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How to write an Article (Cambridge First, Advanced; Blogs)
 
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Article writing is a very different style of writing and requires a different approach from the essay. In this lesson, we look at how to write for the Cambridge tests, as well as how to write for the web, including blogs and newsletters. Find out how to use a more playful language to capture a reader’s attention. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 158556 Write to Top
How to Write an Abstract Step-by-Step (With Examples)
 
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How to Write an Abstract. Once you’re done with your academic paper after months of hard work, you’ll also need to create an abstract of your paper, too. Since this writing summarizes and represents your work, you’ll want it to be picture perfect, right? Lucky for you, we’ve put together some tips on writing the best abstract, so pay close attention! TIMESTAMPS Find out the requirements 0:55 Pick the right abstract type 1:42 Consider your readers 3:27 Explain the importance of your research 4:10 Explain the problem and your methods 4:45 Avoid copy-pasting 5:19 Keep it well-structured and logical 6:15 Include key phrases and words 7:00 Sum it up 7:49 Editing and proofreading 8:18 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Whether you’re writing it to apply for a conference, grant, journal publication, or work project, find out if there are any specific requirements regarding its length and style. -When it comes to abstract types, you have two options to choose from: descriptive versus informative. Normally, descriptive abstracts are written for shorter papers, and informative ones for longer more technical pieces. -Fellow scholars from the same research field will easily get the ideas and special terminology you use, while average readers or people from another scientific field probably won’t grasp complicated concepts. -As you get down to actually writing the abstract, there are four key points you wanna hit when explaining the importance of your research to your readers. -It’s really important to define the scope of your research. It’s imperative that your research has a key claim or argument, which is definitely worth mentioning in the abstract. -Your abstract should be an independent piece of writing and not a collage of disconnected paraphrased sentences. -No matter how short it has to be, your abstract should be built according to the usual essay model and have an introduction, body, and conclusion. -If you want your prospective readers to be able to find your work among millions of publications, adding 5 to 10 important key words or phrases to your abstract will certainly help. -An informative abstract should explain what answers the research helped you find and if it supported your original argument. -Check your abstract several times for grammar and spelling, and don’t forget to format it the right way. Another pair of eyes won’t hurt either. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 93519 BRIGHT SIDE
How to Write the Academic Critique Assignment--Critique of Academic Journal Article
 
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Review of a model APA paper for the critique and presentation assignment of PSYC 334, Summer 2014.
Views: 97025 David Taylor
Tips for writing journal article summaries
 
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NOTE: This video is aimed at students working on one specific "journal article summary" assignment in my classes. So others may find it helpful, but please always keep in mind that different instructors will want different things in your work. Suggestions on how to write cohesive, succinct summaries. This includes advice on what information to include and what to omit, and information about common mistakes that students frequently make on this assignment.
Views: 71943 Rachelle Tannenbaum
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
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Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 324338 David Taylor
How to write the Results part 1
 
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For science students who speak English as a second or foreign language. Explains the content of the results section, and also some information about figures and tables. Here is a link to the gorilla paper discussed in the video: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168159105004193 Here is a link to the tea paper discussed: http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/9630386
Views: 94344 Steve Kirk
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 495269 DiveIn Learning
How to Write a Literary Research Paper - Research Paper Writing Tips
 
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Please watch: "7 Lazy Weight Loss Hacks That Actually Work - Amazing Weight Loss Transformations" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5X2mLHybGS0 --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Research paper writing tips. Tips on how to write a literary research paper. English classes are typically required to write these pieces in order to engage their texts more fully. These pieces of writings usually vary in length, tone, and the style of research. Here's how to write a literary research paper. Literary research papers are documents that focus on examining poems, books, plays or short stories. Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 21642 WaysAndHow
How to write a good essay
 
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How to write an essay- brief essays and use the principles to expand to longer essays/ even a thesis you might also wish to check the video on Interview technique (now on this channel too!)
Views: 3297109 zontulfilmsltd
Improve your Writing: Show, Not Tell
 
