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U.S.: Military Committed to Afghan Strategy
 
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The U.S. admits things are tense in Afghanistan after days of protest and deadly violence, but it's vowing to keep carrying out its mission. (Feb 27) Subscribe to the Associated Press: http://bit.ly/APYouTube Download AP Mobile: http://www.ap.org/mobile/ Associated Press on Facebook: http://apne.ws/c7lQTV Associated Press on Twitter: http://apne.ws/bTquhb Associated Press on Google+: http://bit.ly/zuTKBL
Views: 964 Associated Press
Obama's new strategy in Afghanistan
 
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U.S. President Barack Obama pledges to send four thousand military instructors to Afghanistan and urges the people of Pakistan to unite to drive Al-Qaeda from the region.
Views: 4420 RT
U.S. Strategy on Afghanistan
 
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Speaker: John F. Kerry, Chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate (D-MA) Presider: David E. Sanger, Chief Washington Correspondent, The New York Times (Oct 26, 2009 at the Council on Foreign Relations)
Views: 255 UChannel
New Strategy For Afghanistan
 
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Since Jan.1, 11 Americans have been killed in Afghanistan compared to 8 in Iraq, and the need for more U.S. troops is increasing. As Elizabeth Palmer reports, the war in Afghanistan is worsening.
Views: 641 CBS News
Is the USA losing AFGHANISTAN? - VisualPolitik EN
 
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Sixteen long years of conflict, occupation, and hundreds of billions of dollars later and it would seem logical to think that the US and NATO could have managed to have the situation under control and Afghanistan would be close to reaching peace, right? Well... Nothing is closer to reality. The truth is that each day that goes by, the Taliban regain ground. Today, we'll talk about Afghanistan. And don't forget to visit our friend’s podcast, Reconsider Media: http://www.reconsidermedia.com/
Views: 223792 VisualPolitik EN
The Struggle for a Strategy in Afghanistan
 
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A rift appears to be emerging among U.S. President Barack Obama's closest advisers on the question of strategy for the war in Afghanistan, STRATFOR analyst Peter Zeihan explains. Meanwhile, North Korea agrees to return to nuclear talks. What comes next from Pyongyang? About Stratfor: Stratfor brings global events into valuable perspective, empowering businesses, governments and individuals to more confidently navigate their way through an increasingly complex international environment. For individual and enterprise subscriptions to Stratfor Worldview, our online publication, visit us at: https://worldview.stratfor.com/ And make sure to connect with Stratfor on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/stratfor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stratfor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/stratfor YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/stratfor Learn more about Stratfor here: https://www.Stratfor.com Get the latest company news here: https://marcom.stratfor.com/horizons Or review and purchase our longform reports on geopolitics here: https://store.stratfor.com And listen to the Stratfor podcast for free here: iTunes - http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Podcast_iTunes Stitcher - http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/stratfor-talks Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/stratfortalks Libsyn - http://stratfor.libsyn.com/ Download the All New Mobile App for Stratfor. You can also access Stratfor Worldview Content in the App when you are offline. Free Download for iOS (from Apple App Store): http://bit.ly/Statfor_Mobile_App_for_Apple_Devices Free Download for Android (from Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/Stratfor_Mobile_App_for_Android_Devices To subscribe to Stratfor Worldview, click here: https://worldview.stratfor.com/subscribe Join Stratfor Worldview to cut through the noise and make sense of an increasingly complicated world. Membership to Stratfor Worldview includes: Unrestricted access to Stratfor Worldview's latest insights, podcasts, videos, and more. Members-only community forums. My Collections - your personal library of Stratfor insights saved for later reading. Discounts to our long-form reports on the Stratfor Store.
Views: 2839 Stratfor
U.S. Policy in Iraq & Afghanistan: John Nagl
 
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ASP hosted a lively discussion on the lessons and legacies of U.S. policy in Afghanistan and Iraq - based on issues contained in a recently published book. Moderators: Seyom Brown and Robert H. Scales Co-Editors of the eponymous book Panel Participants & Chapter Authors: Stephen Biddle is senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. A member of the Defense Policy Board, he has served on strategic and military assessment teams for the U.S. Commands in Iraq and Afghanistan. His book Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle has won several major prizes. Seyom Brown, currently on research leave, is the Tower Chair in International Politics & National Security at Southern Methodist University, and senior advisor to the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Brown has held senior research and analysis positions at several policy think tanks. The most recent of his twelve books are Higher Realism: A New Foreign Policy for the United States and The Illusion of Control: Force and Foreign Policy in the 21st Century. Dan Caldwell is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He has served on the faculties of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterrey, Brown, UCLA and Harvard. He is the author and editor of numerous books, including Vortex of Conflict: U.S Policy Toward Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq. Vanda Felbab-Brown is Fellow in Foreign Policy and the 21st Century Defense Initiative at the Brookings Institution. Her research focuses on the interactions among illicit economies, criminal organizations, and armed conflict. She is the author of Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs and numerous policy monographs. John Nagl, former president of the Center for a New American Security, is a research fellow at the U.S. Naval Academy. A veteran of both Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom, Nagl, along with Gen. David Petraeus and others, was a principal on the writing team for the 2006 U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual. Michael O'Hanlon is director of research and senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution. A frequent media and op-ed commentator on national security issues, he is the author of Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era and The Wounded Giant. Linda Robinson is a scholarly journalist and consultant on political conflict, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and has reported extensively from the field in Iraq and Afghanistan. An adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, she is author of Tell Me How This Ends: General Petraeus and the Search for a Way out of Iraq. She is writing a book on Afghanistan that will be published in 2013. MG Robert H. Scales (ret), is President of Colgen, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in military affairs & strategy. Scales is a former Commandant for the U.S. Army War College and held command & staff positions inn the U.S., Germany, Korea and VietNam. He is the author of numerous books on contemporary and future warfare, including Yellow Smoke: The Future of Land Warfare for America's Military. Marvin Weinbaum is a scholar in residence at the Middle East Institute. An expert on Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, and Turkey, he was an analyst in the U.S. Dept of State's Bureau of Intelligence & Research.
U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan: Report of a CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force
 
