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Government Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #47
 
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Today, we’re going to wrap up our discussion of economic policy by looking at government regulation. We're going to talk about the government's goals for the U.S. economy and the policies it employs to achieve those goals. Ever since the New Deal, we've seen an increased role of the government within the economy - even with the deregulation initiatives of President Carter and Reagan in the 80's. Now this is all pretty controversial and we're going to talk about it, as this is a long way from the federal government handed down by the framers of the constitution. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 199531 CrashCourse
Regulators of Financial Markets - FPC, PRA & FCA
 
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Regulators of Financial Markets - FPC, PRA & FCA. Video covering the Regulators of Financial Markets - FPC, PRA & FCA Instagram: @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 21764 EconplusDal
Types of Financial Market Regulation
 
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Types of Financial Market Regulation. Video covering the different Types of Financial Market Regulation Instagram: @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 23126 EconplusDal
Federal Regulation of Financial Markets
 
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Federal Regulation of Financial Markets - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-23 - Product 281958-1-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, Former Treasury Secretary John Snow, and SEC Chairman Chris Cox testified about the state of the economy, recent turmoil in the U.S. and global financial markets, and the role of federal regulators in the breakdown of the market on Wall Street. In response to sometimes partisan and pointed questioning Mr. Greenspan said that he may have been mistaken about the reliability of some financial instruments, such as insurance-like credit-default swaps, that were not yet common when he expressed his views about markets being able to police themselves. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281958-1
Views: 3418 HouseResourceOrg
The Fed Explains Bank Supervision and Regulation
 
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Healthy banks and healthy economies go hand in hand. The latest in the Atlanta Fed’s animated video series explains how the Federal Reserve ensures banks are doing business safely and providing fair and equitable services to their communities.
Views: 25567 AtlantaFed
Global financial markets and regulatory change | Christoph Ohler | TEDxFSUJena
 
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Crises trigger the adaptation processes. Crises are motherof reforms. Christoph Ohler tours us through the Financial crisis (2007- 2009) and debt crisis (2010 – 2013) and details the best way to balance public and private interests. Christoph Ohler graduated in law from the University of Bayreuth and the College of Europe in Bruges. His PhD in European law he received at the University of Bayreuth. After working as an associate in an international law firm in Frankfurt/Main he became a research assistant at the Universities of Passau, Bayreuth and Munich. Since 2006 he holds a chair in public law, European law, public international law and international economic law at the Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena. From 2008 to 2014 he was the spokesperson of the interdisciplinary graduate program „Global Financial Markets“. He publishes extensively on German and European constitutional law and the regulation of financial markets in international and European law. „Banking Supervision and Monetary Policy in EMU” is his most recent book. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 5013 TEDx Talks
The pros and cons of financial regulations
 
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Forbes Media Chairman Steve Forbes and former CFTC Commissioner Bart Chilton debate the pros and cons of financial regulations.
Views: 1346 Fox Business
Financial Regulation in the UK
 
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​This revision video looks at the tripartite system of financial regulation in the UK
Views: 10533 tutor2u
💱 Price System | Free Market vs. Government Intervention
 
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Price system - free market vs. government intervention. What happens when the government interferes with the price system. Effects of maximum and minimum price. Learn Austrian Economics in a fun way! LINKS SUPPORT our project: http://bit.ly/2fgJR9e Visit our website: http://econclips.com/ Like our Facebook page: http://bit.ly/1XoU4QV Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/1PrEhxG ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Music on CC license: Kevin MacLeod: Home Base Groove – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Źródło: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Wykonawca: http://incompetech.com/ Kevin MacLeod: Aretes – na licencji Creative Commons Attribution (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Źródło: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Wykonawca: http://incompetech.com/ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Econ Clips is an economic blog. Our objetive is teaching economics through easy to watch animated films. We talk about variety of subjects such as economy, finance, money, investing, monetary systems, financial markets, financial institutions, cental banks and so on. With us You can learn how to acquire wealth and make good financial decisions. How to be better at managing your personal finance. How to avoid a Ponzi Scheme and other financial frauds or fall into a credit trap. If You want to know how the economy really works, how to understand and protect yourself from inflation or economic collapse - join us on econclips.com. Learn Austrian Economics in a fun way!
Views: 9537 EconClips
The market: Free, but not beyond government regulation. Gary Banks (p1)
 
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Part 1 | Part 2 The past 30 years have seen a shift away from the post-war approach of governmental guidance and regulation of the economy towards an approach stressing more the...
Views: 290 The Monthly Video
Market Economy: Crash Course Government and Politics #46
 
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Today, we’re going to take a look at how the government plays a role in the economy. Specifically, the way the government creates and maintains our market economic system. Now sure, the government’s role in the economy can be controversial, some may even say completely unnecessary. But there are some deficiencies in a free market, and we’re going to look at those, and the tools the government uses to combat those issues in maintaining a healthy and stable economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 295574 CrashCourse
Six Arguments Against Government Regulation
 
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Government regulation is excessive, and often such regulations do more harm than good. Hey guys, Kristin Tate here with Capitalism.com to share with you six arguments against government regulation. A significant issue from this past election and elections before it has been deregulation. Some believe that our economy needs excessive, bureaucratic red tape, while others believe it to hold back the free market. Capitalism.com contributor and economics professor Tom Lehman explained why government regulation hurts business using six different arguments. Source: https://www.capitalism.com/six-arguments-government-regulations/
Views: 2554 Capitalism.com
Financial Markets and Institutions - Lecture 02
 