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Become a better writer, no matter what you're writing! I'll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you'll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer. Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxjsWwgPjwM Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/ TRANSCRIPT Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it's going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. "Show, not tell. What's he talking about?" When we're writing we want to avoid simple statements that don't really add any description or flavour. For example: "The man was stressed." [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We're kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what's he doing? "The man was fidgeting. Ah, he's fidgeting. He's so stressed, he can't sort of stay still. And biting his nails." Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was. Next one: "The room was messy." Again, it's a simple, simple sentence. It's just one sort of main clause and it's not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: "There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn"... I'll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. "...and there were dirty plates and cups". Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy. Example three: "The woman was confident." Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? "She strode", that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I've picked an interesting verb. "She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her." Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident. Example four: "The boy was careful." Tell us how he was careful. "He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet." Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. "He placed"... There's no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: "the top drawer of his cabinet". Next example: "The stadium was full." Again, I'm bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. "The sound from the stadium was deafening", okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: "The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player's name." Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay? A couple of ones to describe weather. "It was hot." Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you're sort of a teenager or an adult, it's time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: "The sun was causing damage to", "The sun was melting", "The sun was burning", "The sun was causing the lady's skin to turn red". Okay? Pick out details that show the effect. "It was cold. It was cold." How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? "Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as"... I don't know. "It was three inches thick." Whatever, you've got to show details rather than just stating things. -"It was windy." -"The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella"-you know for keeping the rain off us-"was totally"-that means fully-"bent"-Yeah? Bent-"...out of shape", out of its normal position. "He found it funny." Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to... For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: "He was rolling around the floor in hysterics." Okay? When you're so... Find something so funny, you're like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can't control his body he finds it so funny. "Hysterics", that means like totally lost control. "Hysteria". Okay? Hysterics. "In hysterics" means finding something really, really funny. "The castle was captured." Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what's happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What's happening? "The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd." Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It's good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead? Thank you for watching today's video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I'll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.
How to Write a Articles easy and quickly   youtube
 
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How to Write a Articles easy and quickly How do you create an article How do you start to write an article How do you write a newspaper article How can we write How do you make a Wikipedia page How do I add an article to Wikipedia article writing samples how to write an article format how to write an article for a magazine how to write an article for a newspaper example of an article article writing format cbse article writing tips sample article
Views: 24 TOP Review
How To Prepare an Oral Research Presentation
 
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Learn how to prepare an oral presentation of your research! For more tips and advice visit urca.msu.edu
5 Tips For Writing An Awesome Blog Post
 
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Writing blog posts aren't hard. Follow these tactics and you can write an amazing blog post, fast. Subscribe here to learn more of my secret SEO tips: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=neilvkpatel Find me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neilkpatel/ Read more on my blog: https://neilpatel.com/blog/ Step #1: Take your time writing your first few blog posts - this will help you figure out what your readers like, your writing style, and the overall flow. Once you figure out your style you can templatize your blog posts. For example, mine are introduction, body, and conclusion. You also want to use headings, headings will make your content easier to read and skim. Within your headings, add keywords. Step #2: Add images - using services like Fotolia you can add images to every one of your blog posts. By adding images it makes your content easier to understand as some people are visual learners. Step #3: Set some rules - by following these rules it will make it easier to write blog posts faster. Make sure you use the words "you" and "I" within your blog. Add 7 or so images per post and keep your paragraphs shorter than 5 or 6 lines.
Views: 112027 Neil Patel
How To Write An Article Review
 
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This guide shows you How To Write An Article Review Watch This and Other Related films here: http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-critique-an-article Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=videojug Check Out Our Channel Page: http://www.youtube.com/user/videojug Like Us On Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/videojug Follow Us On Twitter! http://www.twitter.com/videojug
Views: 41427 Videojug
Making a better research poster
 