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ORIGINALLY RECORDED December 16, 2010 Experts discuss the findings and recommendations of the Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan including nation building techniques, possible withdrawal strategies, and how to combat corruption, in addition to discussing the Obama administration's most recent Afghan strategy review. SPEAKERS: James Dobbins, Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center, National Security Research Division, RAND Corporation; Member, Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan Robert Grenier, Chairman, ERG Partners; Member, Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan Daniel Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations; Director, Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan PRESIDER: Leslie H. Gelb, President Emeritus, Council on Foreign Relations http://www.cfr.org/pakistan/us-strategy-pakistan-afghanistan-report-cfr-sponsored-independent-task-force-video/p23645
Squad Movement Formations & Techniques
 
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This video describes and provides employment recommendations for Squad Movement Formations & Squad Movement Techniques
Views: 431403 OEC G&V
Osama Bin Laden's Driver -  US Interrogation techniques in action first time released!!
 
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People say so much about US interrogation tecniques, well here it is in action. Listen, watch and learn how "terrible" we are. First ever released footage of an interrogation in the field in Afghanistan. Hamdan was captured in southern Afghanistan on November 24, 2001. According to documents obtained by the Associated Press, he was captured in a car with four other alleged al-Qaeda associates, including Osama bin laden's son-in-law, three of whom were killed in a firefight with Afghan forces. Hamdan and the other surviving associate in the car were later turned over to U.S. forces. ATTENTION!! We are moving! Because of YouTube's new policy against military related videos and on where advertisers are allowed to put their Ads, we must move our videos. Join us at our new home! WWW.USMILITARYVIDEOS.NET! You will find videos and photos not found here on YouTube!! Plus forums to discuss all things military related! You can even post your thoughts there! Plus Sports, Outdoors, Snipers Hide, Shooting, Hunting and Fishing pages! Questions or comments email [email protected] Want to win $5000 worth of ammo!?!?!? Thought that would get your attention! Here at US Military Videos & Photos we have partnered with USCCA (United States Concealed Carry Association) to bring you this great chance at some great benefits! Our founder and owner, Chris Wagoner, is a life member of USCCA and believes in it completely! Why listen to him you say? Because he is a 33 year+ cop and police firearms instructor. He knows firearms! USCCA is a great association that is designed to protect and educate the armed citizen! If you are thinking of carrying a firearm for self-protection, already carry one, have firearms in your home or know someone that does, this is for you! USCCA provides education through its training courses, DVD’s and books. Online resources are first class and very well done. The USCCA magazine “Concealed Carry” is full of great tips, gear reviews, and legal information every responsible gun owner should know. If that was all they did that would be enough to check them out, but what is one of the best benefits is that they will provide legal protection for you if you are involved in that life and death incident where you use your firearm for self-defense! That’s right they have insurance for your firearms and also will provide legal counsel if you need them because of a shooting incident. That alone is worth the membership fees! The piece of mind of knowing you are protected by USCCA in that time of chaos and emotional turmoil is worth it. So what do you have to do to get in on this $5000 ammo give away and check out the fantastic benefits of USCCA? Just click here - http://goo.gl/mMwJWd . Did we mention there would be 5 winners not just 1? 120,000 members can’t be wrong. Want to win $5000 worth of ammo!?!?!? Thought that would get your attention! Here at US Military Videos & Photos we have partnered with USCCA (United States Concealed Carry Association) to bring you this great chance at some great benefits! Our founder and owner, Chris Wagoner, is a life member of USCCA and believes in it completely! Why listen to him you say? Because he is a 33 year+ cop and police firearms instructor. He knows firearms! USCCA is a great association that is designed to protect and educate the armed citizen! If you are thinking of carrying a firearm for self-protection, already carry one, have firearms in your home or know someone that does, this is for you! USCCA provides education through its training courses, DVD’s and books. Online resources are first class and very well done. The USCCA magazine “Concealed Carry” is full of great tips, gear reviews, and legal information every responsible gun owner should know. If that was all they did that would be enough to check them out, but what is one of the best benefits is that they will provide legal protection for you if you are involved in that life and death incident where you use your firearm for self-defense! That’s right they have insurance for your firearms and also will provide legal counsel if you need them because of a shooting incident. That alone is worth the membership fees! The piece of mind of knowing you are protected by USCCA in that time of chaos and emotional turmoil is worth it. So what do you have to do to get in on this $5000 ammo give away and check out the fantastic benefits of USCCA? Just click here - http://goo.gl/mMwJWd . Did we mention there would be 5 winners not just 1? 120,000 members can’t be wrong.
Views: 2145753 US Military Videos
Behind The Taliban Mask: The Other Side Of Afghanistan's Front-line (2010)
 
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Taliban - Behind the Masks (2010): A daring journalist gains unprecedented access to the Taliban in Afghanistan. For similar stories see: Al Qaeda's Fight In Afghanistan https://youtu.be/4kBMyaIzoe0 Why Are Kurds Joining Up With ISIS? https://youtu.be/Q2X7eP6d0ME The Children Brainwashed To Become Jihadis https://youtu.be/kAYHAovJy84 Though they would eventually kidnap him, the Taliban granted journalist Paul Refsdal unprecedented access. This exclusive documentary shows us a side of the Taliban that we have never seen before. Subscribe to journeyman for daily uploads: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For downloads and more information: http://www.journeyman.tv/?lid=60920 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews Paul Refsdal - Ref. 4876 Every week Journeyman offers a brand new documentary, fresh out of the cutting room. They're award winning documentaries, some destined for the festival circuit and some for broadcast. The one thing you can know is that here you get to see them when they're fresh, often before they appear anywhere else. To watch them in full go to our VOD platform at http://jman.TV
Views: 4197545 Journeyman Pictures
Walid Phares: US Strategy in the Middle East Till 2020: Will It Work?
 