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payable, due, asset classes, stocks, bonds, real estate, currency, commodities, gain, capital gain, realized gain, dividend, coupon, interest, rent, commission, broker, lease, lease rate, derivatives, financial derivatives, exchange, organized exchange, financial exchange, OTC, over-the-counter, commercial paper, fed funds, repo, repurchase agreement, treasury bill, negotiable CD, negotiable, acceptance, common stock, preferred stock, mortgage, mortgage loan, mortgage bond, corporate bond, government bond, municipal bond, regulation, regulatory agency, appreciate, appreciation, depreciate, depreciation, investment period, investment horizon, risk, diversification, hedging,
Views: 19913 Krassimir Petrov
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 1
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 327 BasesFoundation
Financial Economics: Update on UK Financial Regulation in 2018
 
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In this video we look at examples of how the regulators in the UK have attempted to reduce the risks of financial instability causing economic damage. This includes requiring the banks to hold larger capital reserves and also subjecting commercial banks to stringent stress tests to see if they can cope with really bad economic events both in the UK and overseas.​ - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 2282 tutor2u
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 2
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 186 BasesFoundation
ECONOMIC REGULATION
 
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In the next two video-lectures, you will learn about some of the different ways that government can promote competition and limit market power. We consider two broad types of policy. In the first video lecture we consider regulatory policy, in which the government sets the firm's price at a prescribed level and limits entry. In the second video we consider antitrust policy, which is concerned with preventing anticompetitive practices like price fixing and with limiting firms’ market power by preventing mergers or breaking up existing firms. We also will talk about the limits and difficulties of government intervention. The government has sometimes stepped in and regulated firms even when a clear indication of anticompetitive behavior is lacking. In fact, because government agencies are susceptible to external influences, sometimes the regulators may end up limiting competition through their interventions. The ability to understand and appreciate the problems associated with both market failure and government failure is an important skill for an economist to possess.
Views: 2047 Thang Nguyen Ngoc
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 3
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 184 BasesFoundation
Regulation in Financial Markets - Part 1
 
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Regulation in Financial Markets כנס זה, בהשתתפות בכירי החוקרים בתחום בעולם ובישראל, ידון ברגולציה של שווקים פיננסיים על רקע לקחי המשבר הפיננסי העולמי. מטרת הכנס היא לקיים דיון משותף לאנשי אקדמיה, רגולטורים, גורמי ממשלה, משפטנים והשחקנים בשוק בעקרונות שתורמים להצלחה ) או לנקודות תורפה ( בתכנון רגולציה אפקטיבית. הכנס יכלול הרצאות ופאנל מומחים באשר לרגולציה הפיננסית בישראל.
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 4
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 113 BasesFoundation
Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 1
 
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Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 1 - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-06 - Product 281618-1-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. Experts in economics, regulation, and corporate governance testified on the causes and effects of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. Topics included excessive CEO compensation, bad judgment by executives, relaxation of regulation, easy access to credit, excessive leveraging by investment banks, and the assumption that housing values would continue to rise. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held the first in a series of oversight hearings on the regulatory mistakes and financial excesses that led to the market breakdown on Wall Street, and on the impact of the crisis on financial markets and the U.S. economy. This session focused on the causes and effects of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281618-1
Views: 8261 HouseResourceOrg
Regulatory BODY in India (RBI , SEBI , IRDAI , PFRDA , etc) for All Govt Exams
 
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दोस्तों नोट्स और Updates के लिए Telegram पर हमें JOIN करे । https://t.me/cafofficial Regulators in India (RBI , SEBI , IRDAI , PFRDA , etc) for All Govt Exams Like Our Facebook Page : https://goo.gl/V9RrYz Join our Study Group https://goo.gl/Ygba1C Join our Twitter Handle https://goo.gl/P6vHCs Join our Gplus updates : https://goo.gl/C97U5g
Elizabeth Warren Explains The Effect That Deregulation Has Had On Our Financial System and Economy
 
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From Dan Rather Reports (2009) "SOLD". Rising unemployment, weak home prices and an increasing foreclosure crisis, are threatening families, cities and the entire U.S. economy. We speak to Harvard law professor, and bankruptcy specialist, Elizabeth Warren, who has studied the economy and foreclosures and their dramatic, long term effect on the middle class of the United States. Also, what happens to all those houses that are repossessed by the banks? They are often auctioned off to the highest bidder. A huge home auction in Fort Myers, Florida takes place over three days while just a few miles away families line up at a food kitchen. Learn how the great recession has created a surprising and burgeoning problem in the wealthiest nation on earth -- hunger. In this exerpt, Warren talks about "Market Regulation".
Views: 9544 Marie Marr
Media Regulation: Crash Course Government and Politics #45
 
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Today we wrap up our discussion of the media by talking about how the government interacts with and influences the content we see. Now it may be easy to assume that because we live in a free-market capitalist society, the only real regulation of the media is determined by the consumers, but this isn’t necessarily true. The government controls a number of factors including the potential for lawsuits, spectrum licensing, FCC fines, and has even tried to pass a bit of legislation. So we’ll talk about how all of these factors influence the media and end with a discussion of a pretty hotly debated topic these days - net neutrality. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 192868 CrashCourse
22. Public and Non-Profit Finance
 