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8 tips for creating a great research poster for a conference, from the Poster Illustration team at AJE. Visit our Author Resource Center for publishing tips: https://www.aje.com/en/arc/. Learn about poster preparation for your research at: https://www.aje.com/us/services/posters.
How To Write A Research Paper Fast -  Research Paper Writing Tips
 
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Please watch: "7 Lazy Weight Loss Hacks That Actually Work - Amazing Weight Loss Transformations" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5X2mLHybGS0 --~-- http://www.waysandhow.com Subscribe to Waysandhow: https://goo.gl/RK2SbN Research paper writing tips, step by step tutorial and tips on how to write a research paper fast. Through the course of school, and sometimes your career, you have to write a research paper at one time or another. Usually you know enough about what to write; however, writing is seldom anyone's favorite way to spend time. In the pileup of work, writing often sinks to the bottom of priorities. At crunch time, you then need to double up in your efforts to make the deadline. Only the knowledge of how to write a research paper fast can save you. Waysandhow. ---------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Google+: https://plus.google.com/+waysandhow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waysandhow/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/waysandhow/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/waysandhow
Views: 517767 WaysAndHow
APA Literature Review
 
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Dr. Diane Gehart provides a brief overview for conducting an APA-style review of the literature. This lecture should help undergraduate and graduate students writing literature reviews get started. Also visit http://www.masteringcompetencies.com and http://www.dianegehart.com for more free resources.
Views: 92989 Diane R. Gehart, Ph.D.
Writing Skills: The Paragraph
 
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http://www.engvid.com The paragraph is the most important unit of a well-written essay. The paragraph has a specific structure and standards that make it effective and enjoyable to read. In this writing lesson we will look at how to construct good paragraphs and improve writing with better flow and clarity. After the lesson, take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-skills-paragraph/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, welcome again to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about the paragraph. It's a writing lesson, and I want to show people what a paragraph is and how to construct one, what to do, what not to do so you can write very clear, very tight paragraphs. This is especially important for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students but everybody has to follow the exact same rules. Now before I even begin, I must say that I'm talking mostly about academic writing or even business writing. Creative writing like novels or short stories, anything fiction, you can do anything you want. Only always remember: somebody has to read what you wrote so it has to be clear. But academic essays, for example, certain rules you have to follow; you have to be very careful about them. So let's begin. In terms of like the actual way a paragraph looks: you have to indent or skip a line. So let me just make sure you understand what an indent is. This is an indent, the first line a little bit pushed in or you can make sure you skip a line between paragraphs. But don't do both. If you skip a line, don't indent. Okay? That's the main thing. Now, that's in terms of the way it looks. In terms of content -- and this, I can't stress this enough -- very, very, very important: one central idea in one paragraph. Okay? I've seen many people, I've seen many essays where you start a paragraph talking about one thing, and then you go off on a tangent and talk about something completely unrelated. So for example: if you start a paragraph and you're talking about apples, continue to talk about apples. If you go to oranges, that's maybe okay because you're still talking about fruit. But if you start with apples, go to oranges, go to bananas, and then end up with monkeys in space there's a bit of a problem; the reader has no idea what you're talking about. One paragraph, one central idea. Now, make sure that you tell the reader what this central idea is. This is your thesis statement. Okay? It's a very general sentence. All it does is introduce the topic of the paragraph, nothing else. All the details comes after. So speaking of details, we'll talk about details in detail, but all other ideas, all the other sentences, all your sentences with the details must directly relate back to the main idea. So let's say here is your thesis statement; very general, every sentence after must relate back to that thesis statement. Okay? You can't go off to another idea. Everything must support this, must talk about the same topic. Very important. Okay? How long should your paragraph be? Technically, a paragraph could be one sentence, but in an academic essay that rarely happens. But it could be any length you want, as long as you're still on that one topic, as long as you still have things to write and things to say about that topic, say it. If you have four sentences, fine; if you have 10 sentences, also okay. Again, for IELTS, TOEFL, SAT students: four, five sentences should be your limit. You can't be too long because you don't have time and you're going to start making mistakes. So now, the details. Very important to have lots of details. Why is this topic important to your overall idea of your essay? Not only tell me what is the topic, what is the thesis statement of the paragraph, make sure you explain to me why this is important to the general idea of the essay. Give me your reasons. Now, why is it important? And then reasons, why you think what you're saying supports this idea. Examples, always use examples because giving me the reasons is okay; examples make me see exactly what you're trying to say. Very easy for me to understand what you're trying to say. Now, in terms of flow, in terms of the way the reader can approach the paragraph, you have to have bridges. What is, what do bridges mean? Basically, when you have one idea in this sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence, you must connect it to the next sentence. Every sentence must have a link to the next sentence. This creates flow, makes it much easier to read and understand, and it keeps you on the one topic. Now, key terms. If you're talking about something specific and you have to use a key term, use it as many times as you need to. Otherwise, avoid repetition. Try not to use the same word more than once in one paragraph. Okay? For example: if you're using the word "moreover" in the paragraph, don't use it, don't use "moreover" again -- use "in addition to", use "furthermore", "another", etc. Try to avoid using one word more than once, especially in the same paragraph.
Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students
 