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Transcript: https://bit.ly/2GretQT Playlist: https://bit.ly/2LDT90h Twitter: https://bit.ly/2JcYJVz Facebook: https://bit.ly/2HedS6x Dr. Walid Phares, who served as a foreign policy adviser to Donald Trump and Mitt Romney and is Fox News national security expert, will assess US policy towards the Greater Middle East from Afghanistan to Libya, with insights into major crises in Iran, Iraq, Syria, Yemen, Gulf and Turkey. Dr. Phares is an engaging and highly sought after Middle East expert and pacesetter, often predicting trends and situations on the ground years before they occur. He is a Fox News Expert, advisor to the US Congress and the European Parliament and served as a senior advisor on national security foreign policy to presidential candidate Mitt Romney 2012. Dr Phares is the only expert/author who predicted the Arab Spring a year before it occurred in his pacesetting book, The Coming Revolution: Struggle for Freedom in the Middle East (Threshold, a division of Simon and Shuster 2010). Dr Phares holds an extensive CV and noteworthy achievements in the fields of academia, government strategies, media and publishing critical advice on combatting terrorism and countering jihadi radicalization both stateside and abroad. Dr Phares holds a Ph.D in international relations and strategic studies from the University of Miami, and a Political Science Degree from St Joseph University and a Law degree from the Lebanese University in Beirut and a Master in International Law from Universite' Jean Moulin in Lyons, France. Dr Phares taught political science and Middle East studies at Florida Atlantic University between 1993 and 2004. Since 2006, he taught Global Jihadi strategies at the National Defense University in Washington DC. Dr Phares lectures on campuses nationwide and internationally, including at the US Intelligence University. He lectured at Georgetown University, George Washington University, American University, Columbia, University of Chicago, Pepperdine, Boston College, Brandeis, UC Berkley, University of Colorado at Boulder, Loyola New Orleans, UC Santa Barbara, and many others including Ecole Militaire of France in Paris. Dr Phares lectures also to various academic associations including the Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa in Washington DC and Middle East American ethnic organizations. After having authored six books on Middle East politics and history (in Arabic) in the 1980s, Dr Phares authored another five in English stateside since the mid 1990s. His most important volumes were published after 9/11 starting with Future Jihad: Terrorist Strategies against America, (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005) and a critically acclaimed book that was ranked in the top ten books of the 2006 Foreign Affairs List. Future Jihad was read and cited by many members of Congress and the European Parliament. Dr Phares predicted the rise of jihadi urban networks and set forth strategies to counter them in the West and overseas. Dr Phares published two more books on global strategies: The War of Ideas (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008) explaining the ideological indoctrination and The Confrontation, a policy strategy book designed to isolate radicals. Media and colleagues alike rave about Phares's hallmark book, which predicted the Arab Spring a year before it occurred: The Coming Revolution: Struggle for Freedom in the Middle East (Simon and Shuster, 2010). The book was endorsed by US Presidential candidate Mitt Romney, and praised by many leading figures in Congress, political circles and media on both sides of the Atlantic. Dr Walid Phares is a native of Beirut, Lebanon, and immigrated to the United States in 1990. He speaks fluent Arabic and French as well as English. Prior to moving stateside, Dr Phares was a student union leader, a lawyer, a publisher, a university professor, and founded a social-democratic party, which he represented in several political coalitions. #foreignpolicy #nationalsecurity #defense
Views: 7231 WestminsterInstitute
U.S. Strategy on Afghanistan: Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School
 
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Professor and moderator, Robert Mnookin, Chair of the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, addresses The Longest War: Challenges and Negotiation Strategies in Afghanistan. Joining him on the panel was Hassina Sherjan, Afghan Entrepreneur, Activist and Mid-Career Master in Public Administration Candidate at Harvard's Kennedy School. She is also co-author of the book, "Toughing It Out In Afghanistan." Also participating on the panel was her co-author, Michael O'Hanlon, senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. For more videos on Afghanistan, please visit, Corcoran Productions, http://corcoranproductions.com/
Views: 923 jay corcoran
US Military Remains Optimistic About Afghanistan
 
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As the battle for control of Kandahar Province continues, efforts at reconciliation are also moving ahead. President Obama plans, by December, to reassess his strategy, based on progress made in breaking the back of the Taliban at least in Kandahar. While the U.S. military remains optimistic, some analysts say the optimism should be tempered based on what they saw on the ground
Views: 390 VOA News
Video: The Transition in Afghanistan
 
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Last month, President Obama announced a plan to begin drawing down U.S. forces in Afghanistan with a goal to complete the transition of security responsibility to the Afghan government by 2014. But while the administration has outlined a plan to reduce America's military commitment in Afghanistan, it has yet to outline a viable endstate for the country that includes desired political and economic outcomes. Nor has it explained how its Afghanistan and Pakistan strategies fit together. In short, the Obama administration has left critical blanks unfilled in its overall strategy for Afghanistan and the broader region. To improve its policy, the administration needs to clarify key issues on political, diplomatic, and economic fronts. Despite rhetoric supportive of national reconciliation and the articulation of redlines, there is no clear indication of what sort of political outcome the United States would find acceptable in Afghanistan and how the military strategy helps get from the current political situation to the desired endstate. Similarly, the United States continues to make unsustainable investments on the economic front in support of its military strategy. The Afghan army, for example, will be financially viable only with external support if it grows to levels U.S. military commanders believe are necessary for it to take over security responsibility from NATO. What's more, deteriorating relations between the United States and Pakistan throw into question how our strategies for Kabul and Islamabad fit together. Without greater clarity on overall objectives and coordination between the military, political, and economic tracks of our Afghanistan strategy, a transition of greater responsibility to the Afghan government will remain continually out of reach. The absence of a unified strategy aimed at clear, realistic end goals also increases the risk of state collapse and civil war as the United States and its allies draw down their forces in Afghanistan.
Views: 322 seeprogress
16 Years of US presence in Afghanistan: Objectives, Strategies and Emerging Scenario
 
