and the real estate market may have been a contributing cause of the 1990–1991 economic recession. Between 1986 and 1991, the number of new homes constructed per year dropped from 1.8 million to 1 million, which was at the time the lowest rate since World War II. Until 1989, national banks (those with national charters) were required to participate in the FDIC, while state banks either were required to obtain FDIC insurance by state law or could join voluntarily (usually in an attempt to bolster their appearance of solvency). After enactment of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1989 (FDICIA), all commercial banks that accepted deposits were required to obtain FDIC insurance and to have a primary federal regulator (the Fed for state banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System, the FDIC for "nonmember" state banks, and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency for all National Banks). Note: Federal credit unions are regulated by National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). Savings & Loan Associations (S&L) and Federal savings banks (FSB) are regulated by the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS). The Riegle-Neal Interstate Banking and Branching Efficiency Act of 1994 amended the laws governing federally chartered banks in order to restore the laws' competitiveness with the recently relaxed laws governing state-chartered banks. The late-2000s financial crisis is considered by many economists to be the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.[66] It was triggered by a liquidity shortfall in the United States banking system[67] and has resulted in the collapse of large financial institutions, the bailout of banks by national governments, and downturns in stock markets around the world. In many areas, the housing market has also suffered, resulting in numerous evictions, foreclosures and prolonged vacancies. It contributed to the failure of key businesses, declines in consumer wealth estimated in the trillions of U.S. dollars, and a significant decline in economic activity, leading to a severe global economic recession in 2008.[68] The collapse of the U.S. housing bubble, which peaked in 2006, caused the values of securities tied to U.S. real estate pricing to plummet, damaging financial institutions globally.[69] Questions regarding bank solvency, declines in credit availability and damaged investor confidence had an impact on global stock markets, where securities suffered large losses during 2008 and early 2009. Economies worldwide slowed during this period, as credit tightened and international trade declined. Critics argued that credit rating agencies and investors failed to accurately price the risk involved with mortgage-related financial products, and that governments did not adjust their regulatory practices to address 21st-century financial markets. Governments and central banks responded with unprecedented fiscal stimulus, monetary policy expansion and institutional bailouts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banking_in_the_United_States
Views: 1039 Way Back
What is BANK REGULATION? What does BANK REGULATION mean? BANK REGULATION meaning & explanation
 
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What is BANK REGULATION? What does BANK REGULATION mean? BANK REGULATION meaning - BANK REGULATION definition - BANK REGULATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Bank regulation is a form of government regulation which subjects banks to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines, designed to create market transparency between banking institutions and the individuals and corporations with whom they conduct business, among other things. Given the interconnectedness of the banking industry and the reliance that the national (and global) economy hold on banks, it is important for regulatory agencies to maintain control over the standardized practices of these institutions. Supporters of such regulation often base their arguments on the "too big to fail" notion. This holds that many financial institutions (particularly investment banks with a commercial arm) hold too much control over the economy to fail without enormous consequences. This is the premise for government bailouts, in which government financial assistance is provided to banks or other financial institutions who appear to be on the brink of collapse. The belief is that without this aid, the crippled banks would not only become bankrupt, but would create rippling effects throughout the economy leading to systemic failure.
Views: 798 The Audiopedia
False: Deregulation in financial markets caused the financial crisis
 
05:42
Follow Liz on Twitter: @Liz_Wheeler Facebook: www.facebook.com/TippingPointonOAN Facebook: www.facebook.com/OfficialLizWheeler Instagram: @Liz_OANN
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1874870 TEDx Talks
What is REGULATED MARKET? What does REGULATED MARKET mean? REGULATED MARKET meaning
 