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Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: (1) Gather the summaries of your sources. (2) Put the summaries in groups based on theme. (4) Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see: http://libguides.uwf.edu/c.php?g=215199&p=1420828
Views: 1085637 David Taylor
Creative Writing - 4 Easy Steps An Essay Writer Must Know!
 
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Creative Writing -http://www.singlishtoenglish.com/creative-writing/ - How to write with flair There are many different types of writing out there. For the purpose of this video, we will look at creative writing and the simple steps to take in writing a creative essay. What is creative writing? It is a broad statement that covers every form of narrative writing from poetry to feature articles in newspapers to novels - the list is endless. Loosely put, it excludes anything academic and technical. Let's look at how to write a creative essay: First step: Choose your subject. When choosing a subject, pick something you and others may find interesting. It may not have to be a subject that you know well, though that helps! If the subject is something you find interesting, but do not know much about, research it! That will be Step 2: All good writers research the background to their essay/story/novel, etc. If need be, talk to relevant authorities. Ask questions and learn more about the topic. Take some time and mull over your topic. Look at it from different perspectives. Write down all thoughts that occur to you on the subject, relevant or random, it does not matter. You can sift through it later and decide on what you want to use. You never know. You might end up with enough material for more than one essay. Onto the next step, Step 3, where you put down an outline of how, what, when, where and who your essay is all about. This will guide and keep you on the straight and narrow of the story without taking you down a meandering path. Then its time to flesh out these how, what, when, where and who questions as that will build the foundation of the story. Once you have the first 3 steps done, you can proceed to Step 4, writing the story. Using the outline you have set out, start with the introduction. In the introduction, the setting for the creative essay is established. Here is where you establish the place, time and scenery for the main subject of the essay. Next we come to the body of the essay. The plot of the essay is developed in the body. It can be made up of just one paragraph, in the case of a short story, or several paragraphs, when the story is longer. Each paragraph is to showcase one main idea. The movement from one paragraph to another has to be smooth and fluid without choppiness. This is where transitions come in useful. Briefly, transitions are words like 'yet', 'and', 'but' and so on. They allow the essay to flow seamlessly from one idea to another. They are usually used in the middle of a sentence. But, they can be used in the beginning to emphasise a point. I just did that. I used 'but' in the beginning of a sentence when it is usually used in the middle. This lays emphasis on the content of the sentence following the 'but' and shows the continuity of the thought process from the previous sentence. Just be careful not to over use transitions in your essay. Other transitions which we use all the time are words like 'however','also' and 'therefore'. There are many more transition words and I will get into grammar transitions more fully in another video. Finally, (there's a transition for you!) we come to the conclusion of the creative essay. The conclusion is where the whole plot comes together and is tidied up ...or not. That depends on you, the author, on how you want the essay to end. It can be neat and tidy, with a 'happily ever after' like fairy-tale ending or in can be a cliffhanger, where the ending is left shrouded in suspense. The ending or conclusion of your essay is important, so don't rush it or end it abruptly. It must leave a strong enough impact that the story remains in the reader's mind after he finishes reading it. Now that your creative essay is done, check it thoroughly for spelling and grammatical errors. Change whatever does not read or flow right. Think about the effect the essay will have on the reader. Ask someone else to proofread it for you. Very often we miss errors in our own writing that others will pick up. Once your essay is checked, proofread, corrected and checked again, it is done! Please leave me a comment. If you like this video, do share it with your family and friends and please subscribe to my channel. Check out my blog for tips to improve your English, http://www.singlishtoenglish.com. http://youtu.be/6Y2_oQobo_0 External tags: "creative writing", "essay writer", "essay writing", "how to write", "how to write an essay", "write my essay" http://youtu.be/6Y2_oQobo_0
Views: 275467 SinglishtoEnglish
How to write Notice - Tips of Notice Writing with format and a sample
 