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The session ‘16 Years of US Presence in Afghanistan: Objectives, Strategies and Emerging Scenario’, held on October 5, 2017 at IPS, was addressed by Rahimullah Yusufzai, veteran journalist and analyst on Afghan affairs, Ambassador (r) Mohammad Sadiq, former secretary, National Security Division and Executive President IPS Khalid Rahman. The session was attended by a number of analysts, researchers, diplomats and officials of concerned government departments and state institutions. http://www.ips.org.pk/16-years-us-presence-afghanistan/
U.S. Policy in Iraq & Afghanistan: Seyom Brown
 
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ASP hosted a lively discussion on the lessons and legacies of U.S. policy in Afghanistan and Iraq - based on issues contained in a recently published book. Moderators: Seyom Brown and Robert H. Scales Co-Editors of the eponymous book Panel Participants & Chapter Authors: Stephen Biddle is senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. A member of the Defense Policy Board, he has served on strategic and military assessment teams for the U.S. Commands in Iraq and Afghanistan. His book Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle has won several major prizes. Seyom Brown, currently on research leave, is the Tower Chair in International Politics & National Security at Southern Methodist University, and senior advisor to the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Brown has held senior research and analysis positions at several policy think tanks. The most recent of his twelve books are Higher Realism: A New Foreign Policy for the United States and The Illusion of Control: Force and Foreign Policy in the 21st Century. Dan Caldwell is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He has served on the faculties of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterrey, Brown, UCLA and Harvard. He is the author and editor of numerous books, including Vortex of Conflict: U.S Policy Toward Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq. Vanda Felbab-Brown is Fellow in Foreign Policy and the 21st Century Defense Initiative at the Brookings Institution. Her research focuses on the interactions among illicit economies, criminal organizations, and armed conflict. She is the author of Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs and numerous policy monographs. John Nagl, former president of the Center for a New American Security, is a research fellow at the U.S. Naval Academy. A veteran of both Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom, Nagl, along with Gen. David Petraeus and others, was a principal on the writing team for the 2006 U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual. Michael O'Hanlon is director of research and senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution. A frequent media and op-ed commentator on national security issues, he is the author of Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era and The Wounded Giant. Linda Robinson is a scholarly journalist and consultant on political conflict, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and has reported extensively from the field in Iraq and Afghanistan. An adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, she is author of Tell Me How This Ends: General Petraeus and the Search for a Way out of Iraq. She is writing a book on Afghanistan that will be published in 2013. MG Robert H. Scales (ret), is President of Colgen, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in military affairs & strategy. Scales is a former Commandant for the U.S. Army War College and held command & staff positions inn the U.S., Germany, Korea and VietNam. He is the author of numerous books on contemporary and future warfare, including Yellow Smoke: The Future of Land Warfare for America's Military. Marvin Weinbaum is a scholar in residence at the Middle East Institute. An expert on Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, and Turkey, he was an analyst in the U.S. Dept of State's Bureau of Intelligence & Research.
US & Afghan forces discuss combined mission strategies
 
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This edition features a story on U.S. and Afghan forces preparing for a combined mission as part of Operation Mountain Fire in Afghanistan.
Views: 30 natoisaf
Afghanistan: Endless War?
 
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Panelists look at America's longest war and examine strategies for how to bring it to an end. This is Session II of The Future of the Middle East symposium. This event is made possible by the generous support of the Hauser Foundation. Speakers Alyssa Ayres Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations; Author, Our Times Has Come: How India is Making Its Place in the World Carlotta Gall Istanbul Bureau Chief, New York Times Cameron P. Munter Chief Executive Officer and President, East-West Institute; Former U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan (2010-2012) Presider Barney Rubin Senior Fellow and Associate Director, Center on International Cooperation, NYU; Former Senior Adviser to the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, U.S. Department of State Subscribe to our channel: https://goo.gl/WCYsH7 The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher. Visit the CFR website: http://www.cfr.org Follow CFR on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cfr_org Follow CFR on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/councilonforeignrelations/
Can the U.S. Withdraw from Afghanistan and Iraq? Part 1 of 4
 
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Held on 12/09/09. An Independent Policy Forum, as featured on C-SPAN 2 Book TV. Independent Institute Senior Fellow Ivan Eland discusses strategies and reasons for U.S. withdrawal from Iraq and Afghanistan.
Dr. Sreeram Chaulia on American & Indian strategies in Afghanistan
 
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Contradictions in Donald Trump administration's new "conditions-based" policy on Afghanistan and South Asia; uncertainty about long-term American vision for Asia; Rex Tillerson's criticism of Pakistan's sponsorship of terrorism; Iran factor in India-US coordination to stabilise Afghanistan; Ashraf Ghani's chastening and refusal to join the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC); need for India to do social and political nation-building in Afghanistan, over and above infrastructure development.
Views: 59 jsiamedia
"Modern War in Theory and Practice" presented by Dr. John A. Nagl
 
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Dr. John A. Nagl lectures at the 31st Annual Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz Lecture Series. Dr. Nagl served as an Armor Officer in the US Army for 20 years and is one of the most influential US military officers of his generation. He was heavily involved in the adoption of a counterinsurgency strategy in Iraq and Afghanistan in the mid-2000s. He also appeared on The Daily Show. Dr. Nagl graduated with distinction from West Point with the class of 1988 and received his masters degree from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. He served as a tank platoon commander during the First Gulf War. Recognizing the changing nature of warfare, he returned to Oxford to pursue a PhD. His dissertation, entitled Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife: Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam, became one of the fundamental academic texts used to argue for a change in US policy in Iraq and Afghanistan. In the mid-2000s, he was on the team that helped write the Army and Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual that outlines US counterinsurgency strategy. Knife Fights, Dr. Nagl's recently released memoir, details his experiences in the modern American military.
Views: 45199 UC Berkeley Events
The Heat: The situation in Afghanistan Pt 3
 