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Financial Markets (2011) (ECON 252) As an introduction to public and nonprofit finance, Professor Shiller reflects on the remarkable financial structures that we have in support of public causes, making possible the achievement of higher goals that transcend individual satisfaction of needs. He gives examples of nonprofits, illustrating how that financial form can support a moral mission and social purpose. There is however sometimes a fine line between for-profit and public enterprises, because similar companies can be either for-profit or non-profit and because governments regulate and collect corporate profits taxes on for profit-organizations, implicitly creating a public purpose for them. Subsequently, he covers state and local finance, outlining the difference between operating budgets and capital budgets as well as the tax-exemption of municipal bonds. During the last part of the lecture, he provides an overview of historic improvement in governmental social insurance that ranges from progressive taxes to public services and to old age, survivors, and disability insurance. All of these advances in public and nonprofit finance have taken place in step with other advances in human society, notably advances in information technology. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Organizations Supporting Individual Causes 06:45 - Chapter 2. Nonprofits: Pursuing Common Interests 18:55 - Chapter 3. Government Involvement in For-Profits 32:26 - Chapter 4. Social Entrepreneurship and Distinguishing between Nonprofits and For-Profits 36:43 - Chapter 5. Municipal, State and Local Finance 46:06 - Chapter 6. Tax-Exemption of Municipal Bonds 51:24 - Chapter 7. Government Social Insurance -- From Progressive Taxes to Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) 01:00:10 - Chapter 8. The Invention of Social Insurance in Germany 01:10:20 - Chapter 9. Review of the Social Purpose of Finance and of Behavioral Finance Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 23077 YaleCourses
Bill Black: Financial Regulations In Paralysis
 
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Bill Black knows banks. As a federal litigator in the late 1980s, Black played a central role in prosecuting the corruption responsible for the savings and loan crisis of the late 1980s. Since then he’s become one of America's top experts on financial fraud, which he see as endemic to the modern financial system. In this interview, Black expresses his lament that the U.S. has descended into a type of crony capitalism that makes continued fraud a virtual certainty while increasingly neutering the safeguards intended to prevent and punish such abuse. This was not the case when Black was a regulator. In the aftermath of the S&L crisis, the U.S. Office of Thrift Supervision brought 3,000 lawsuits against identified perpetrators. In a number of cases, the OTS was able to claw back the funds and profits that the convicted parties had fraudulently obtained. Fast forward to the 2008 financial collapse, in which the losses related to the household sector alone were over 70 times greater than they were during heart of the S&L crisis. The fraud was rampant and fairly obvious. Yet how many criminal referrals did the OTS make? Zero. What happened? Why has the OTS and other regulators allowed the same managements that crashed the mortgage market and dragged down the global financial markets with them to remain unprosecuted and free to continue looting the system? To be sure, some of the fraudulent activity has been exposed, and the top banks have paid numerous fines for bad behavior. There have been a lot of settlements and civil cases, indicating that fraud was rampant. But in finance, you can always make more money. Prosecutions, on the other hand, get everyone’s attention. Yet, Washington has been paralyzed. The U.S. attorney general has not begun a single investigation of criminal behavior by top management at major multinational banks. Seemingly there’s no real punishment for major misbehavior in the financial markets anymore. In this interview, Black names names and highlights the extent of the government's complicity in extending this disgraceful state of affairs.
Views: 11597 New Economic Thinking
Re-regulation Of Financial Markets Necessary
 
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US Representative Keith Ellison hosted a financial forum in Minneapolis' Powderhorn Park recreational center in the fifth congressional district. Prentiss Cox, a lawyer, spoke on the panel. Here is his opening speech.
Views: 122 Michael McIntee
Financial Market Regulation Conference
 
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Ambassador Eacho opened the one-day conference on financial market regulations in the U.S. and the EU. Mr. Baird Webel, Specialist in Financial Economics with the Congressional Research Service gave the keynote speech at the conference that convened members of the EU Parliament, EU Commission representatives, Austrian banking officials, academia, policy makers and the media.
Views: 360 USEmbassyVienna
Best Documentary of the Housing Market Crash (of 2019?) | Inside the Meltdown | Behind the Big Short
 
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MELTDOWN - The Men Who Crashed The World - 2019 The first of a four-part investigation into a world of greed and recklessness that led to financial collapse. In the first episode of Meltdown, we hear about four men who brought down the global economy: a billionaire mortgage-seller who fooled millions; a high-rolling banker with a fatal weakness; a ferocious Wall Street predator; and the power behind the throne. The crash of September 2008 brought the largest bankruptcies in world history, pushing more than 30 million people into unemployment and bringing many countries to the edge of insolvency. Wall Street turned back the clock to 1929. But how did it all go so wrong? Lack of government regulation; easy lending in the US housing market meant anyone could qualify for a home loan with no government regulations in place. Also, London was competing with New York as the banking capital of the world. Gordon Brown, the British finance minister at the time, introduced 'light touch regulation' - giving bankers a free hand in the marketplace. All this, and with key players making the wrong financial decisions, saw the world's biggest financial collapse. Trading Strategies Live Trade Coaching Binary Options CFD's Futures Equities Commodities FX
Views: 962371 TradingCoachUK
Should Government Bail Out Big Banks?
 