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Notice Writing in English - Learn how to write a notice, correct format, tips & an example for classes VI-XII. For more examples view my blog https://www.teachinglearningwidpoornima.com/2018/05/notice-writing-what-is-notice-notice-is.html
How To Write A Research Proposal? 11 Things To Include In A Thesis Proposal
 
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This video talks about 11 factors which should be clarified in a research thesis proposal: topic, literature review, research questions, sample, instrument, procedure, and so on... Related videos on this topic are listed below. ▼▼▼ Examples of Causal, Correlational, Descriptive, and Exploratory Research Questions. https://youtu.be/oqdItyBSKSs Research aim, research objective, research question, and investigative question. https://youtu.be/ujKIM59hy9I Research types, research designs, data collection, and sampling. https://youtu.be/WY9j_t570LY What is a good Central Research Question? https://youtu.be/I4MfCDy7wDw When to use a qualitative research design? Four things to consider. https://youtu.be/4FJPNStnTvA Please LIKE this video if you enjoyed it. Otherwise, there is a thumb-down button, too... :P ▶ Please SUBSCRIBE to see new videos (almost) every week! ◀ ▼MY SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES▼ https://www.facebook.com/ranywayz https://nl.linkedin.com/in/ranywayz https://www.twitter.com/ranywayz Animations are made with Sparkol. Music files retrieved from YouTube Audio Library. All images used in this video are free stock images or are available in the public domain. The views expressed in this video are my own and do not necessarily reflect the organizations with which I am affiliated. The content of this video is presented as general information only. The creator of this video takes no responsibility for how the information presented in this video is interpreted or used by others. The creator of this video is in no event liable for damages of any kind incurred or suffered as a result of the use or non-use of the information presented in this video or the use of defective or incomplete information as contained in this video. #ResearchProposal #ThesisProposal #Dissertation #RanywayzRandom
Views: 117200 Ranywayz Random
Research Questions Hypothesis and Variables
 
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This lesson discusses the relationships of research questions, hypothesis, and variables in a research study proposal. Dr. Wallace is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at American Military University.
Views: 177941 Ron Wallace
How to write a hook
 
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Learn how to write a hook (attention-getting intro) for an essay. Video includes 5 kinds of hooks: inverted pyramid, fact/statistic, anecdote/personal experience, rhetorical question, and bold pronouncement. Also included are 3 hooks to avoid. Twitter @mistersato411
Views: 672859 mistersato411
Theoretical Framework
 