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Nearly one month after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, U.S. troops entered Afghanistan and toppled the Taliban regime. But after two U.S. administrations and different strategies, the country is still divided into many factions. And the Taliban is back, regaining more and more control of Afghanistan. To discuss what’s next for Afghanistan: Omar Samad, a senior advisor to Afghanistan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah. Haroon Siddiqui, Editorial Page Editor Emeritus of the Toronto Star. Luke Coffey, director of the Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies at The Heritage Foundation. He Wenping, professor of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.
Views: 124 CGTN America
Obama calls for new strategies in Pakistan, Afghanistan
 
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In Tuesdays address to Congress, President Obama announced that the U.S. will forge a new strategy in Afghanistan and Pakistan. This declaration comes shortly after the deployment of 17,000 more U.S. troops to Afghanistan and a U.S. Government Accountability Office report (PDF) stating that the 12.3 billion dollars poured into Pakistan has not worked to boost security. Senior Pakistani and Afghan military and diplomatic officials are in Washington for talks. Worldfocus talks with The Atlantic Councils Shuja Nawaz to discuss why his organization recommends more investment in Pakistan and likely developments in Afghanistan and on its borders. Worldfocus video podcast: feed://feeds2.feedburner.com/worldfocus http://worldfocus.org/
Views: 280 worldfocusonline
Impact of Trump's Afghan Strategy on Pakistan
 
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Description: What is US President Donald Trump's new Afghan strategy? What are its key elements? More troops? No deadlines? Partnership with India? More pressure on Pakistan? Is it really "new" or just a rehash of earlier Bush and Obama era strategies? How will Pakistan respond to pressure? Has similar or greater pressure worked in the past? Is it likely to work this time? Does Trump administration have more or less leverage with Pakistan than Bush and Obama administrations? What are Pakistan's legitimate security interests in Afghanistan? Why does Pakistan believe India is using the Afghan soil to launch attacks in Pakistan? What is the way forward in Afghanistan? Can the US military defeat the Afghan Taliban? What about the emergence of ISIS in Afghanistan? Do Iran and Russia need to be involved in addition to India and Pakistan to stabilize Afghanistan? What will a regional solution look like? Viewpoint From Overseas host Misbah Azam discusses these questions with special guest United We Reach Chairperson Sabahat Rafiq and regular panelist Riaz Haq (www.riazhaq.com)
An End to the “Endless War?” Prospects for Stability and Reconciliation in Afghanistan
 
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The Brookings Doha Center (BDC) hosted a panel discussion on May 1, 2019 on the prospects for stability, peace, and reconciliation in Afghanistan. https://www.brookings.edu/events/an-end-to-the-endless-war-prospects-for-stability-and-reconciliation-in-afghanistan/ Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=BrookingsInstitution Follow Brookings on social media! Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/Brookings Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BrookingsInst Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/brookingsinst LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/com/company/the-brookings-institution
US Names 18th Afghan War Commander -- Are We Turning The Corner Yet?
 
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After 17 years of war, innumerable new "strategies," and trillions of dollars spent, the US war in Afghanistan is no closer to being "won" than ever. Will naming yet another war commander do the trick? Don't hold your breath!
Views: 7451 RonPaulLibertyReport
U.S. Policy in Iraq & Afghanistan: Linda Robinson
 
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ASP hosted a lively discussion on the lessons and legacies of U.S. policy in Afghanistan and Iraq - based on issues contained in a recently published book. Moderators: Seyom Brown and Robert H. Scales Co-Editors of the eponymous book Panel Participants & Chapter Authors: Stephen Biddle is senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. A member of the Defense Policy Board, he has served on strategic and military assessment teams for the U.S. Commands in Iraq and Afghanistan. His book Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle has won several major prizes. Seyom Brown, currently on research leave, is the Tower Chair in International Politics & National Security at Southern Methodist University, and senior advisor to the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Brown has held senior research and analysis positions at several policy think tanks. The most recent of his twelve books are Higher Realism: A New Foreign Policy for the United States and The Illusion of Control: Force and Foreign Policy in the 21st Century. Dan Caldwell is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He has served on the faculties of the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterrey, Brown, UCLA and Harvard. He is the author and editor of numerous books, including Vortex of Conflict: U.S Policy Toward Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq. Vanda Felbab-Brown is Fellow in Foreign Policy and the 21st Century Defense Initiative at the Brookings Institution. Her research focuses on the interactions among illicit economies, criminal organizations, and armed conflict. She is the author of Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs and numerous policy monographs. John Nagl, former president of the Center for a New American Security, is a research fellow at the U.S. Naval Academy. A veteran of both Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom, Nagl, along with Gen. David Petraeus and others, was a principal on the writing team for the 2006 U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Field Manual. Michael O'Hanlon is director of research and senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution. A frequent media and op-ed commentator on national security issues, he is the author of Defense Strategy for the Post-Saddam Era and The Wounded Giant. Linda Robinson is a scholarly journalist and consultant on political conflict, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and has reported extensively from the field in Iraq and Afghanistan. An adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, she is author of Tell Me How This Ends: General Petraeus and the Search for a Way out of Iraq. She is writing a book on Afghanistan that will be published in 2013. MG Robert H. Scales (ret), is President of Colgen, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in military affairs & strategy. Scales is a former Commandant for the U.S. Army War College and held command & staff positions inn the U.S., Germany, Korea and VietNam. He is the author of numerous books on contemporary and future warfare, including Yellow Smoke: The Future of Land Warfare for America's Military. Marvin Weinbaum is a scholar in residence at the Middle East Institute. An expert on Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt, and Turkey, he was an analyst in the U.S. Dept of State's Bureau of Intelligence & Research.
Counter-insurgency in Afghanistan
 
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The US administration has recently deployed additional 17,000 troops in southern Afghanistan. The US budget for Afghanistan as roughly tripled since 2001 but there is a realization among the Afghan experts in Washington that the military strategy can only be effective if its made part of a political strategy. Afghan experts at a discussion in United States Institute of Peace, however, said that so far a political strategy is missing from the US policy in Afghanistan. Nadeem Yaqub Urdu VOA News Washington.
Views: 348 VOA Urdu
Can The U.S. Win A Counterinsurgency War?
 