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Should the government bail out big banks that may otherwise go bankrupt? Or should it let them go under, as it did with Lehman Brothers in 2008? Economist Nicole Gelinas, a fellow at the Manhattan Institute, has the answer, and it will have big implications for policymakers when they grapple with the next economic crisis. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: In 2008, America experienced the biggest meltdown of its financial sector since the Great Depression. The conventional wisdom is that this failure and subsequent government rescue, commonly known as "the bailout" was brought about by three decades of bank de-regulation. There were a lot of causes for the meltdown, but deregulation wasn't one of them. Ironically, it wasn't because the banks had become unmoored from government control that led them into the financial storm, it was because they had become too closely tied to government. For three decades Uncle Sam, like an enabling parent, had always "been there" when the big banks got into trouble. The shock in 2008 was that for one brief moment, Uncle Sam wasn't there. In the wee hours of September 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy. The financial industry waited for the Feds to step in and save Lehman bondholders like it saved those of Bear Stearns some months earlier. That didn't happen. Global financial markets seized up. As the Dow Jones Industrial average fell 498 points, or nearly 4.4 percent, financial institutions effectively went on strike. Banks wouldn't lend money to other banks and thus, indirectly, to the public because they had no idea which financial institution might go belly up next. The economy can withstand a stock-market crash, but a credit-market freeze -- essentially a cash freeze -- can cause a Depression, as credit underpins almost all business and personal activities. Indeed, some large companies, including General Electric, were so dependent on these short-term credit markets that they were in danger of not being able to pay their workers. The financial industry pleaded with the government to act. Later in the same day, September 15, it did. The Feds wouldn't save Lehman's but it would save AIG, the primary insurer of mortgage loans. A month later, the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), a $700 billion plan to pump taxpayer cash into America's banks and financial institutions was approved by Congress. Public officials generally agreed that the free market had failed. In November 2008, President George W. Bush came to New York to explain why he, a Republican president, had signed TARP into law. "I'm a market-oriented guy, but not when I'm faced with the prospect of a global meltdown," he said. But free-market capitalism had not melted down. Again, the problem was not that banks had been too free, but that they had grown too dependent on government over the last few decades. Here's a brief history. America's first post-Depression bailout of a big bank came in 1984 when the Republican administration of Ronald Reagan, with help from the Federal Reserve bailed out Continental Illinois, the eighth largest commercial bank in the nation. The bailout introduced the phrase "too big to fail" to the financial media's vocabulary. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/should-government-bail-out-big-banks
Views: 810436 PragerU
What is Deregulation?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Deregulation” Cutting red tape. The process of removing legal or quasi-legal restrictions on the amount of competition, the sorts of business done, or the prices charged within a particular industry. During the last two decades of the 20th century, many governments committed to the free market pursued policies of liberalization based on substantial amounts of deregulation hand-in-hand with the privatization of industries owned by the state. The aim was to decrease the role of government in the economy and to increase competition. Even so, red tape is alive and well. In the united states, with some 60 federal agencies issuing more than 1,800 rules a year, in 1998 the code of federal regulations was more than 130,000 pages thick. However, not all regulation is necessarily bad. According to estimates by the American office of management and budget, the annual cost of these rules was $289 billion, but the annual benefits were $298 billion. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy - ITA
Financial Industry Regulation: Assisting the Banking and Financial Markets - Elizabeth Warren (2009)
 
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Critics such as economist Paul Krugman and U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner have argued that the regulatory framework did not keep pace with financial innovation, such as the increasing importance of the shadow banking system, derivatives and off-balance sheet financing. A recent OECD study suggest that bank regulation based on the Basel accords encourage unconventional business practices and contributed to or even reinforced the financial crisis. In other cases, laws were changed or enforcement weakened in parts of the financial system. Key examples include: Jimmy Carter's Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 (DIDMCA) phased out a number of restrictions on banks' financial practices, broadened their lending powers, allowed credit unions and savings and loans to offer checkable deposits, and raised the deposit insurance limit from $40,000 to $100,000 (thereby potentially lessening depositor scrutiny of lenders' risk management policies.)[87] In October 1982, U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Garn--St. Germain Depository Institutions Act, which provided for adjustable-rate mortgage loans, began the process of banking deregulation,[citation needed] and contributed to the savings and loan crisis of the late 1980s/early 1990s.[88] In November 1999, U.S. President Bill Clinton signed into law the Gramm--Leach--Bliley Act, which repealed part of the Glass--Steagall Act of 1933. This repeal has been criticized for reducing the separation between commercial banks (which traditionally had fiscally conservative policies) and investment banks (which had a more risk-taking culture).[89][90] However, the vast majority of failures were at institutions that were created by Glass-Steagall.[91] In 2004, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission relaxed the net capital rule, which enabled investment banks to substantially increase the level of debt they were taking on, fueling the growth in mortgage-backed securities supporting subprime mortgages. The SEC has conceded that self-regulation of investment banks contributed to the crisis.[92][93] Financial institutions in the shadow banking system are not subject to the same regulation as depository banks, allowing them to assume additional debt obligations relative to their financial cushion or capital base.[94] This was the case despite the Long-Term Capital Management debacle in 1998, where a highly leveraged shadow institution failed with systemic implications. Regulators and accounting standard-setters allowed depository banks such as Citigroup to move significant amounts of assets and liabilities off-balance sheet into complex legal entities called structured investment vehicles, masking the weakness of the capital base of the firm or degree of leverage or risk taken. One news agency estimated that the top four U.S. banks will have to return between $500 billion and $1 trillion to their balance sheets during 2009.[95] This increased uncertainty during the crisis regarding the financial position of the major banks.[96] Off-balance sheet entities were also used by Enron as part of the scandal that brought down that company in 2001.[97] As early as 1997, Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan fought to keep the derivatives market unregulated.[98] With the advice of the President's Working Group on Financial Markets,[99] the U.S. Congress and President allowed the self-regulation of the over-the-counter derivatives market when they enacted the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000. Derivatives such as credit default swaps (CDS) can be used to hedge or speculate against particular credit risks. The volume of CDS outstanding increased 100-fold from 1998 to 2008, with estimates of the debt covered by CDS contracts, as of November 2008, ranging from US$33 to $47 trillion. Total over-the-counter (OTC) derivative notional value rose to $683 trillion by June 2008.[100] Warren Buffett famously referred to derivatives as "financial weapons of mass destruction" in early 2003.[101][102] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financial_crisis_of_2007%E2%80%9308
Views: 1820 The Film Archives
Economic Collapse Confirmed! $22 Trillion Dollar Darkness Of Government Debt 2019 Stock Market CRASH
 