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A short introduction to theoretical frameworks and how to approach constructing one
Views: 239020 Francois J. Desjardins
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
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https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 829666 Kevin deLaplante
13 Uses of 'THE' - Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 2 - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, you will learn the 13 USES of THE. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Welcome back. This is lesson two of my series on articles. If you haven’t seen the first lesson, you will find the link to the full playlist below. Alright, in this lesson, I will show you 13 uses of the definite article – ‘the’. As always, there’s a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Use number one is something we discussed in the previous lesson. This is also the most important use. Use 'the' to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, "Julie has a nine-year-old son. The boy wants to be an astronaut." Here, I first say 'a nine-year old son' because you don't know him yet. But once I have introduced him in the sentence, I then say 'The boy' because he is now known to you. Here's another example: "Can you answer the phone?" If I say this to you, then there's probably a phone ringing somewhere. So the phone is already known to you, and I say 'the phone'. And finally, "This is the watch that my sister gave me for my birthday." This example is a little different because if I stop with "This is the watch" - you will be confused because you don't know the watch. But then if I give you more information about the watch - it's the watch that my sister gave me for my birthday - so that way it becomes known to you. Let's now move on to use number two: use 'the' with unique things – that is, where there is only one of something. For example, we say ‘the sun’ (because there’s only one sun). Similarly, ‘the moon’, ‘the sky’, ‘the world’, ‘the universe’ and so on. Here are a couple of sentences: "Everyone knows that the sun rises in the east." and "Rahul has traveled all over the world." Some other things we consider unique are ‘the government’, 'the police', 'the Internet' and so on. As in these sentences: “The police are investigating a murder in our neighborhood.” and “Almost everybody uses the Internet today.” OK the next use is with some words referring to nature or the environment in a general way. These are words such as the countryside (which means rural or village areas), the town, the mountains, the weather etc. For example, "My son enjoys spending time in the countryside." It means my son likes to spend time relaxing in rural areas. Here are a couple more sentences: "We're going to take a trip to the mountains." and "I love the weather in Los Angeles." Use number four is talking about objects of common experience like in the expressions that you see on the screen. We say that these are objects of common experience because we all experience these in our lives. Have a look at this example: "I met an interesting man at the park yesterday." You may not know which park but it doesn't matter - the park is common experience. In the same way "Did you read the newspaper this morning?" I don't care which newspaper you read, I just want to know if read one today. Here's another example: "Darren likes to sing in the shower." We also use 'the ' with some types of media (including the word 'media' itself) and also forms of entertainment. For example, "I don't listen to the radio a lot these days." or “Pooja is at the movies with her friends." Note that 'at the movies' means at a movie theatre. But it's important to note that TV doesn't work this way. You can use 'the' with TV if you mean a television set. Like "Will you help me move the TV?" But if you mean television as a medium, then you say 'on TV' - as in "I saw a documentary on TV today." Not 'on the TV'. It's just a crazy rule in English. Let's move on to use number five now. Use 'the' with some time expressions. You see these on the screen - we always use 'the' in these expressions. For example, "Kids hate getting up early in the morning.", "A friend of mine got married the day before yesterday." and "We love to go swimming in the summer." We also say ‘the past’, ‘the present’ and ‘the future’ probably because there's only one past, present and future. Like in this sentence: "We must learn our lessons from the past and work towards the future." 'The' is also found in time expressions like ‘the eighteenth century’, 'the 1960s' (or simply 'the 60s') and so on. For example, "This house was built by my grandfather in the sixties." Now you have to be a little careful with time expressions because there are many that should be used without articles. You see some of these on the screen. We will discuss these more in the next lesson when we talk about where to use no article. The next use is superlative forms. These are expressions like ‘the best’, ‘the worst’, ‘the biggest’, ‘the smallest’ and so on.
Views: 236460 Learn English Lab
English Lesson: Learn Report Writing
 
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Find 1500+ education videos available at http://www.youtube.com/user/IkenEdu Writing is an integral part of this advanced era. You have to be good in writing emails, applications, reports etc. In this English Lesson video, you will learn how to write Reports. Report writing has certain rules and regulations. Watch the video and learn all the rules. Don't miss to share the video with your friends and classmates to help them learn the same!
Views: 484299 Iken Edu
How to create an outline for your research paper
 