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Developed by the 173rd Airborne Brigade in 2010, the “soft approach” in Afghanistan’s Lowgar and Wardak Provinces was one of America’s most effective counterinsurgency efforts in the War on Terror. The program used local governments to rebuild trust between the people and the government of Afghanistan —a fundamental element of modern counterinsurgency policy. In his latest book, Why Counterinsurgency Fails: The U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan, Dr. de Tray highlights how this 2010 program affirmed that Afghanistan’s district sub-governors have both the will and capacity to serve their people. He suggests that perhaps the poor outcomes in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Vietnam before them are the result of a poor implementation of the U.S.’s counterinsurgency strategy. Dr. de Tray holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago and is a former World Bank Country Director for Indonesia and the five Central Asian Republics (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan). He has contributed to the work of several think tanks including the Center for Global Development, Results for Development Institute, and is currently a non-resident senior associate at CSIS. Erol Yayboke, deputy director and senior fellow of the Project on Prosperity Development who himself served in Iraq and Afghanistan, will moderate the discussion. A free PDF or e-book version of Why Counterinsurgency Fails: The U.S. in Iraq and Afghanistan will be made available to event attendees. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to our channel: http://cs.is/2dCfTve CSIS is the world's #1 defense and national security think tank. Visit http://www.csis.org to find more of our work as we bring bipartisan solutions to the world's greatest challenges. Check out the rest of our videos here: http://cs.is/2dolqpj Follow CSIS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/csis On Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CSIS.org And on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/csis/
Invading Iraq - Part One: How Britain And America Got It Wrong (Modern Military Documentary)
 
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Broadcast in 2003. Invading Iraq is a special two-hour documentary investigation recounting the key strategies, battles and turning points of the war from both sides of the battlefield - ending with the story of Saddam's capture. The documentary takes viewers behind the scenes of the allied invasion and advance on Baghdad. Through first-hand accounts from key commanders, frontline soldiers and civilians on both sides of the conflict, the film offers a rare battlefield perspective of the war as seen through the eyes of those who lived it. It also shows how the false assessment of Saddam Hussein's alleged weapons of mass destruction was just the first in a series of major intelligence failures that shaped the course of the war and led to the unstable occupation America and Britain are now mired in. Want to watch more full-length Documentaries? Click here: http://bit.ly/1GOzpIu Follow us on Twitter for more - https://twitter.com/realstoriesdocs Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/RealStoriesChannel Instagram - @realstoriesdocs Content licensed from Digital Rights Group (DRG). Any queries, please contact us at: [email protected] Produced by MENTORN FILMS LTD
Views: 1132289 Real Stories
The Future of Afghanistan and the Region in the New U.S. Administration
 
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Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. has engaged in and with Afghanistan in pursuit of common strategic interests. The U.S. cooperation with Afghanistan remains a key front in a generational conflict against violent extremists across the greater Middle East. In order to succeed, the U.S. needs, above all, allies in the region with whom it can partner militarily and politically, and the strategies and policies going forward need to include ensuring the success of this American-Afghan partnership. Afghanistan despite enormous achievements is also facing huge challenges on daily basis such as security, economy, domestic politics, and regional rivalries. As the new U.S. administration prepares to take office in few weeks’ time, it is important to discuss what Afghanistan and the South-Central Asia region mean for a Trump administration. The panelists will analyze what major developments have informed U.S. strategy since the National Unity Government took power in Afghanistan more than two years ago. The speakers will also discuss what a realistic vision is for the country’s future and how U.S. diplomatic, security, and aid policies could support that vision. Furthermore, how might or would the new administration modify its approach to Afghanistan and neighboring countries to encourage greater economic integration and prosperity in the region? Panelists: •Ambassador Earl Anthony Wayne: Former Assistant Secretary of State for Economic and Business Affairs, and former U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, Argentina, and Afghanistan •Ambassador James B. Cunningham: Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, Israel, and the United Nations, and Consul General for Hong Kong and Macau •Mr. Scott Worden: Director of Afghanistan and Center Asia at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP), and former Director of the Lessons Learned Program at the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) Moderated by Professor Kent Calder, Director of the Reischauer Center and Director of Asia Programs at Johns Hopkins SAIS, with panelists introductions by Mr. Rohullah Osmani, Visiting Scholar at the Reischauer Center and former Director General of the Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission in Afghanistan.
Views: 661 SAIS events
White House: No Change in Afghan Strategy
 
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The White House says the U.S. will not change its strategy or objectives in Afghanistan following the shooting of 16 Afghan civilians, allegedly by a U.S. soldier. (March 12) Subscribe to the Associated Press: http://bit.ly/APYouTube Download AP Mobile: http://www.ap.org/mobile/ Associated Press on Facebook: http://apne.ws/c7lQTV Associated Press on Twitter: http://apne.ws/bTquhb Associated Press on Google+: http://bit.ly/zuTKBL
Views: 596 Associated Press
Obama's New Afghan War Strategy
 
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Chairman of the Senate Armed Services committee Carl Levin and CBS News National Security Correspondent David Martin spoke to Bob Schieffer on President Obama's decision to fire General Stanley McChrystal over his comments made in a "Rolling Stones" article and whether his policy and strategy in Afghanistan will be successful.
Views: 158 CBS News
CrossTalk: Doomed in Afghanistan
 
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With the war in Afghanistan lost, how do the Western powers get out? Peter Lavelle asks his guests whether any exit strategies are available.
Views: 2168 RT
Why Blackwater cannot be the future of U.S. warfare | Sean McFate
 
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Can 6,500 mercenaries "fix" Afghanistan? The U.S. is resurrecting privatized warfare. - The West has stopped winning wars because it still operates on WWII strategies, says Sean McFate. Poor strategy results in so-called 'forever wars'. - To end the nearly 20-year-long war in Afghanistan, the U.S. is considering replacing all U.S. troops with Blackwater mercenaries. - Why is that so dangerous? Because this is what the future looks like when you resurrect privatized warfare. Dr. Sean McFate is an adviser to Oxford University's Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, as well as a professor of strategy at the National Defense University and Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Washington, DC. He is the author of several books, including Shadow War, The Modern Mercenary, and most recently The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder (https://amzn.to/2OIlwbp) Read more at BigThink.com: https://bigthink.com/videos/why-blackwater-cannot-be-the-future-of-u-s-warfare Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink
Views: 14239 Big Think
Improving Aid to Stabilize Conflicts: The Afghan Case
 