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Shocking video of the imminent economic collapse and the next Great Depression of the United States. The U.S. national debt is wildly out of control, and nobody in Washington seems to care.  According to the U.S. Treasury, the federal government is currently $21,968,903,151,139 in debt.  In just a few days, that figure will cross the 22 trillion dollar mark.  Over the last 10 years, we have added more than 11 trillion dollars to the national debt, and that means that it has been growing at a pace of more than a trillion dollars a year and will cause the biggest economic collapse in history and of course a devastating stock market crash.  To call this a major national crisis would be a massive understatement, and yet there is absolutely no urgency in Washington address this absolutely critical issue.  We are literally destroying the financial future of this nation, but most Americans don’t seem to understand the economic collapse is in our doorstep. If we went back and removed the 11 trillion dollars that the federal government borrowed and spent over the last decade, we would be in the worst economic crisis in American history right now.  But by stealing from the future, the federal government has been able to stabilize things. The global financial elite are really starting to talk up the possibility of a new financial collapse and a major stock market crash. Unfortunately, the future always arrives eventually, and the greatest economic collapse will hit America in the near future. The former fed chair, now a scholar at the Brookings Institution, said there remains an agenda of unfinished regulation. “I’m not sure we’re working on those things in the way we should, and then there remain holes, and then there’s regulatory pushback. So I do worry that we could have another economic collapse.” Our world has never seen anything like the imminent economic collapse that we are facing right now, and most of that debt was accumulated when interest rates were low.  We are heading into a major economic crisis and global depression. the truth is that the government debt is an existential threat to the future of this nation, and we are systematically destroying the very bright future that our children and our grandchildren were supposed to have. The national debt is a problem that should have been handled 20 or 30 years ago. But it wasn’t. This current system is headed for an inevitable economic collapse.  There is no way of getting around it. A horrific stock market crash and economic collapse is coming. It is going to change the world. You better get ready. COURTESY: NO RE-UPLOAD, NO REUSE - FOR LICENSING, PLEASE, CONTACT The Economic Collapse Blog - http://www.theeconomiccollapseblog.com Fair Use Notice: This video contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational, and/or criticism or commentary use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their web site, or wants us to add their photo. Most of artwork that are included with these videos have been created by Epic Economist and they are used as a representation of the subject matter. The representative artwork included with these videos shall not be construed as the actual events that are taking place. Anything that is said on the video is either opinion, criticism, information or commentary,  If making any type of investment or legal decision it would be wise to contact or consult a professional before making that decision. Use the information found in these videos as a starting point for conducting your own research and conduct your own due diligence before making any significant investing decisions.
Views: 174423 Epic Economist
Global Financial Meltdown - One Of The Best Financial Crisis Documentary Films
 
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Meltdown is a four-part investigation into a world of greed and recklessness that brought down the financial world. The show begins with the 2008 crash that pushed 30 million people into unemployment, brought countries to the edge of insolvency and turned the clock back to 1929. But how did it all go so wrong? Lack of government regulation; easy lending in the US housing market meant anyone could qualify for a home loan with no government regulations in place. Also, London was competing with New York as the banking capital of the world. Gordon Brown, the British finance minister at the time, introduced "light touch regulation" - giving bankers a free hand in the marketplace. Meltdown moves on to examine the epidemic of fear that caused the world's banks to stop lending and how the people began their fight back. Finally, it asks how the world can prepare for the next crisis even as it recognises that this one is far from over. We hear about the sheikh who says the crash never happened; a Wall Street king charged with fraud; a congresswoman who wants to jail the bankers; and the world leaders who want a re-think of capitalism. http://www.RebelMystic.com
Views: 2010255 Rebel Mystic
Guido Hülsmann, "Government regulation of financial markets..." - Parte 5
 
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This presentation comes from the Second International Conference The Austrian School of Economics in the 21st Century, held at the Chancellors Government Building of the Rosario National University (Rosario Argentina) in August, 2008. The Event was co-organized by Bases Foundation and Hayek Foundation. For more information, please visit: www.fundacionbases.org Esta presentación proviene del Segundo Congreso Internacional La Escuela Austríaca en el Siglo XXI, llevado a cabo en la Sede de Gobierno del Rectorado de la Universidad Nacional de Rosario (Rosario Argentina) en agosto de 2008. El evento fue co-organizado por la Fundación Bases y la Fundación Hayek. Para más información, por favor visite: www.fundacionbases.org
Views: 129 BasesFoundation
Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 2
 
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Financial Market Regulation and Practices, Panel 2 - House Oversight Committee - 2008-10-06 - Product 281618-2-DVD - House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. Richard Fuld, Jr., board chairman and chief executive officer of Lehman Brothers Holdings and Lehman Brothers, testified about the bankruptcy of the company. Topics included his role at Lehman Brothers, allegations of fraud, and his compensation from the company. The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee held the first in a series of oversight hearings on the regulatory mistakes and financial excesses that led to the market breakdown on Wall Street, and on the impact of the crisis on financial markets and the U.S. economy. This session focused on the causes and effects of the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/281618-2
Views: 120346 HouseResourceOrg
Should Securities Markets Be Transparent? Financial Markets, Trading & Regulation (2009)
 