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What is the first step of research paper writing? Preparing an outline for the paper. If you have a research outline ready before writing, you will be able to effectively organize and present all the information and ideas you collected during your research. A research outline will also help you write in a clear, organized manner without missing anything. This video shows you how you can create an outline for a research paper that follows an IMRAD (Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Conclusion) structure. For more manuscript writing and submission tips, visit: . Visit Editage Insights today: http://www.editage.com/insights/tips-on-effective-use-of-tables-and-figures-in-research-papers
Views: 181220 Editage Insights
MLA In-Text Citations (Step-by-Step Guide)
 
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If you're confused on how to cite sources in research papers, you're not alone! Check out this video for a step-by-step guide on using MLA source citation within your paper.
Views: 557611 HSLanguageArts
Critical Appraisal of a Qualitative Study
 
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MPH by Elearning Unit 5b How Good is the Evidence? Is it Acceptable? ScHARR, University of Sheffield, UK
Views: 75897 Andrew Booth
How to write a thesis for beginners
 
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The basics of writing a thesis statement or introduction sentence. Check out the easybib.com tutorial for works cited page help. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPOl9lWEUcY
Views: 1111632 Andrew
Writing Tips & Teaching Strategies : How to Write a Good Article Summary
 
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A good article summary has a first sentence that encapsulates the article, examples referencing earlier points, and finally a call to action. Write an article summary that helps to put the article in perspective with tips from a writing instructor in this free video on writing lessons. Expert: Laura Minnigerode Contact: www.youngwritersworkshops.com Bio: Laura Minnigerode is a writing instructor and former classroom teacher. Filmmaker: Todd Green
Views: 19102 eHow
Report Writing
 
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This video lecture explains how to put a report together as an assignment, and focuses on the elements which are required in a good report.
Views: 668415 Massey University
How to Write an Argumentative Essay - Planning
 
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Introducing the British Council’s How to Write an Argumentative Essay animated video series. This is the first of five simple and easy to follow videos that will show you how you can improve your writing. We will look at: • Planning and question analysis • Writing a paragraph • Introduction and conclusion • Counter paragraph • Editing The British Council is committed to sharing our expertise in English language learning. This series is a comprehensive online tuition guide, taking you through all the key elements you need for a good piece of argumentative essay writing. This series is particularly relevant to secondary school students struggling with their English curriculum. For more information on our courses, check out our website http://www.britishcouncil.sg/english/courses-secondary or use our other free resources at learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org. Alternatively, to speak to one of our customer service advisors, please contact us at: Napier Road Centre +65 6653 6042 Marsiling Centre +65 6653 6044 Tampines Centre +65 6653 6063 Toa Payoh Centre +65 6653 6045 You can also follow us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/BritishCouncilSingapore), or Twitter (@sgBritish). Enjoy the videos!
Views: 433854 britishcouncilsg
How to Integrate Quotations In Writing Essays-APA or MLA
 
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Three simple tips for integrating quotations into your essay writing--APA and MLA research papers, theses, dissertations.
Views: 126478 David Taylor
Formal Letter Writing | CBSE Official Letters | Writing Applications | Sample Letters
 
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Formal Letter Writing | CBSE Schools | Writing Official Letters | Writing Applications | Sample Letters by The English Academy This video teaches you on Formal letter Writing as per CBSE Syllabus. Also included in this lesson is a Sample letter explaining how to write formal letters and applications and letters of complaints Also See our website https://www.successcds.net Follow us: http://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD http://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam https://twitter.com/successcds http://www.youtube.com/successcds1 http://www.youtube.com/englishacademy1
Views: 1506137 English Academy
Creating an APA Format Annotated Bibliography
 
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*Please note a verbal error in this video regarding serif v. sans serif fonts. Times New Roman is a SERIF font. Arial or calibri are examples of sans serif fonts. This is a brief screencast of creating an APA format Annotated Bibliography. It includes how to locate information in an article to create an APA citation and the layout of an APA formatted annotated bibliography. Web resource: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/res...
Views: 470313 Raechel Soicher
Developing a Research Question
 
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This video is part of a series created for students enrolled in a 291W course at NKU. -- Created using PowToon This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Views: 356859 Steely Library NKU
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
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"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 564497 David Taylor
How to Create an Infographic - Part 1: What Makes a Good Infographic?
 