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In the past decade, the United States and its allies have invested billions of dollars on assistance in Afghanistan, Iraq and other conflict zones. In Afghanistan, the U.S. Agency for International Development has implemented projects to help stabilize the country as part of a counterinsurgency strategy. Making sure that such efforts are effective is vital to national security and efficient spending. To evaluate such stabilization-related assistance, USAID commissioned a study by the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project at Princeton University. Join USIP on June 21 for a first look at the results, which can inform more effective stabilization work in future conflicts. For more information about this event, visit: https://www.usip.org/events/improving-aid-stabilize-conflicts-afghan-case Connect with us! Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=usinstituteofpeace Twitter: https://twitter.com/USIP Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/usinstituteofpeace/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/usipeace/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/united-states-institute-of-peace Newsletters: http://www.usip.org/sign-usip-updates The United States Institute of Peace works to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflict around the world. USIP does this by engaging directly in conflict zones and by providing analysis, education, and resources to those working for peace. Created by Congress in 1984 as an independent, nonpartisan, federally funded organization, USIP’s more than 300 staff work at the Institute’s D.C. headquarters, and on the ground in the world’s most dangerous regions.
Is Indo-Afghan strategic treaty a scripted endgame in Afghanistan? (Sochta Pakistan, 7 Oct 2011)
 
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Dr Moeed Pirzada discusses with Rustam Shah Mehmond, Muhammad Malick, Simbal Khan and Dr. Riffat Hussain that Karzai's recent visit to India and singing of strategic treaty in the backdrop of Mullen's allegation on Pakistan is a major development. Is this development pointing towards the reality of prevalent predictions of scripted end game in Afghanistan? Is this development intended to give a role to India in Afghanistan as US withdraws?
Views: 40294 SuperAbdullah2009
President Bush comments on Iraq, Afghanistan
 
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1. SOUNDBITE: (English) George W. Bush, US President "I'm not suggesting that we shouldn't as a government continue to press them. What I am suggesting though, there is a functioning government. Your statement was, security didn't, you know, provide room for a government to stand up and function. Well, it's happening. And therefore we will continue to press them on de-Baath law, provincial election laws, power-sharing with the central government in the provinces, an oil law. But as I've reminded you from this podium, they are distributing oil-revenues to the provinces. There is revenue sharing. And there is local reconciliation taking place. And a lot of the time its local politics will drive national politics. Are we satisfied with the progress in Baghdad? No. But to say nothing's happening is simply not the case." 2. SOUNDBITE: (English) George W. Bush, US President "You know, part of the review is to assess how best to make sure our coalition partners realise there is a coherent strategy of which they area an integral part, all aiming to make sure that there is a presence that will assure the Afghan government and the Afghan people that people will be trying to help them with their security. You know, it makes sense for us to constantly review our strategies in a variety of theatres. That's what good governance is, you analyse the situation a year after a previous strategy, determine what did work and what didn't work. What did work was, you might remember, last year I guess there was a lot of talk about the 'Taliban surge' or the 'Taliban offensive'. And General McNeil informed us that the only team that's going to be on the offence is America and NATO allies and other allies. And we were on the offence, and Taliban got hit hard last year. The question of course is, just like in Iraq, is there a follow-up to the security gates. You know, is life changing better for the average citizen? That's the question that we've all got to be looking at. Unity governments are important, but does the average citizen realise that a free society is in his or her interest?" STORYLINE: President George W. Bush says he's not satisfied with current progress in Iraq, but denied that security issues were preventing the Iraqi government from functioning. Bush was briefing journalists at the White House in Washington DC. He also pointed to progress on the sharing of oil revenues and local reconciliation as evidence that things were moving in the right direction. "There is revenue sharing. And there is local reconciliation taking place" he said. "And a lot of the time its local politics will drive national politics. Are we satisfied with the progress in Baghdad? No. But to say nothing's happening is simply not the case." In response to a question about a recently-announced review of the situation in Afghanistan, and how it might relate to NATO allies of the US, Bush said the aim was: "to make sure our coalition partners realise there is a coherent strategy of which they area an integral part, all aiming to make sure that there is a presence that will assure the Afghan government and the Afghan people that people will be trying to help them with their security." He pointed out that despite talk last year about a Taliban offensive, the main offensive had come from allied forces. Bush suggested it was now time to look at what comes after that offensive. "The question of course is, just like in Iraq, is there a follow-up to the security gates," he said. "You know, is life changing better for the average citizen?That's the question that we've all got to be looking at. Unity governments are important, but does the average citizen realise that a free society is in his or her interest?" You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/8d8514e5ca68fa99ee335e5294f3e745 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 104 AP Archive
Can the humanitarian mission and the military mission in Afghanistan overlap?
 
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President Obama has spent a lot of time and energy trying to distance himself from former president Bush's strategies on a lot of things, especially the war in Afghanistan which right now has one of the lowest approval ratings of all time. But has the United States' actions in Afghanistan actually reflected Obama's new and improved words?
Views: 1452 RT
Marine Corps Combat Gear...Vietnam to Afghanistan
 
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Marine gear - Past and Present. This video is from the Department of Defense and as such is in the public domain. Any copying, editing or reproduction is authorized and encouraged.
Views: 34267 DevilDog
Third presidential debate (Part 6): Afghanistan
 
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The candidates address the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan and the country's relationship with Pakistan. Watch all of the debates LIVE at http://www.cnn.com/debates/ For more CNN videos, check out our YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/cnn Or visit our site at http://www.cnn.com/video/
Views: 5057 CNN
Exit Strategies and Lessons Learned: from the Balkans to Afghanistan
 