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Public securities markets are either primary or secondary markets. In the primary market, the money for the securities is received by the issuer of the securities from investors, typically in an initial public offering (IPO). In the secondary market, the securities are simply assets held by one investor selling them to another investor, with the money going from one investor to the other. An initial public offering is when a company issues public stock newly to investors, called an "IPO" for short. A company can later issue more new shares, or issue shares that have been previously registered in a shelf registration. These later new issues are also sold in the primary market, but they are not considered to be an IPO but are often called a "secondary offering". Issuers usually retain investment banks to assist them in administering the IPO, obtaining SEC (or other regulatory body) approval of the offering filing, and selling the new issue. When the investment bank buys the entire new issue from the issuer at a discount to resell it at a markup, it is called a firm commitment underwriting. However, if the investment bank considers the risk too great for an underwriting, it may only assent to a best effort agreement, where the investment bank will simply do its best to sell the new issue. For the primary market to thrive, there must be a secondary market, or aftermarket that provides liquidity for the investment security—where holders of securities can sell them to other investors for cash. Otherwise, few people would purchase primary issues, and, thus, companies and governments would be restricted in raising equity capital (money) for their operations. Organized exchanges constitute the main secondary markets. Many smaller issues and most debt securities trade in the decentralized, dealer-based over-the-counter markets. In Europe, the principal trade organization for securities dealers is the International Capital Market Association.[2] In the U.S., the principal trade organization for securities dealers is the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association,[3] which is the result of the merger of the Securities Industry Association and the Bond Market Association. The Financial Information Services Division of the Software and Information Industry Association (FISD/SIIA)[4] represents a round-table of market data industry firms, referring to them as Consumers, Exchanges, and Vendors. In India the equivalent organisation is the securities exchange board of India (SEBI). In the primary markets, securities may be offered to the public in a public offer. Alternatively, they may be offered privately to a limited number of qualified persons in a private placement. Sometimes a combination of the two is used. The distinction between the two is important to securities regulation and company law. Privately placed securities are not publicly tradable and may only be bought and sold by sophisticated qualified investors. As a result, the secondary market is not nearly as liquid as it is for public (registered) securities. Another category, sovereign bonds, is generally sold by auction to a specialized class of dealers. Securities are often listed in a stock exchange, an organized and officially recognized market on which securities can be bought and sold. Issuers may seek listings for their securities to attract investors, by ensuring there is a liquid and regulated market that investors can buy and sell securities in. Growth in informal electronic trading systems has challenged the traditional business of stock exchanges. Large volumes of securities are also bought and sold "over the counter" (OTC). OTC dealing involves buyers and sellers dealing with each other by telephone or electronically on the basis of prices that are displayed electronically, usually by commercial information vendors such as SuperDerivatives, Reuters and Bloomberg. There are also eurosecurities, which are securities that are issued outside their domestic market into more than one jurisdiction. They are generally listed on the Luxembourg Stock Exchange or admitted to listing in London. The reasons for listing eurobonds include regulatory and tax considerations, as well as the investment restrictions. London is the centre of the eurosecurities markets. There was a huge rise in the eurosecurities market in London in the early 1980s. Settlement of trades in eurosecurities is currently effected through two European computerized clearing/depositories called Euroclear (in Belgium) and Clearstream (formerly Cedelbank) in Luxembourg. The main market for Eurobonds is the EuroMTS, owned by Borsa Italiana and Euronext. There are ramp up market in Emergent countries, but it is growing slowly. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securities
Views: 2933 The Film Archives
Financial Markets between Investment & Regulations with Mr. Tarek Zebian (Director at CMA)
 
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► What do you know about investing in Financial Markets⁉ 💥The topics discussed in this short interview are the following: ⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇⬇ 1- What are Financial Markets? 2- Are Financial Markets related to Gambling? 3- What is the main role of the CMA in organizing this sector? 4- Are you a Startup?? Do you want to sell shares to fund your activities?? How will the "Electronic Trading Platform" Contribute in this? 👉Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: "Abdallah Harfouch"
Views: 2349 Abdallah Harfouch
Why Aren't There More Financial Market Regulations?
 
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A reader asks Veronique de Rugy: In light of the Credit Default Swap meltdown and the recent problem with JPMorgan, why shouldn't the financial markets be more tightly regulated?
Views: 186 The Daily Beast
Unintended Consequences of the New Financial Regulations
 
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Speaker(s): Dr Jon Danielsson, Professor Charles Goodhart, Matt King Chair: Professor Christopher Polk Recorded on 11 March 2013 in Old Theatre, Old Building. The first public event of the ESRC Systemic Risk Centre at LSE will debate whether the post crisis reforms of financial regulations will be effective in protecting us from financial excesses, or may perversely destabilise the financial system. The panel of experts will debate the topic and take questions from the audience. Jon Danielsson is the director of the Systemic Risk Centre at LSE. His research interests include financial stability, systemic risk, extreme market movements, market liquidity and financial crisis. He has published his research extensively in both academic journals and the mainstream media, and has presented his work at a number of universities and institutions. Charles Goodhart is emeritus professor of Banking and Finance with the Financial Markets Group at LSE, having previously, 1987-2005, been its deputy director. Until his retirement in 2002, he had been the Norman Sosnow Professor of Banking and Finance at LSE since 1985. Before then, he had worked at the Bank of England for seventeen years as a monetary adviser, becoming a chief adviser in 1980. In 1997 he was appointed one of the outside independent members of the Bank of England's new Monetary Policy Committee until May 2000. Earlier he had taught at Cambridge and LSE. Besides numerous articles, he has written a couple of books on monetary history; a graduate monetary textbook, Money, Information and Uncertainty (2nd Ed. 1989); two collections of papers on monetary policy, Monetary Theory and Practice (1984) and The Central Bank and The Financial System (1995); and a number of books and articles on Financial Stability, on which subject he was adviser to the Governor of the Bank of England, 2002-2004, and numerous other studies relating to financial markets and to monetary policy and history. His latest books include The Basel Committee on Banking Supervision: A History of the Early Years, 1974-1997, (2011), and The Regulatory Response to the Financial Crisis, (2009). Matt King is managing director and global head of Credit Products Strategy at Citi. His team is responsible for forming views and advising clients on the full spectrum of credit, across high grade, high yield, leveraged loan, structured, emerging and municipal bond markets. While the majority of clients are investors, he also deals frequently with issuers and regulators on everything from market direction to valuation to risk management. Matt King is a frequent speaker at industry conferences and has published extensively on credit markets over the past two decades. Some of his most widely referenced pieces include Are the brokers broken? (published two weeks before Lehman's bankruptcy), Buy the bubbles, sell the bath, and How much debt is too much debt? Prior to joining Citi in 2003, Mr King was head of European Credit Strategy at JPMorgan. He is British, and a graduate of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he read Social & Political Sciences.
Indian Financial System (Hindi) | CA Final SFM (New Syllabus) Classes & Video Lectures
 