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This is Part I of the Beginner's Guide to Creating Shareable Infographics, where I show you what makes a good infographic by providing you real life examples and how each tells a story, are well structures and add practical value, hence making them highly shareable and engaging to the viewer. This video series is based on the free eBook that will help you understand and create better Infographics: blog.visme.co/how-to-make-an-infographic/ Sources for images: https://blog.toggl.com/2015/09/airport-hacks-infographic/ https://www.angieslist.com/articles/5-myths-about-your-digestive-system.htm http://visual.ly/what-are-odds https://www.good.is/infographics/the-three-trillion-dollar-war-its-cost-in-ten-steps https://ziploc.com/en/recipes/tips-and-tricks/5-instant-ramen-recipe-upgrades https://creativemarket.com/blog/12-free-ways-to-learn-design http://www.icecream.com/icecreaminfo http://blog.visme.co/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/coffee.jpg http://blog.samuel-windsor.co.uk/mens-dress-code-infographic http://visual.ly/airports-near-port-canaveral http://thumbnails-visually.netdna-ssl.com/TheWorldas100People_519247ce0980d_w1500.png https://techcrunch.com/2009/04/06/great-visualization-web-trends-map-4-final-beta/ https://www.behance.net/gallery/16995453/Save-The-Animals-Infographic-Series http://www.whalefacts.org/whale-infographic/ http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/fast-food http://lifehacker.com/5895525/are-bananas-as-bad-for-you-as-cookies-which-foods-to-eat-to-keep-you-full-and-not-crash-later http://www.visualistan.com/2016/11/how-to-be-more-creative-infographic.html http://www.whalefacts.org/whale-infographic/
Views: 193671 visme
Cambridge English: Proficiency -- Teaching Tips for Writing
 
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The webinar will focus on the new compulsory essay question in Part 1 of the Writing paper. The presenter will discuss the requirements of the task, including assessment, and tips to help teachers prepare learners for this part of the exam. Ron Zeronis, Assessment Group Manager, will be answering questions that relate to the content of the presentation at the end of the webinar. Presenters - Jill Buggey & Ron Zeronis The link to the handout is below: http://assets.cambridgeenglish.org/webinars/cpe-compulsory-essay.pdf The link to the slides is below: http://assets.cambridgeenglish.org/webinars/cpe-compulsory-essay-slides.pdf
Views: 75832 Cambridge English
How to write a comparative thesis statement
 
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This video builds off of my previous video on writing a single-text-analysis thesis. You can find that previous video here: https://youtu.be/ReIBSuoCUgU
How to Identify Fact vs. Opinion in Writing & Research
 
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This video explains how the quality of your paper may change based on whether your use facts or opinions, and tips for detecting opinion or bias in writing.
Views: 46730 Imagine Easy Solutions
How to write an Abstract: Some useful tips
 
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First impressions are always important, and in the case of your research paper, it is the abstract that the reader gets to see first. Hence it is important to know how to write the perfect abstract. This video explains the purpose of an abstract, and provides some useful tips to help you write the most effective abstract for your paper.
Views: 138555 Editage Insights
11. How to write  journal or conference paper using templates in MS Word 2007?
 
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Md Aktaruzzaman Assistant Professor, IUT, Gazipur, Bangladesh PhD Student, Monash Uni, Melbourne, Australia
Views: 40931 akhtariut