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Speaker(s): Professor Richard Caplan Chair: Dr Denisa Kostovicova Recorded on 4 October 2011 in New Theatre, East Building. Currently leading a research project on 'Exit Strategies and Peacen Consolidation', Richard Caplan will analyse the lessons of the past for an exit strategy in Afghanistan. Richard Caplan is professor of international relations and official fellow of Linacre College. He is also director of the Centre for International Studies. An mp3 audio podcast is available here - http://www2.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=1160
@ Brookings Podcast: Counterinsurgency and State-Building in Afghanistan after 2014
 
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Part 1 of 4 Following U.S. troop withdrawal in 2014, Afghanistan faces an uncertain future. Its fate could be compromised or even commanded by war lords, terrorists or corrupt government officials. Fellow Vanda Felbab-Brown spent time on the ground observing events and talking to a mix of Afghans from high ranking officials to village elders, to merchants to the person on the street. In this four-part video series based on her book, "Aspiration and Ambivalence: Strategies and Realities of Counterinsurgency and State-Building in Afghanistan," Felbab-Brown offers analysis on an Afghanistan in flux. More at Brookings.edu: http://goo.gl/8MVDS
President Obama on the Way Forward in Afghanistan and Pakistan
 
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President Obama outlines his strategy on Afghanistan and Pakistan from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. December 1, 2009 (Public Domain).
Views: 54325 The Obama White House
Senate's "Nuclear Option," 10-yr U.S.-Afghan Plan, Military Sexual Assaults & Remembering JFK
 
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Why Democrats decided to exercise the "nuclear option"; a tentative deal with the Afghan government over U.S. troops in Afghanistan through 2024; the Senate debate over military sexual assaults; and JFK's accomplishments and legacy. Joining Gwen: Martha Raddatz, ABC News; James Kitfield, National Journal; Susan Davis, USA Today, and Michael Duffy, Time Magazine.
Views: 3282 Washington Week
Transition and Reconstruction: Evolving US-Afghan Partnerships
 
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Mohammad Iqbal Azizi Afghan Governor, Laghman Province Mr. Miguel Sapp (S.U. College of Law '88; MPA '89) Director, Laghman Provincial Reconstruction Team, U.S. Department of State We welcome Afghan Governor Iqbal Azizi of Laghman Province and Mr. Miguel Sapp, Director of the Laghman Provincial Reconstruction Team for a discussion on the evolving nature of U.S and Afghan partnerships. This event is just one part of a two-week program supported and tailored by the U.S. Embassy in Kabul and INSCT to expose Governor Azizi to the U.S. and to provide him with tangible examples of how democratic governance operates in the U.S. on federal, state and local levels. In addition to this event, Governor Azizi will participate in a number of speaking engagements and informative discussions with elected officials in Washington, D.C. and at their district offices in Syracuse, NY in order to discuss the responsibilities of state and local governments in administering public services, the different roles of federal and state governments, cooperation between public and private sectors, public decision-making processes, budgeting processes, and emergency response strategies and procedures.
NATO Secretary General - Strategy and timeline in Afghanistan unchanged, part 1/2
 
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Joint press conference by NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen and the President of Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai - Opening remarks More info: http://goo.gl/8LCEe NATO Homepage: http://www.nato.int
Views: 568 NATO
BREAKING: TALIBAN SHOOTS 45 ROCKETS AT MAD DOG MATTIS’ PLANE IN AFGHANISTAN – HERE’S WHAT WE KNOW
 
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Earlier today, Mad Dog Mattis arrived in war-torn Afghanistan to discuss defense strategies with the local resistance—in response, he was met with fire and fury as dozens of rockets and rocket propelled grenades rained down on his plane. The airport which was targeted is located in Kabul, the capital of Afghanistan—and while reports differ on how many rockets were shot at the airport which Mad Dog Mattis arrived at, the highest count comes in at a whopping 45 rockets and rocket propelled grenades. Thankfully, the Secretary of Defense had already left the airport by the time that the attack was launched. The rockets appeared to be aimed at Mattis’ plane, however, hoping he was still aboard. There was one unconfirmed report of an injury associated with the rocket attack, but according to officials it was not a direct hit and will likely not be a casualty. Fox News reports: Forty to 45 rockets and rocket-propelled grenades landed near a passenger terminal at Kabul’s international airport Wednesday less than two hours after U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis arrived there. Mattis arrived in Kabul just after 11 p.m. ET — 7:30 a.m. in Kabul –after spending Tuesday in India. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg was also on the flight. Mattis spoke about the attack at a news conference in Kabul, alongside Afghanistan’s president. While the Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, Mattis doubled down on his plan to completely eradicate the rogue terrorist cell. “We will suffocate any hope that Al Qaeda or ISIS or the Taliban have of winning by killing. I want to reinforce to the Taliban that the only path to peace and political legitimacy to them is through a negotiated settlement,” he said. This marks the Secretary of Defense’s first trip to Afghanistan since President Trump announced his new strategy for the war torn country, recommitting to restoring peace and democracy in the unstable region. This new strategy for the 16-year-old war would include sending thousands more US troops back into Afghanistan. Sixteen years after the 9/11 attacks, Kabul is still being attacked by the Taliban. On Tuesday in Washington, Gen. Joe Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said it’s time to demand that Pakistan stop giving sanctuary to the Taliban. Already the U.S. military is stepping up its air strikes in Afghanistan. In August, more bombs were dropped on the Taliban and an ISIS-affiliated group than any month since 2012. The director of the Kabul airport said all flights have been halted as result of the mortar attack at the airport. CNN adds that the Afghan police have been put on high alert and are currently searching nearby houses where they believe the rockets were shot from. While no suspects have been apprehended yet, Taliban spokesperson Zabiullah Mujahid tweeted out that the attack was their doing. As US officials scramble to keep Mad Dog Mattis safe in one of the most war torn countries on the planet, many are left asking why we’re devoting so much energy towards restoring a terrorist infested nation. While some have argued that peace in the middle east is of the utmost importance, many believe that it isn’t worth the cost in American lives. source: https://goo.gl/Zq4mQM
Views: 42 KHKT News Today