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Visit our website https://sfmguru.in/ to learn more Subscribe to our channel for more videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiPzkqrzDsoq-pLrloT7Fcw/featured A Financial System is a composition of various institutions, markets, regulations, laws, practices, money managers, analysts and transactions. The financial system performs the essential economic function of channelling funds from those who are net savers (i.e. who spend less than their income) to those who are net spenders (i.e. who wish to spend or invest more than their income). In other words, the financial system allows net savers to lend funds to net spenders. Funds are intermediated by banks and other credit institutions, and directly via financial markets through the issuance of securities. An efficient allocation of funds, together with financial stability, contribute to economic growth and prosperity. The most important lenders are normally households, but firms, public entities and non-residents may also lend out excess funds. The principal borrowers are typically non-financial corporations and government, but households and non-residents also sometimes borrow to finance their purchases. Funds flow from lenders to borrowers via two routes. In direct or market-based finance, debtors borrow funds directly from investors operating on the financial markets by selling them financial instruments, also called securities (such as debt securities and shares), which are claims on the borrower’s future income or assets. If financial intermediaries play an additional role in the channeling of funds, one refers to indirect finance. Financial intermediaries can be classified into credit institutions, other monetary financial institutions and other financial intermediaries, and they are part of the financial system. Banking Financial Institutions Banking institutions are those institutions, which participate in the country’s payment system, i.e. they provide transaction services. They play an important role in the mobilization of deposits and distribution of credit to various sectors of the economy. A sound banking system ensures that deposits accumulated from people are productively utilized. Banking sector is dominant in India as it accounts for nearly half of the total financial assets in the financial sector. Non-Banking Financial Institutions Non-banking financial institutions are those institutions which act as mere providers of credit and they do not create credit, e.g., LIC, UTI, and IDBI. Composition of Indian Financial System Indian Financial System is composed of the following: 1. Scheduled Commercial Banks 2. Insurance Companies 3. NBFCs 4. Mutual Funds 5. Foreign Institutional Investors 6. Urban Cooperative Banks 7. Regional Rural Banks 8. National Pension System Fund
Views: 14461 CA Nikhil Jobanputra
Roles and Responsibilities of Inspectors General in Financial Markets Regulatory Agencies (Part 1)
 
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Roles and Responsibilities of Inspectors General in Financial Markets Regulatory Agencies (Part 1) - House Oversight Committee - 2009-03-25 - House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. The Government Management, Organization and Procurement Subcommittee will hold a hearing titled: "Roles and Responsibilities of Inspectors General in Financial Markets Regulatory Agencies." The hearing will take place in room 2247 Rayburn House Office Building. Video provided by the U.S. House of Representatives.
Views: 14 HouseResourceOrg
ISU MBA in Panama - Dalia Marciukaityte
 
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Teaching experience: Financial Management, Financial Markets, International Finance, and Financial Econometrics. Her research interests are in government regulations, market competition, corporate finance, and behavioral finance. She taught Financial Management, Financial Markets, International Finance, and Financial Econometrics, working with undergraduate, master, and doctoral students.
Financial markets 3: asymmetric information
 
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Econ 103, UMass Amherst
Views: 2857 Gerald Friedman
How Do Hedge Funds Operate? Financial Markets, Compensation, Taxes, Regulations, Risks (2008)
 
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In June 2006, prompted by a letter from Gary J. Aguirre, the Senate Judiciary Committee began an investigation into the links between hedge funds and independent analysts. Aguirre was fired from his job with the SEC when, as lead investigator of insider trading allegations against Pequot Capital Management, he tried to interview John Mack, then being considered for chief executive officer at Morgan Stanley.[197] The Judiciary Committee and the US Senate Finance Committee issued a scathing report in 2007, which found that Aguirre had been illegally fired in reprisal[198] for his pursuit of Mack and in 2009, the SEC was forced to re-open its case against Pequot. Pequot settled with the SEC for US$28 million and Arthur J. Samberg, chief investment officer of Pequot, was barred from working as an investment advisor.[199] Pequot closed its doors under the pressure of investigations.[200] The systemic practice of hedge funds submitting periodic electronic questionnaires to stock analysts as a part of market research was reported in by The New York Times in July 2012. According to the report, one motivation for the questionnaires was to obtain subjective information not available to the public and possible early notice of trading recommendations that could produce short term market movements. According to modern portfolio theory, rational investors will seek to hold portfolios that are mean/variance efficient (that is, portfolios offer the highest level of return per unit of risk, and the lowest level of risk per unit of return). One of the attractive features of hedge funds (in particular market neutral and similar funds) is that they sometimes have a modest correlation with traditional assets such as equities. This means that hedge funds have a potentially quite valuable role in investment portfolios as diversifiers, reducing overall portfolio risk.[69] However, there are three reasons why one might not wish to allocate a high proportion of assets into hedge funds. These reasons are: Hedge funds are highly individual and it is hard to estimate the likely returns or risks; Hedge funds' low correlation with other assets tends to dissipate during stressful market events, making them much less useful for diversification than they may appear; and Hedge fund returns are reduced considerably by the high fee structures that are typically charged. Several studies have suggested that hedge funds are sufficiently diversifying to merit inclusion in investor portfolios, but this is disputed for example by Mark Kritzman[202][203] who performed a mean-variance optimization calculation on an opportunity set that consisted of a stock index fund, a bond index fund, and ten hypothetical hedge funds. The optimizer found that a mean-variance efficient portfolio did not contain any allocation to hedge funds, largely because of the impact of performance fees. To demonstrate this, Kritzman repeated the optimization using an assumption that the hedge funds incurred no performance fees. The result from this second optimization was an allocation of 74% to hedge funds. The other factor reducing the attractiveness of hedge funds in a diversified portfolio is that they tend to under-perform during equity bear markets, just when an investor needs part of their portfolio to add value.[69] For example, in January--September 2008, the Credit Suisse/Tremont Hedge Fund Index[204] was down 9.87%. According to the same index series, even "dedicated short bias" funds had a return of −6.08% during September 2008. In other words, even though low average correlations may appear to make hedge funds attractive this may not work in turbulent period, for example around the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedge_funds
Views: 24423 The Film Archives
What is BANK REGULATION? What does BANK REGULATION mean? BANK REGULATION meaning & explanation
 