01:19
What is REGULATED MARKET? What does REGULATED MARKET mean? REGULATED MARKET meaning - REGULATED MARKET definition - REGULATED MARKET explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A regulated market (RM) or controlled market is a market where the government controls the forces of supply and demand, such as who is allowed to enter the market and/or what prices may be charged. It is common for some markets to be regulated under the claim that they are natural monopolies. For example, telecommunications, water, gas or electricity supply. Often, regulated markets are established during the partial privatisation of government controlled utility assets. A variety of forms of regulations exist in a regulated market. These include controls, oversights, anti-discrimination, environmental protection, taxation and labor laws. In a regulated market, the government regulatory agency may legislate regulations that privilege special interests, known as regulatory capture.
Views: 1138 The Audiopedia
Handeling the Cryptocurrency Market Crash/Dip - Government Regulation
 
11:24
There is no doubt about it, market dips and crashes like this are difficult to deal with. Whether it is Stocks, Bonds, Cryptocurrency times like these are difficult learning experiences to endure. Look for the bright side and realize everything in life will end up working out for the best. No matter what happens with this market.
Views: 37208 Altcoin Buzz
Financial Market Regulation Conference
 
08:52
Ambassador Eacho opened the one-day conference on financial market regulations in the U.S. and the EU. Mr. Baird Webel, Specialist in Financial Economics with the Congressional Research Service gave the keynote speech at the conference that convened members of the EU Parliament, EU Commission representatives, Austrian banking officials, academia, policy makers and the media.
Views: 360 USEmbassyVienna
AIG Bailout Oversight Hearing, Panel 1
 
02:36:30
AIG Bailout Oversight Hearing, Panel 1 - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-07 - Product 281644-1-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held the second in a series of oversight hearings on the regulatory mistakes and financial excesses that led to the market breakdown on Wall Street, and on the impact of the crisis on financial markets and the U.S. economy. This session focused on the causes and effects of the government bailout of American International Group (AIG). In the first panel witnesses testified that deregulation in 1999 and 2000 of financial markets and inadequate disclosure by top AIG officials contributed to the collapse of major firms. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281644-1
Views: 16553 HouseResourceOrg
Will Government Regulation Pop the Crypto Bubble?
 
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Government Regulators are talking more and more about Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, especially as the overall crypto market capitalization has grown from under $100 billion to over $600 billion in the past year. Many people talk about the "crypto bubble popping", but to be honest, I think the most worrisome thing is excessive government regulation, which will in turn, negatively effect the crypto markets. Let's talk today about the recent news from South Korea, as well as comments from the United States Treasury Secretary, Steven Mnuchin, regarding Bitcoin and crypto, and what the long-term risks might be. Article from Bloomberg and source from video: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-01-12/mnuchin-warns-against-bitcoin-becoming-next-swiss-bank-account Buy Bitcoin, Ethereum and Litecoin on CoinBase and get $10 worth free: https://cryptobobby.com/coinbase Buy and Trade altcoins on Binance - https://cryptobobby.com/binance Secure your Crypto with a Ledger Nano S: Amazon (faster shipping): https://cryptobobby.com/ledger-amazon Ledger (slower shipping, but cheaper): https://cryptobobby.com/ledger Get a Free Trial of Coinigy (the trading/charting software I use): https://cryptobobby.com/coinigy Follow me on Steemit: https://steemit.com/@cryptobobby Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/crypto_bobby Join the Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/140921189836895/ Portfolio Tracking: Blockfolio - https://www.blockfolio.com/ CoinTracking.info - https://cryptobobby.com/cointracking Bitcoin.tax - https://cryptobobby.com/bitcointax *Some of these links may be affiliate links, meaning if you click and purchase something, I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. I only recommend companies and products I personally use, and any commissions help to pay for content creation. Thanks! * ** This is not financial advice and these are simply my own opinions, as such, this should not be treated as explicit financial, trading or otherwise investment advice. This is not explicit advice to buy these cryptos, do you own research.**
Views: 22023 Crypto Bobby
US to overhaul banking regulations
 
02:00
The United States government is working to introduce laws that tighten consumer protection and control of financial markets to prevent another global collapse.

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