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What is BANK REGULATION? What does BANK REGULATION mean? BANK REGULATION meaning - BANK REGULATION definition - BANK REGULATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Bank regulation is a form of government regulation which subjects banks to certain requirements, restrictions and guidelines, designed to create market transparency between banking institutions and the individuals and corporations with whom they conduct business, among other things. Given the interconnectedness of the banking industry and the reliance that the national (and global) economy hold on banks, it is important for regulatory agencies to maintain control over the standardized practices of these institutions. Supporters of such regulation often base their arguments on the "too big to fail" notion. This holds that many financial institutions (particularly investment banks with a commercial arm) hold too much control over the economy to fail without enormous consequences. This is the premise for government bailouts, in which government financial assistance is provided to banks or other financial institutions who appear to be on the brink of collapse. The belief is that without this aid, the crippled banks would not only become bankrupt, but would create rippling effects throughout the economy leading to systemic failure.
Views: 930 The Audiopedia
The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis | Brian S. Wesbury | TEDxCountyLineRoad
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. The Great Economic Myth of 2008, challenging the accounting to accounting principal. Brian Wesbury is Chief Economist at First Trust Advisors L.P., a financial services firm based in Wheaton, Illinois. Mr. Wesbury has been a member of the Academic Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago since 1999. In 2012, he was named a Fellow of the George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas, TX where he works closely with its 4%-Growth Project. His writing appears in various magazines, newspapers and blogs, and he appears regularly on Fox, Bloomberg, CNBCand BNN Canada TV. In 1995 and 1996, he served as Chief Economist for the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. The Wall Street Journal ranked Mr. Wesbury the nation’s #1 U.S. economic forecaster in 2001, and USA Today ranked him as one of the nation’s top 10 forecasters in 2004. Mr. Wesbury began his career in 1982 at the Harris Bank in Chicago. Former positions include Vice President and Economist for the Chicago Corporation and Senior Vice President and Chief Economist for Griffin, Kubik, Stephens, & Thompson. Mr. Wesbury received an M.B.A. from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Graduate School of Management, and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Montana. McGraw-Hill published his first book, The New Era of Wealth, in October 1999. His most recent book, It’s Not As Bad As You Think, was published in November 2009 by John Wiley & Sons. In 2011, Mr. Wesbury received the University of Montana’s Distinguished Alumni Award. This award honors outstanding alumni who have “brought honor to the University, the state or the nation.” There have been 267 recipients of this award out of a potential pool of 91,000 graduates. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 1955183 TEDx Talks
Pedro Schwartz on the creation of money out of thin air
 
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Subscribe to our newsletter at http://www.goldmoney.com/goldresearch. GoldMoney's James Turk interviews Prof. Pedro Schwartz who is the president of the Economic and Social Council of Madrid. They talk about bank regulation, the creation of money out of thin air and the beauty of the free market system. They discuss how banks have expanded despite of government regulation which Schwartz in large attributes to the granted privilege of fractional reserve lending. Using this procedure a bank can create loans above the actual amount of deposits at hand and therefore create new money. This also leads to fragility in the banking system and to boom and bust cycles. Schwartz argues for a leaner and more effective regulation of financial markets as the current regulation has not worked in regards to the financial crisis. They talk about the "tennis" between the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank when it comes to the creating money out of thin air. Schwartz states that the ECB is disregarding the rules that were aimed to guard it from being influenced by political pressure. Despite the opposition of the German Bundesbank they are buying government bonds. This is equal to digital money printing and Schwartz scents that it is not being done for monetary policy, but for the stimulation of the economy which goes beyond the original remit of the bank. However despite the injections of new liquidity by the ECB Europe is still in recession, because interbank lending has dried up. That means that banks are parking much of the liquidity back at the ECB. The big question will be what will happen to inflation once the economy starts to pick up again and those funds find their way into the real economy. Schwartz also questions whether it is a productive business when banks can make a profit by borrowing money from the ECB at 1% interest and then turning around to buy government bond which yield 5% or 6%. A serious inflationary disaster will only be prevented if governments will succeed in reducing their deficits and stop selling bonds. Schwartz states that cutting government spending is the only viable solution to the problem. To accomplish this there has to be a change in social mentality so that people recognise that nothing is free and that the government sector has to shrink. In the end the market is the most efficient mechanism of allocating resources according to the wants and needs of people. This video was recorded on 14 September 2012 in Madrid.
Views: 17182 Goldmoney
Market Failures, Taxes, and Subsidies: Crash Course Economics #21
 
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This week on Crash Course Econ, Jacob and Adriene are talking about failure. Specifically, we're talking about market failures. When markets don't provide a good or service efficiently, that's a market failure. When markets fail, often governments step in to provide those services. Stuff like public education or military protection are good examples of market failures. So, what are some of the ways governments address, market failures? Well, it's funny you should ask, as we also talk about that in this episode. We'll get into taxes and subsidies and externalities and a bunch of other important stuff this week on Crash Course Econ. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 620072 CrashCourse